Stress Management for Life A Research Based Experiential Approach 4th Edition By Olpin – test Bank

$20.00

Pay And Download

 

Complete Test Bank With Answers

 

 

 

Sample Questions Posted Below

 

 

 

 

 

True / False

 

1. ​It is the interpretation of an event that initiates the fight-or-flight response, not the event itself.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   True
REFERENCES:   Perception
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

2. ​The key message of the POPP formula for stress prevention is that there is an actual point in time where a positive interpretation of a potential stressor can prevent the stress response from initiating.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   True
REFERENCES:   Cognitive Restructuring
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

3. ​When we sense any kind of danger, our body’s natural way to survive it is the fight-or-flight response.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   True
REFERENCES:   Perception
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

4. ​One can only inherit the characteristics of hardiness. They are genetically passed through the parents’ DNA to their children.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   False
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

5. ​The Chinese word for ‘crisis’ consists of two characters—danger and chance.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   False
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

6. ​Cognitive restructuring substitutes our perceptions of stressors from thoughts that are non-threatening to thoughts that are threatening.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   False
REFERENCES:   Cognitive Restructuring
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

7. ​An inverse relationship exists between the amount of control we feel and the corresponding amount of stress we feel.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   True
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

8. ​Individuals with a tendency to think from the perspective of an external locus of control are more likely to take responsibility for the fact that they influence what happens in their life.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   False
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

9. ​Ultimately, we do not have the power to control anyone else.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   True
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

10. ​The essential concept in preventing stress is that only a modest number of events in life are inherently stressful.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   False
REFERENCES:   The World is NOT a Stressful Place
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

Multiple Choice

 

11. ​Which dimension of health is the focus of this chapter?

  a. ​physical
  b. ​spiritual
  c. ​emotional
  d. ​social
  e. ​intellectual

 

ANSWER:   e
REFERENCES:   The Power of Perception
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

12. ​The most critical aspect in preventing unnecessary and unhealthy stress is _____.

  a. social training​
  b. ​genetic makeup
  c. ​perception
  d. ​one’s environment
  e. ​physical exercise

 

ANSWER:   c
REFERENCES:   Perception
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

13. ​The author estimates that in reality most Americans are in actual danger _____ percent of the time.

  a. ​less than 1
  b. ​5-10
  c. ​about 25
  d. ​about 40
  e. ​over 50

 

ANSWER:   a
REFERENCES:   Perception
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

14. ​Cognitive restructuring is sometimes referred to as _____.

  a. ​self-limiting beliefs
  b. ​cognitive distortion
  c. ​locus of control
  d. ​reframing
  e. ​self-efficacy

 

ANSWER:   d
REFERENCES:   Cognitive Restructuring
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

15. ​Stress is a coupled action of the body and mind, involving appraisal of a _____.

  a. ​problem
  b. ​threat
  c. ​terror
  d. ​pain
  e. ​new situation

 

ANSWER:   b
REFERENCES:   Perception
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

16. ​Whenever we sense a potential for pain or danger of any kind—emotional, social, spiritual, or physical—our body reacts in its perfect way to help us _____.

  a. ​fix the problem
  b. ​anticipate a future threat
  c. ​change how we think
  d. ​survive the threat
  e. ​remain calm

 

ANSWER:   d
REFERENCES:   Perception
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

17. ​The POPP formula for prevention of stress stands for _____.

  a. ​periods of perceptive positioning
  b. ​practice of prevention pointers
  c. ​point of positive perception
  d. ​putting out paranoid perceptions
  e. ​period of preventive perception

 

ANSWER:   c
REFERENCES:   Cognitive Restructuring
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

18. ​The characteristics of a hardy individual are _____.

  a. ​commitment, challenge, and control
  b. ​creativity, courage, and compassion
  c. ​candor, courage, and control
  d. ​confidence, commitment, and collaboration
  e. ​compassion, commitment, and control

 

ANSWER:   a
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

19. ​Which statement best demonstrates internal locus of control thinking?

  a. ​“I am stressed because my boyfriend never asks my opinion about what we should do on a date.”
  b. ​“I wouldn’t be so stressed if my teachers didn’t give us so much homework.”
  c. ​“How can I not be stressed when my parents don’t give me any money for car payments?”
  d. ​“I would get to class on time if this school provided more parking for students.”
  e. ​“Making a schedule and planning my time will help me reduce my stress levels.”

 

ANSWER:   e
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Apply

 

20. ​Benedict, a sophomore, pre-med major, finds himself thinking “I will never do well enough in these required courses to get into med school.” He is engaging in _____.

  a. ​positive perceptions
  b. ​self-limiting beliefs
  c. ​questioning reality
  d. ​phased-out thinking
  e. ​cognitive restructuring

 

ANSWER:   b
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Apply

 

Matching

 

Match the correct answer with the appropriate term.​

a. ​The mental act of changing the meaning or interpretation of an environmental stressor
b. ​When perceptions become distorted or magnified out of proportion to their seriousness
c. ​A mental process that consists of thinking and reasoning skills
d. ​Commitment to inaccurate beliefs about ourselves
e. ​Interpretation of a stressor
f. ​The belief in one’s ability to accomplish a goal or change a behavior
g. ​Faulty beliefs that a person does not have the ability to carry out a specific task

 

REFERENCES:   Cognitive Restructuring
Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

21. ​cognition

ANSWER:   c

 

22. ​cognitive appraisal

ANSWER:   e

 

23. ​cognitive restructuring

ANSWER:   a

 

24. ​cognitive distortion

ANSWER:   b

 

25. ​premature cognitive commitment

ANSWER:   d

 

26. ​self-efficacy

ANSWER:   f

 

27. ​self-limiting beliefs

ANSWER:   g

 

Completion

 

28. ​To address the question “Can I handle this situation?” in order to help diffuse the stress response, we look to ____________________.

ANSWER:   our past experience
REFERENCES:   Putting It All Together
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

29. ​According to Dr. Daniel Freedman, an individual’s perception of threat is modified by the person’s ____________________ and experience.

ANSWER:   ​temperament
REFERENCES:   Perception
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

30. ​The purpose of the POPP formula is ____________________.

ANSWER:   prevention​
REFERENCES:   Cognitive Restructuring
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

Subjective Short Answer

 

31. ​According to the culture connection in Chapter 5, Fear of Failure, the Chinese word for ‘crisis’ consists of two characters: danger and opportunity. Explain how this understanding of the term ‘crisis’ relates to personal experience with stress.

ANSWER:   The text quotes Paul J. Rosch, M.D., president of the American Institute of Stress, who says that most anxiety is based on personal perception. “The Chinese word for ‘crisis’ consists of two characters — danger and opportunity. If you fear failure, you are under the kind of constant, slow-burning stress that can deplete your energy and corrode your health. If you can learn to see your failures as opportunities to learn and grow, the danger is gone and stress evaporates.”​
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

32. ​Give a specific example that shows how locus of control impacts an individual’s experience with stress.

ANSWER:   ​Student examples will vary. Locus of control (LOC) refers to the extent to which we believe that we control events that affect us. People with an internal locus of control see themselves as responsible for the outcomes of their own actions. People with an external locus of control believe that whatever happens to them is unrelated to their own behavior—making it beyond their control. People with a tendency to think from an internal LOC perspective are more likely to take responsibility and believe they can influence what happens to them. Moving toward this style of thinking positively affects one’s ability to reduce the stress in one’s life.
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

33. ​Briefly describe the three personality traits of hardy people.

ANSWER:   The three personality traits are commitment, challenge, and control. A hardy individual is someone who:

1. Views potentially stressful events as interesting and meaningful (commitment)

2. Sees change as normal and as an opportunity for growth (challenge)

3. Sees oneself as capable of having an influence on events (control)

REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

34. ​Discuss why the personality traits associated with hardiness can help buffer stress.

ANSWER:   ​Individuals strong in commitment believe in the truth and value of who they are and what they are doing. They have a sense of meaning and purpose in work and relationships. Therefore they remain committed and deeply involved rather than allowing themselves to become alienated by fear, uncertainty, or boredom. The term challenge reflects an outlook on life that enables an individual to perceive change as an opportunity for growth rather than a threat to one’s sense of security or survival. Change, rather than stability, is seen as the common mode of life. The term control reflects a belief that one can influence the course of life events within reasonable limits. Hardy individuals have an internal sense of personal mastery, confronting problems with confidence in their ability to implement effective solutions.
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

35. ​Describe the three questions we can ask ourselves when we find ourselves becoming tense, in order to diffuse the need to turn on the stress response.

ANSWER:   1. Is this stressor real? Am I really in danger, or am I just imagining or creating the danger or pain? If we look at the situation with a rational eye, we find that rarely is the danger or pain real.

2. Can I handle this situation? One sure source to determine if we can handle something, and therefore diffuse the need to turn on the stress response, is our past experience.

3. Can I think about this differently? As events happen, we have a choice about how we view them or what they mean to us. Depending on how we interpret the situations will lead to feelings of calmness or stress.​

REFERENCES:   Putting It All Together
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

36. ​Explain what is meant by the statement, “It is the perception or interpretation of an event that sparks the fight-or-flight response, rather than the event itself.”

ANSWER:   The chronic stress that we feel is rarely, if ever, the result of a truly threatening situation. Our stress almost always stems from situations that are not, by their nature, sufficient to put us in real danger. The outcome that we think is going to do us harm usually doesn’t. As a result, we create in our bodies a false sense of emergency. This leads to an important conclusion about the stress we feel: The perception or the interpretation of an event is what initiates the fight-or-flight response. The event itself is not what causes us to experience stress. As stress theory has evolved, the notion that human stress is a direct response to external stimulus is no longer credible. Whether we feel stressed seems to depend on how we view what is happening. Interpretation of stressors, not the stressors themselves, causes distress.​
REFERENCES:   Perception
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

37. ​Explain the statement, “The world is not a stressful place.”

ANSWER:   The essential concept in preventing stress is that no event in life is inherently stressful. Rather, we make stressful interpretations of the events of our days. No event in life causes stress universally for everyone. We have decided that some facet of the situation will inflict pain or discomfort, which may be physical, emotional, or spiritual. The situation also may be seen as a threat to our sense of well-being and comfort. This understanding shifts the influence of what causes stress from external factors to internal control. Although some situations, such as a tsunami, a hurricane, an incurable illness, or being attacked, will be interpreted as stressful almost universally, we usually have the power to take control of how we interpret any event in life.​
REFERENCES:   The World is NOT a Stressful Place
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

38. ​Briefly describe the research study highlighted in the text related to job stress and health problems.

ANSWER:   ​Job stress can raise blood pressure over the long term, according to a study in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Men working 25 or more years in a demanding job where they felt they had little control had higher blood pressure at work and home than those who felt they had more control. The deterioration of health was not a result of the job itself but, rather, to the lack of control the worker felt. Feeling in control of our life reduces the unhealthy physiological changes induced by the stress response.
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

39. ​Explain cognitive restructuring.

ANSWER:   ​Cognitive restructuring refers to the mental act of changing the meaning or our interpretation of the environmental stressors in life. This is sometimes called reframing. This approach substitutes our perceptions of stressors from thoughts that are threatening to thoughts that are non-threatening. The source of excess stress is cognitive distortion, in which perceptions become distorted and magnified out of proportion to their seriousness. Cognitive restructuring entails first awareness, and then correction, of these stressful, erroneous thoughts.
REFERENCES:   Cognitive Restructuring
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

40. ​The authors pose the question, “If someone were to give you a thousand dollars to sit next to a crying baby during a 2-hour airplane flight, . . . could you do it?” What is the point that they are making?

ANSWER:   The authors are providing a contrast to self-limiting beliefs. If the need or desire is great enough, we can control a lot more than we think. In answer to question posed, they respond, “Of course you could. Could you do it without feeling stressed? Suddenly it is not so awful, is it? Events that seem irritating and stress-producing take on new meaning. When we are highly motivated, we can take control and prevent the event from initiating the stress response. If you could control your stress response for a thousand dollars, would you do it for a lifetime of less stress and better health? Again, we see the principle of perception and interpretation at play in virtually all events.”​
REFERENCES:   Hardiness
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

 

 

 

 

True / False

 

1. Breathing links mind and body through the interaction of the voluntary and involuntary nervous systems.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   True
REFERENCES:   Take a Breath
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

2. Contraction of the diaphragm during the breathing process produces a decrease in the volume of the chest cavity.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   False
REFERENCES:   How Breathing Works
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

3. Deep abdominal breathing is frequently a signal that the fight-or-flight response is activated.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   False
REFERENCES:   How Breathing Works
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

4. Our natural way of breathing is abdominally.​

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   True
REFERENCES:   How Breathing Works
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

5. Nearly every stress management technique that is devised specifically to reduce sympathetic nervous activity includes a breathing component.​

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   True
REFERENCES:   Breathing and Relaxation
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

6. Abdominal breathing has been shown to have no effect on test anxiety or academic achievement.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   False
REFERENCES:   Benefits of Relaxation Breathing
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

7. Yoga teaches that interruption of the flow of prana can have a harmful effect on physical, mental, and spiritual health.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   True
REFERENCES:   Culture Connection: Breath of Life
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

8. The term “breathwork” applies exclusively “stand-alone” breathing techniques.​

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   False
REFERENCES:   Background
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

9. When breathing is restricted, cells throughout the body do not receive an adequate supply of oxygen.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   True
REFERENCES:   How Breathing Works
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

10. When a person turns on their computer, their breathing rate goes up by 30%.

  a. True
  b. False

 

ANSWER:   True
REFERENCES:   FYI Box: Breathing Break
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

Multiple Choice

 

11. ​Adults normally breathe at the rate of how many breaths per minute?

  a. ​6 to 10
  b. ​12 to 16
  c. ​18 to 20
  d. 22 to 26
  e. ​10 to 12

 

ANSWER:   b
REFERENCES:   Take a Breath
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

12. ​What large, umbrella-shaped sheet of muscle separates the contents of the chest from the contents of the abdomen and plays a key role in the process of breathing?

  a. ​epiglottis
  b. ​thoracic muscles
  c. ​diaphragm
  d. ​intercostals
  e. ​oblique abdominals

 

ANSWER:   c
REFERENCES:   How Breathing Works
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

13. ​____ refers to the control of breath, and is derived from the Sanskrit words for “life energy” and “control.”

  a. ​Pranayama
  b. ​Asana
  c. ​Sutras
  d. ​Kundalini
  e. ​Satya

 

ANSWER:   a
REFERENCES:   Culture Connection: Breath of Life
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

14. ​What occurs during the inbreath stage of breathing?

  a. ​The diaphragm contracts, resulting in an increase in the volume of the chest cavity and a decrease in the air pressure in the lungs.
  b. ​The diaphragm relaxes, resulting in an increase in the volume of the chest cavity and a decrease in the air pressure in the lungs.
  c. ​The diaphragm contracts, resulting in a decrease in the volume of the chest cavity and a decrease in the air pressure in the lungs.
  d. ​The diaphragm relaxes, resulting in a decrease in the volume of the chest cavity and an increase in the air pressure in the lungs.
  e. ​The diaphragm contracts, resulting in an increase in the volume of the chest cavity and an increase in the air pressure in the lungs.

 

ANSWER:   a
REFERENCES:   How Breathing Works
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

15. ​Inadequate oxygen due to poor breathing patterns is most likely to result in ____.

  a. ​drowsiness
  b. ​alertness
  c. ​relaxation
  d. ​decreased stress
  e. ​decrease in the fight-or-flight response

 

ANSWER:   a
REFERENCES:   Benefits of Relaxation Breathing
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

16. ​What type of breathing, also known as balanced breathing, makes the respiratory rhythm more regular, which in turn has a soothing effect on the entire nervous system?

  a. ​thoracic
  b. ​outbreath
  c. ​command
  d. ​alternating nostril
  e. ​single nostril

 

ANSWER:   d
REFERENCES:   Breathing Exercises
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

17. ​Breathing is controlled by the brain as part of which system?

  a. central nervous system​
  b. ​autonomic nervous system
  c. ​controlled nervous system
  d. ​limbic system
  e. ​breathing system

 

ANSWER:   b
REFERENCES:   How Breathing Works
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Remember

 

18. ​Gina is experiencing menopause with some typical negative symptoms. According to Robert Freedman, which of her symptoms could be reduced by slow, controlled breathing?

  a. ​hot flashes
  b. ​weight gain
  c. ​low blood pressure
  d. ​infrequent menstruation
  e. ​wrinkles

 

ANSWER:   a
REFERENCES:   Benefits of Relaxation Breathing
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

19. ​Tamzin suffers from test anxiety, and asks for your advice on how to cope. Which type of breathing would be best for her?

  a. ​natural, slow breathing
  b. ​shallow, rapid breathing
  c. ​chest breathing
  d. ​natural, rapid breathing
  e. ​shallow, slow breathing

 

ANSWER:   a
REFERENCES:   Research Highlight: Using Breathing Techniques to Ease Test Anxiety
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Apply

 

20. ​Mackie would like to practice the reduced respirations technique because it is known to reduce an individual’s breathing rate to as low as ____ breaths per minute.

  a. ​14 to 16
  b. ​10 to 12
  c. ​8 to 10
  d. ​4 to 5
  e. ​1 to 3

 

ANSWER:   d
REFERENCES:   How to Do Relaxation Breathing
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Apply

 

Matching

 

Match the correct answer with the appropriate term.​

a. ​diaphragmatic
b. ​thoracic
c. ​inbreath
d. ​outbreath

 

REFERENCES:   How Breathing Works
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

21. ​​starts with increased volume in chest and decreased air pressure in lungs

ANSWER:   c

 

22. ​also called chest breathing

ANSWER:   b

 

23. ​also called abdominal breathing

ANSWER:   a

 

24. ​starts with decreased volume in chest and increased air pressure in lungs

ANSWER:   d

 

​Match the best answer with the terms below.

a. ​reduced respirations technique
b. ​left-nostril breathing
c. ​balanced breathing
d. ​relaxation breathing
e. ​simple diaphragmatic breathing
f. ​right-nostril breathing

 

REFERENCES:   Breathing Exercises
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

25. ​involves making your stomach move while your chest remains still

ANSWER:   e

 

26. ​involves an inhale that should take about six seconds

ANSWER:   a

 

27. ​thought to increase energy

ANSWER:   f

 

28. ​ involves changing which part of your torso is doing the breathing work, the chest or abdominal area

ANSWER:   d

 

29. ​thought to increase calmness

ANSWER:   b

 

30. ​involves inhaling through one nostril and exhaling through the other

ANSWER:   c

 

Essay

 

31. Describe the benefits of breathing for relaxation.

ANSWER:   Breathing techniques allow the mind and body time to slow down, energize, and develop harmony and tranquility. Slow, rhythmic breathing can turn an anxious mental state into a state of relative tranquility and release the body from many other adverse effects of anxiety. Adjusting our breathing back to its natural way of deep and slow breathing sends an instant message to the autonomic nervous system that there is no threat and the body can return to homeostasis. Breathing techniques induce relaxation and activate the calming parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system.
REFERENCES:   Benefits of Relaxation Breathing
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

32. Explain the anatomy and physiology of breathing. Include an explanation of what happens during the inbreath and outbreath stages of breathing.​

ANSWER:   When the diaphragm contracts, it tightens and draws downward because it is anchored all along the rim of the rib cage. This downward movement increases the volume of the chest cavity, in which the lungs are located on either side of the heart. The increased volume in the chest produces a decrease in the air pressure in the lungs. Because of the decreased pressure inside the lungs, air from outside the body, which is at a higher pressure, flows into the lungs to equalize the pressure. This is the inbreath. After the diaphragm contracts, it goes through a relaxation. As the diaphragm muscle relaxes, it gets looser and returns to its original position higher up in the chest, thereby decreasing the volume of the chest cavity. This increases the pressure in the chest, which forces the air in the lungs out through the nose (and mouth if it is open). This is the outbreath. So in all breathing, the air is drawn into the lungs as the diaphragm contracts and lowers, and it is expelled as the diaphragm relaxes and comes back up.
REFERENCES:   How Breathing Works
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

33. This chapter describes many breathing techniques. What three different techniques do you think would be most effective for relaxation?​

ANSWER:   Any combination of three of the following:

  • Simple Diaphragmatic Breathing: make the stomach move out with the inhalation and in with the exhalation, while the chest remains still.
  • Restful Breathing: change your breathing pattern by allowing your breath to go down as deep as possible into the lowest parts of your lungs
  • Breath Counting: count each breath as it comes in and goes back out
  • Reduced Respirations Technique: reduce breathing rate to as low as 4 to 5 breaths per minute
  • Alternate Nostril Breathing (or Balanced Breathing): the thumb and forefinger are used to alternate pressing on either side of the nose, as you alternately exhale and inhale through one nostril, then exhale and inhale through the other nostril
  • Full Breathing: breathing in first to the abdomen, then slowly filling up the rest of the lungs as you inhale
  • Visualization Breathing: combines full breathing with visualization
  • Command Breathing: guide tells the meditator to take a deep breath, hold it for a few moments, then at the command of the guide, releasing it completely
  • Pelvic Tilt with Diaphragmatic Breathing: coordinate the gentle, rocking spinal movement and pelvic tilt with breathing
  • Breathing while Stretching: targets whole-body tension, diverting attention from anxiety-related physiological sensations toward feelings of relaxation and calmness through breathing
REFERENCES:   Breathing Exercises
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Evaluate

 

34. Consider the efficacy of breathing techniques on different ailments, and then make suggestions for breathing practices for one of the following people, including instructions for the breathing technique he or she should try:

a. Louise, who suffers from test anxiety

b. Jenna, who needs a boost in concentration and energy when studying

c. Hal, who has trouble sleeping

ANSWER:   a. Louise should try diaphragmatic breathing practices, such as simple diaphragmatic breathing, because it calms a person down and counteracts the fight or flight response. In addition, simple diaphragmatic breathing can be done anywhere, including in the middle of a test. For simple diaphragmatic breathing, she should pay attention to her breath. With one hand on her chest and one on her stomach, she should make sure that her stomach is moving and her chest is staying still with each breath.

b. Jenna should practice right-nostril breathing, since it boosts energy. She should close off her left nostril with her index finger and inhale slowly and deeply through her right nostril until she feels a sense of fullness in her lungs. She should hold the breath for a count of 3 seconds, and then exhale slowly and completely through the right nostril. This cycle of breathing should be done 7 to 10 times or until she obtains a sense of being energized.

c. Hal should try restful breathing, which is particularly effective in fighting insomnia. From a lying position, he should first simply pay attention to how he is breathing. After a few moments, he should deepen his breath so that it is filling the deepest part of his lungs. He can count backwards from twenty, saying one number on each inhale, and the word “relax” on each exhale.

REFERENCES:   Breathing Exercises
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Apply

 

35. Florence is walking home at night and hears a sound behind her. What is the likely effect on her breathing, and how should she breathe in order to reduce her anxiety?

ANSWER:   Because she is scared, Florence’s breath is likely to become shallow and rapid, since thoracic (or chest) breathing often happens during the fight or flight response. To calm herself down, Florence should focus making her breaths deep and slow, engaging in diaphragmatic (or abdominal) breathing.
REFERENCES:   How Breathing Works
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Apply

 

36. Describe some of the benefits of breathwork.

ANSWER:   Many breathwork techniques are particularly useful because you can do them anywhere and anytime. Focusing attention on the breath also serves the meditative function of allowing the mind to more easily release distressing thoughts and emotions. Finally, breathwork helps fight the physiological signs of stress, such as tension and shallow breathing.
REFERENCES:   Background
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

37. Discuss the connection between tightness in the abdomen and breathing. Provide a description of what should happen to your belly during ideal breathing, and why.​

ANSWER:   Suppose the muscles that form the wall of your belly (the abdomen) are tight rather than relaxed when the diaphragm is contracting. As the diaphragm pushes down on the stomach, the liver, and the other abdominal organs, it will meet resistance and will not be able to descend very far. Your breathing will tend to be shallow and rather high up in the chest. In abdominal or diaphragmatic breathing, the idea is to relax your belly as much as you can. Then, as the breath comes in, the belly expands slightly (on its own) in an outward direction as the diaphragm pushes down on the contents of the abdomen from above.
REFERENCES:   How Breathing Works
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Apply

 

38. What are the two Sanskrit root words for the word “pranayama,” and how do they relate to the practice of pranayama?

ANSWER:   Pranayama is the control of breath, from the Sanskrit prana, or life energy, and ayam, or control. Yoga teaches that interruption of the flow of prana by such factors as stress, toxins, or improper diet can have a harmful effect on physical, mental, and spiritual health. Pranayama breathing exercises are intended to remove such blockages. Pranayama exercises often emphasize slow, deep abdominal breathing.​
REFERENCES:   Culture Connection: Breath of Life
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Apply

 

39. From a breathing perspective, why is exercise so beneficial?

ANSWER:   When breathing is restricted, cells throughout the body do not receive an adequate supply of oxygen. When this happens, symptoms include drowsiness, irritability, and headache. One of the reasons exercise is so beneficial is that it forces you to breathe deeply and fully, thereby replenishing your supply of oxygen.
REFERENCES:   Benefits of Relaxation Breathing
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Understand

 

40. Why is being aware of how you breathe important in daily life?

ANSWER:   If you aren’t aware of how you are breathing, you can’t change it. Awareness of your current breathing is an important first step toward using breathing to activate the parasympathetic nervous system, and thereby immediately feel more relaxed.​
REFERENCES:   Breathing and Relaxation
OTHER:   Bloom’s: Evaluate

 

 

There are no reviews yet.

Add a review

Be the first to review “Stress Management for Life A Research Based Experiential Approach 4th Edition By Olpin – test Bank”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Category:
Updating…
  • No products in the cart.