Chapter 9 Safe Patient Handling, Transfer, and Positioning

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Chapter 9  Safe Patient Handling, Transfer, and Positioning

 

 

Complete Chapter Questions And Answers
 

Sample Questions

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

1. A nurse should be aware of safety measures to prevent personal injury when lifting or moving patients. An appropriate principle to follow is:
a.
bend at the waist for lifting.
b.
tighten the stomach muscles and pelvis.
c.
keep the weight to be lifted away from the body.
d.
carry or hold the weight 1 to 2 feet above the waist.

ANS: B
Tighten the stomach muscles and tuck the pelvis; this provides balance and protects the back. Bend at the knees; this helps to maintain the nurse’s center of gravity and lets the strong muscles of the legs do the lifting. Keep the weight to be lifted as close to the body as possible; this action places the weight in the same plane as the lifter and close to the center of gravity for balance.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: Text reference: p. 197
OBJ: Describe principles of safe patient transfer and positioning.
TOP: Principles of Lifting KEY: Nursing Process Step: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

2. The most prevalent and debilitating occupational health hazard among nurses is:
a.
footdrop.
b.
pressure ulcers.
c.
musculoskeletal disorders.
d.
contractures.

ANS: C
Musculoskeletal disorders are the most prevalent and debilitating occupational health hazard among nurses. Little improvement has been noted in the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries among health care workers. In 1989, 4.2 lost-workday injury cases per 100 were reported; in 2000, 4.1 cases per 100 were reported. Plantar flexion contracture or footdrop is a complication seen in bedridden patients. Pressure ulcers and contractures are complications that can develop in patients who do not maintain correct body alignment.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: Text reference: p. 198
OBJ: Describe body mechanics and its importance in caring for patients.
TOP: Risks for Nurses KEY: Nursing Process Step: Assessment
MSC: NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

3. The patient is an elderly male with severe kyphosis who is immobile from a stroke several years earlier. He has been admitted for severe dehydration. The nurse must turn the patient frequently to prevent complications of immobility. What does the nurse realize?
a.
This patient should be turned onto his back for meals.
b.
This patient may have to be turned more frequently than every 2 hours.
c.
This patient may be allowed to remain in his favorite position as long as he doesn’t complain of discomfort.
d.
Skin breakdown is not an issue for this patient.

ANS: B
Patients with underlying chronic conditions are at risk for skin breakdown and other hazards of immobility and as a result require more frequent position changes. A patient with severe kyphosis cannot lie supine or is unable to lift an object safely because the center of gravity is not aligned. Cluttered hallways and bedside areas increase the patient’s risk for falling. Dehydration or edema may require more frequent position changes because patients are prone to skin breakdown.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: Text reference: p. 198
OBJ: Describe principles of safe patient transfer and positioning.
TOP: Repositioning KEY: Nursing Process Step: Assessment
MSC: NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

4. Why does a nurse move a patient who has been confined to bed for a few days slowly from a sitting to a standing position?
a.
Fatigue
b.
Muscle injury
c.
Sensory disorientation
d.
Orthostatic hypotension

ANS: D
A patient who has been immobile for several days or longer may be weak or dizzy or may develop orthostatic hypotension (a drop in blood pressure) when transferred.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: Text reference: p. 199
OBJ: Describe principles of safe patient transfer and positioning.
TOP: Orthostatic Hypotension KEY: Nursing Process Step: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

5. A nurse is reviewing the patient assignment for the day. Of all the patients, which individual has the greatest potential for injury during transfers?
a.
Diabetes mellitus
b.
Myocardial infarction
c.
A cerebrovascular accident
d.
An upper extremity fracture

ANS: C
Certain conditions increase a patient’s risk for falling or potential for injury. Neuromuscular deficits, motor weakness, calcium loss from long bones, cognitive and visual dysfunction, and altered balance increase risk for injury. A diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, myocardial infarction, or upper extremity fracture does not increase the patient’s risk for injury.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: Text reference: p. 198
OBJ: Describe procedures for safely lifting patients. TOP: Cerebrovascular Accident
KEY: Nursing Process Step: Assessment MSC: NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

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