Chapter 19 Child Health Nursing Partnering With Children & Families, 3rd Edition

$2.50

Pay And Download The Complete Chapter Questions And Answers

Chapter 19  Child Health Nursing Partnering With Children & Families, 3rd Edition

 

 

Complete Chapter Questions And Answers
 

Sample Questions

 

Question 1
Type: MCSA
While teaching the parents of a newborn about infant care and feeding, the nurse instructs the parents to:
1. Delay supplemental foods until the infant is four to six months old.
2. Begin diluted fruit juice at two months of age, but wait three to five days before trying a new food.
3. Add rice cereal to the nighttime feeding if the infant is having difficulty sleeping after two months of age.
4. Delay supplemental foods until the infant reaches 15 pounds or greater.
Correct Answer: 1
Rationale 1: Age four to six months is the optimal age to begin supplemental feedings. The infant does not need supplemental foods earlier, and introducing supplemental foods earlier does not promote sleep.
Rationale 2: Fruit juice and rice cereal are not well tolerated by infants at two months of age, as they lack the digestive enzymes to take in and metabolize many food products.
Rationale 3: Fruit juice and rice cereal are not well tolerated by infants at two months of age, as they lack the digestive enzymes to take in and metabolize many food products. Introducing cereal at this stage will not help promote sleep.
Rationale 4: Earlier feeding of nonformula foods, regardless of the infant’s weight, is more likely to cause the development of food allergies.
Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need:
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: 19-1

Question 2
Type: MCSA
A nurse is talking to the mother of an exclusively breastfed, African American infant who is three months old and was born in late fall. The nurse would want to make sure that this child is receiving:
1. Iron
2. Vitamin D
3. Calcium
4. Fluoride
Correct Answer: 2
Rationale 1: An infant’s iron stores are usually adequate until about four to six months of age.
Rationale 2: This infant will have limited exposure to sunlight due to decreased sun exposure in the fall and winter months. The limited sun exposure combined with the infant’s dark skin means the infant may need additional vitamin D.
Rationale 3: The infant should be receiving sufficient amounts of calcium from breast milk.
Rationale 4: Fluoride supplementation, if needed, does not begin until the child is approximately six months old.
Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Analyzing
Client Need:
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning
Learning Outcome: 19-1

Question 3
Type: MCSA
While teaching parents of a newborn about normal growth and development, the nurse informs them that their child’s weight should:
1. Triple by nine months of age.
2. Double by five months of age.
3. Triple by six months of age.
4. Double by one year of age.
Correct Answer: 2
Rationale 1: The normal infant triples his birth weight by one year of age.
Rationale 2: It is expected that the infant would double in weight by five months of age.
Rationale 3: The child should double his birth weight by five months. A child whose weight triples by six months of age has gained weight too rapidly.
Rationale 4: The child should triple his birth weight by one year. This child may not be growing adequately.
Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need:
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: 19-1

Question 4
Type: MCSA
The nurse is teaching the parents of a four-month-old infant about good feeding habits. The nurse emphasizes the importance of holding the baby during feedings and not letting the infant go to sleep with the bottle, as this is most likely to increase the incidence of both dental caries and:
1. Aspiration.
2. Otitis media.
3. Malocclusion problems.
4. Sleeping disorders.
Correct Answer: 2
Rationale 1: There have been limited data to date showing a positive correlation to bottle propping and increased risk of aspiration.
Rationale 2: The infant’s Eustachian tube, which connects the throat to the middle ear, is shorter and straighter than an adult’s. When babies lie flat to feed, milk can easily enter the middle ear and increase the risk for otitis media.
Rationale 3: The primary concerns related to bottle propping are dental caries and otitis media. Poor dental alignment is not a significant problem.
Rationale 4: Sleeping disorders have not been found to be related to bottle propping.
Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need:
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: 19-1

 

There are no reviews yet.

Add a review

Be the first to review “Chapter 19 Child Health Nursing Partnering With Children & Families, 3rd Edition”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Category: Tag:
Updating…
  • No products in the cart.