Chapter 10 Parenteral Administration: Intradermal, Subcutaneous, and Intramuscular Routes

$2.50

Pay And Download The Complete Chapter Questions And Answers

Chapter 10  Parenteral Administration: Intradermal, Subcutaneous, and Intramuscular Routes

 

 

Complete Chapter Questions And Answers
 

Sample Questions

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

1. The nurse is educating a patient about diabetes. Based on recommendations from the American Diabetes Association, which statement by the nurse is best regarding site rotation?
a.
“Insulin injection sites should always be in the abdomen to ensure absorption into the stomach.”
b.
“It is important to rotate injection sites systematically within one area before progressing to a new site for injection.”
c.
“Following exercise, site rotation is not indicated because the circulation in the muscles will absorb the medication efficiently.”
d.
“If you aspirate, site rotation can be done every other day to avoid developing problems with absorption.”

ANS: B
The American Diabetes Association Clinical Practice recommendations include rotating injections systematically at one site before progressing to another. Insulin is not absorbed into the stomach. Failure to rotate sites can result in lipohypertrophy or lipoatrophy. When subcutaneous (subcut) insulin is administered, aspiration should never be performed.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: Page 132 OBJ: 2
TOP: Nursing Process Step: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Safe, Effective Care Environment
NOT: CONCEPT(S): Clinical Judgment; Safety; Patient Education

2. Which technique by the nurse is accurate when administering heparin to a thin, older adult patient?
a.
Aspirate before injecting the medication.
b.
Inject at a 45-degree angle.
c.
Inject at a 90-degree angle.
d.
Massage site following injection.

ANS: B
For thin individuals, the skin may need to be pinched and a 45-degree angle used to avoid administration into the muscle. Heparin should never be aspirated. Subcut injections are properly administered at a 45-degree angle. The injection site of heparin should never be massaged.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: Page 136 OBJ: 2
TOP: Nursing Process Step: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiological Integrity
NOT: CONCEPT(S): Clinical Judgment; Safety; Development

3. The nurse is preparing to administer kindergarten immunizations at the local health clinic. Which anatomic site would be best for the injection of the immunizations containing 0.5 mL?
a.
Rectus femoris
b.
Dorsogluteal
c.
Deltoid
d.
Ventrogluteal

ANS: C
The deltoid muscle is often used because of its easy access and the fact that it can tolerate 0.5 mL of medication volume. Having the child disrobe is not efficient in this setting.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: Page 138 | Page 139
OBJ: 5 TOP: Nursing Process Step: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiological Integrity
NOT: CONCEPT(S): Clinical Judgment; Safety; Development

4. A 65-year-old man who weighs 180 lb (81.8 kg) is to receive 1.5 mL of a viscous antibiotic by intramuscular (IM) injection. Which needle and syringe will be used?
a.
5/8 inch, 25-gauge needle with 5 mL syringe
b.
1 inch, 28-gauge needle with 4 mL syringe
c.
1 inch, 21-gauge needle with 3 mL syringe
d.
3 inch, 16-gauge needle with 1.5 mL syringe

ANS: C
It is important to correlate the syringe size to the size of the patient and the tissue mass. The usual amount injected intramuscularly is 0.5 to 2 mL. Needle lengths commonly used for adults are 1 to 1 inches long. A longer needle may be used for a significantly obese adult. Commonly used needle gauges for IM injections are 20 to 22 gauge. A 5/8 inch, 25-gauge needle is too short and too small to administer a viscous medication. A 1 inch, 28-gauge needle is too small to administer a viscous medication. A 3 inch, 16-gauge needle is too large and too long to administer medication to a patient this size.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: Page 136 OBJ: 3
TOP: Nursing Process Step: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiological Integrity
NOT: CONCEPT(S): Clinical Judgment; Safety

5. Which is the preferred IM site for injecting a 6-month-old child?
a.
Dorsogluteal
b.
Abdominal
c.
Vastus lateralis
d.
Deltoid muscle

ANS: C
The vastus lateralis is generally the preferred IM site in infants because it has the largest muscle mass for that age group. The muscles are not well developed in other areas for this age group. The dorsogluteal muscle is not developed well enough in a child this age to provide a safe site for injection. The abdominal muscles are not appropriate for IM injection. The deltoid muscle is not developed well enough in a child this age to provide a safe site for injection.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge REF: Page 137 OBJ: 5
TOP: Nursing Process Step: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiological Integrity
NOT: CONCEPT(S): Clinical Judgment; Safety; Development

There are no reviews yet.

Add a review

Be the first to review “Chapter 10 Parenteral Administration: Intradermal, Subcutaneous, and Intramuscular Routes”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Category: Tag:
Updating…
  • No products in the cart.