America The Essential Learning Edition 1st Edition by David E. Shi – Test Bank

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CHAPTER 05: The American Revolution, 1776-1783

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. The first conflicts of the American Revolution took place in South Carolina.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 155

OBJ:   1. Explain the challenges faced by both British and American military leaders in fighting the Revolutionary War.           TOP:              Washington’s Narrow Escape

 

  1. Thomas Paine’s pamphlet The American Crisis gave the colonists inspiration with the line, “These are times that try men’s souls.”

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 155

OBJ:   1. Explain the challenges faced by both British and American military leaders in fighting the Revolutionary War.           TOP:              Washington’s Narrow Escape

 

  1. Desertion was a big problem for Washington’s army during the Revolution.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 157

OBJ:   1. Explain the challenges faced by both British and American military leaders in fighting the Revolutionary War.           TOP:              Winter in Morristown

 

  1. Before the Revolution was over, the British were fighting the Spanish, the French, and the Dutch, as well as the Americans.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 161

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                           TOP:              Alliance with France

 

  1. In 1778, Parliament adopted a program that granted all the American demands made before independence.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 161

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                           TOP:              Alliance with France

 

  1. After 1778, most of the fighting in the Revolution was done in the South.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 164

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                            TOP:              The War Moves South

 

  1. Benedict Arnold, originally a British officer, switched to the American side halfway through the war.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 167

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                           TOP:              A War of Endurance

 

  1. The Treaty of Paris granted the United States unquestioned claim to Florida.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 168

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                           TOP:              The Treaty of Paris (1783)

 

  1. During the Revolution, Loyalists came exclusively from the elite ranks of society.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 171

OBJ:   3. Describe the ways in which the American Revolution was also a civil war.

TOP:   Choosing Sides

 

  1. Many Loyalists emigrated from the American colonies during and after the American Revolution.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   pp. 171–172

OBJ:   3. Describe the ways in which the American Revolution was also a civil war.

TOP:   The Loyalists Flee

 

  1. The Articles of Confederation left many powers to the states.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 174

OBJ:   4. Examine how the Revolutionary War was an “engine” for political and social change.

TOP:   The Articles of Confederation

 

  1. Under the Articles of Confederation, some legislative measures required different majorities for approval.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 174

OBJ:   4. Examine how the Revolutionary War was an “engine” for political and social change.

TOP:   The Articles of Confederation

 

  1. The Anglican Church became the Episcopal Church after the American Revolution.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 175

OBJ:   4. Examine how the Revolutionary War was an “engine” for political and social change.

TOP:   Freedom of Religion

 

  1. Thomas Jefferson was the most notable Virginian to free his slaves during the Revolution.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 176

OBJ:   5. Compare the impact of the Revolutionary War on African Americans, women, and Native Americans.   TOP:           The Paradox of Slavery

 

  1. During the war, Iroquois tribes like the Mohawks helped the Americans fight against the British.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 178

OBJ:   5. Compare the impact of the Revolutionary War on African Americans, women, and Native Americans.   TOP:           Native Americans and the Revolution

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Which of the following is not a challenge the British faced in fighting the American Revolution?
a. Supplying the British troops
b. The fact that the colonies were so far away
c. The lack of a coherent strategy
d. The wealth of British troops
e. The diversity of the British forces

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 152

OBJ:   1. Explain the challenges faced by both British and American military leaders in fighting the Revolutionary War.           NAT:              Comparisons and Connections

TOP:   Military History | Mobilizing for War                                MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The British troops during the American Revolutionary War included all of the following groups except
a. Hessians.
b. Native Americans.
c. Whigs.
d. African Americans.
e. American Loyalists.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 152

OBJ:   1. Explain the challenges faced by both British and American military leaders in fighting the Revolutionary War.           NAT:              Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Military History | Mobilizing for War                                MSC:  Applying

 

  1. How did the British army supply its troops in the colonies?
a. Supplies were shipped from Britain.
b. They relied on the Native Americans for supplies.
c. They foraged for supplies.
d. Everything they needed was supplied by British Loyalists.
e. The Germans supplied the needed provisions.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 152

OBJ:   1. Explain the challenges faced by both British and American military leaders in fighting the Revolutionary War.           NAT:              Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Military History | Mobilizing for War                                MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Which statement is incorrect regarding the Continental army during the American Revolution?
a. The American troops lost often.
b. The Patriots were well disciplined.
c. The Continental army lacked funds.
d. The American troops had few of the necessities needed to make war.
e. Washington’s troops had little martial experience.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 152

OBJ:   1. Explain the challenges faced by both British and American military leaders in fighting the Revolutionary War.           NAT:              Comparisons and Connections

TOP:   Military History | The Continental Army                           MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Of the following, which statement best describes the average Patriot soldier?
a. Middle class artisans and merchants
b. Disciplined volunteers
c. Experienced, professional soldiers
d. Poor farmers and former indentured servants
e. Members of the upper class

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 152

OBJ:   1. Explain the challenges faced by both British and American military leaders in fighting the Revolutionary War.           NAT:              Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Military History | The Continental Army                           MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Washington, as the army’s leader, believed that
a. disciplined citizen-soldiers were the key to winning the war.
b. a decisive and staggering victory was needed.
c. the Native Americans’ allegiance would turn the tide.
d. the Continental army should also hire mercenaries.
e. all he had to do was wait for disease to decimate the British troops.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 153

OBJ:   1. Explain the challenges faced by both British and American military leaders in fighting the Revolutionary War.           NAT:              Historical Documents

TOP:   Military History | The Continental Army                           MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. During the American Revolutionary War, the Iroquois Confederacy
a. was divided in its policies toward the Patriots and British.
b. allied with the British.
c. allied the Continental army.
d. remained neutral.
e. withdrew to Canada for the duration of the war.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 153

OBJ:   1. Explain the challenges faced by both British and American military leaders in fighting the Revolutionary War.           NAT:              Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Military History | Native Americans and the Revolutionary War

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. General Howe, the British commander, believed he could defeat the Americans by
a. cutting off outside support to the colonies.
b. taking control of the countryside.
c. offering the colonists money to switch sides.
d. slowly wearing down the Continental army.
e. defeating Washington and his troops in a single decisive battle.

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 156

OBJ:   1. Explain the challenges faced by both British and American military leaders in fighting the Revolutionary War.           NAT:              Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Military History | Strategy of Evasion                               MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. All of the following were British generals during the Revolutionary War, except
a. Thomas Gage.
b. William Howe.
c. Charles Cornwallis.
d. John Burgoyne.
e. Horatio Gates.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 158

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                           NAT:             Change and Continuity

TOP:   Military History | Setbacks for the British                          MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The Battle of Saratoga was particularly significant because
a. it demonstrated General Burgoyne’s incompetence.
b. the outnumbered Americans defeated the superior British troops.
c. it resulted in an alliance between the Americans and the French.
d. this quick victory showed American superiority.
e. the British routed the Americans.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 159

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                           NAT:             Change and Continuity

TOP:   Military History | The Campaign of 1777                          MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. After 1778, the following countries allied with the United States.
a. Spain, Canada, and the Netherlands
b. France, Spain, and Germany
c. France, Spain, and the Dutch
d. France, Spain, and the Netherlands
e. France, Spain, and Canada

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 159

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                           NAT:             Historical Documents

TOP:   Military History | The Alliance with France                       MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. In response to the Battle of Saratoga, Britain’s Lord North
a. offered to surrender if the Americans would remain a part of the British Empire.
b. offered to comply with earlier American demands in return for an end to the war.
c. threatened to annihilate the Americans if they did not surrender.
d. agreed to listen to the American complaints.
e. allied with the Spanish.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 159

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                           NAT:             Change and Continuity

TOP:   Military History | The Alliance with France                       MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Which of the following was a bloodless victory for the Americans?
a. Camden
b. Charleston
c. Cahokia
d. Cowpens
e. Kaskaskia

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 162

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                           NAT:             Change and Continuity

TOP:   Military History | War in the West    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. According to your textbook, the Battle of King’s Mountain was significant because
a. it was the first time family fought family in the conflict.
b. it showed that the British could be defeated.
c. the war became much more brutal after this battle.
d. the battle raged for months and exhausted both sides.
e. after this battle, the British found recruiting southern Loyalists almost impossible.

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 165

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                           NAT:             Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Military History | The Battle of King’s Mountain               MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. The Battle of Yorktown
a. was a combined Franco-American victory over the British.
b. was won by General Cornwallis.
c. would have been an American victory even without France’s aid.
d. ended with General Cornwallis’s escape.
e. saw the French fleet defeated.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 167

OBJ:   2. Identify key turning points in the Revolutionary War, and explain how they changed the direction of the war.                                           NAT:             Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Military History | Yorktown             MSC:  Applying

 

  1. During the American Revolution, those loyal to the British crown were often called
a. Patriots.
b. Whigs.
c. Tories.
d. Hessians.
e. Subjects.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 170

OBJ:   3. Describe the ways in which the American Revolution was also a civil war.

NAT:  Historical Documents                      TOP:   Military History| Choosing Sides

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. During the American Revolutionary War, colonists divided into which three groups?
a. Tories, Patriots, and the undecided middle
b. Tories, Loyalists, and King’s Men
c. Patriots, Whigs, and Tories
d. King’s Men, Tories, and the undecided middle
e. Patriots, King’s Men, and Loyalists

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 170

OBJ:   3. Describe the ways in which the American Revolution was also a civil war.

NAT:  Change and Continuity                    TOP:   Military History | Choosing Sides

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Which of the following segments of colonial American society did not find itself choosing a side during the American Revolution?
a. English families
b. English churches
c. Hessians
d. Native Americans
e. African slaves

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 170

OBJ:   3. Describe the ways in which the American Revolution was also a civil war.

NAT:  Change and Continuity                    TOP:   Military History | Choosing Sides

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. By the end of the American Revolution, all American Patriots realized
a. a true democracy was impossible.
b. the British monarchy could be modified.
c. separation and republican government were the only true protections of liberty.
d. being subjects of the British Crown was tolerable.
e. that the revolution was treasonous.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 170

OBJ:   3. Describe the ways in which the American Revolution was also a civil war.

NAT:  Change and Continuity                    TOP:   Military History | Choosing Sides

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which statement among the following is most accurate?
a. Loyalists were often city folk and Catholics.
b. Loyalists were most often Philadelphians.
c. Loyalists hated Anglicans.
d. Loyalists came from all over the colonies, but especially seaports.
e. Loyalists feared the English constitution.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 171

OBJ:   3. Describe the ways in which the American Revolution was also a civil war.

NAT:  Change and Continuity                    TOP:   Military History | Choosing Sides

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Throughout the American Revolution, Loyalists did all of the following except
a. fight for the British Army.
b. pledge to aid the United States.
c. flee to Canada.
d. petition to remain part of the British Empire.
e. pledge allegiance to Britain.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   pp. 171–172

OBJ:   3. Describe the ways in which the American Revolution was also a civil war.

NAT:  Historical Interpretations                 TOP:   Military History | Choosing Sides

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. When Loyalists fled to Canada
a. the American government compensated them for their lost property.
b. they left all runaway slaves behind.
c. their return was courted by the United States.
d. the American government confiscated their abandoned property.
e. their departure went unnoticed.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 172

OBJ:   3. Describe the ways in which the American Revolution was also a civil war.

NAT:  Change and Continuity                    TOP:   Military History | Choosing Sides

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. As a result of the War for Independence, after the war
a. Americans enjoyed more freedoms.
b. Americans had fewer freedoms.
c. Americans were much worse off.
d. Americans’ lives were exactly the same.
e. Americans noticed no changes.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   pp. 172–174

OBJ:   4. Examine how the Revolutionary War was an “engine” for political and social change.

NAT:  Historical Period                             TOP:   Military History | War as an Engine of Change

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The government of the United States of America established by the revolutionaries is best described as
a. a limited monarchy.
b. an aristocracy.
c. an oligarchy.
d. a representative democracy.
e. a direct democracy.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 173

OBJ:   4. Examine how the Revolutionary War was an “engine” for political and social change.

NAT:  Historical Period                             TOP:   Political History | Republican Ideology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. When the American Revolutionary War ended, the predominant type of government in Europe was
a. monarchy.
b. aristocracy.
c. oligarchy.
d. democracy.
e. tyranny.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 173

OBJ:   4. Examine how the Revolutionary War was an “engine” for political and social change.

NAT:  Historical Period                             TOP:   Political History | Republican Ideology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. According to your textbook, the most unique result of the American Revolutionary ideology was
a. the reduction in tariffs.
b. the appearance of state governments and state constitutions.
c. the appointment of state governors and councils.
d. the increased powers of the state courts.
e. the formation of a cohesive federal government.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 173

OBJ:   4. Examine how the Revolutionary War was an “engine” for political and social change.

NAT:  Events and Processes                       TOP:   Political History | State Governments

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The national government, under the Articles of Confederation, could do all of the following except
a. start a war.
b. end a war.
c. levy taxes.
d. issue coinage.
e. make treaties.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 174

OBJ:   4. Examine how the Revolutionary War was an “engine” for political and social change.

NAT:  Change and Continuity                    TOP:   Political History | The Articles of Confederation

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. In the aftermath of the Revolutionary War, Americans
a. relied upon the English model of limited monarchy.
b. turned to Europe for advice and financial aid.
c. found society largely unchanged.
d. embraced a new, energetic sense of nationality.
e. offered equality to Native Americans.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 175

OBJ:   4. Examine how the Revolutionary War was an “engine” for political and social change.

NAT:  Change and Continuity                    TOP:   Social History | A Social Revolution

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The concept of freedom of religion
a. was always present in British colonies.
b. appeared only after the start of the American Revolution.
c. was copied from the French.
d. included the Native American faiths.
e. ignored Catholicism.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 175

OBJ:   4. Examine how the Revolutionary War was an “engine” for political and social change.

NAT:  Events and Processes                       TOP:   Civil Rights | Freedom of Religion

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Which statement regarding black participation in the American Revolution is most accurate?
a. The American government rewarded slaves who fought with their freedom.
b. All American states refused to let any black fight.
c. The British kept their promises and freed thousands of runaway slaves who fought for them.
d. Washington and Jefferson were comfortable with the idea of slaves fighting for America.
e. American slave masters trusted their slaves to be loyal.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 176

OBJ:   5. Compare the impact of the Revolutionary War on African Americans, women, and Native Americans.   NAT:           Historical Documents

TOP:   Social History | The Paradox of Slavery                             MSC:  Applying

 

  1. During the American Revolutionary War, the British tried to recruit African slaves to fight against their colonial masters. This policy
a. worked well; hundreds of thousands of slaves were freed.
b. convinced Patriots that slavery was wrong.
c. only worked in the North.
d. backfired as southerners took up arms to protect their property from the British.
e. was stopped by the French.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   pp. 176–177

OBJ:   5. Compare the impact of the Revolutionary War on African Americans, women, and Native Americans.   NAT:           Historical Documents

TOP:   Civil Rights | The Paradox of Slavery                                MSC:  Applying

 

  1. At the end of the American Revolution, all of the following held true for American women, except
a. women could not vote.
b. women could preach.
c. women were less educated than men.
d. women could not buy or sell property.
e. women could hold elected office.

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 177

OBJ:   5. Compare the impact of the Revolutionary War on African Americans, women, and Native Americans.   NAT:           Historical Documents

TOP:   Divergent Viewpoint | The Status of Women                     MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Of the following statements, which most accurately describes the status of women after the end of the Revolutionary War?
a. All women found their lives greatly improved as a result of the war, especially politically.
b. Women experienced no changes in status as a result of the war.
c. As a result of the war, American women had fewer rights than ever before.
d. Some women, as a result of the war, began to question their place in American society.
e. The war made traditional gender roles even more appealing to women.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   pp. 177–178

OBJ:   5. Compare the impact of the Revolutionary War on African Americans, women, and Native Americans.   NAT:           Change and Continuity

TOP:   Divergent Viewpoint | The Status of Women                     MSC:  Applying

 

  1. During the American Revolutionary War, most of the Native American tribes
a. chose to ally with the Americans.
b. chose to ally with the British.
c. chose to try and remain neutral.
d. moved to new territories.
e. saw their lives get better.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 178

OBJ:   5. Compare the impact of the Revolutionary War on African Americans, women, and Native Americans.   NAT:           Change and Continuity

TOP:   Divergent Viewpoint | Native Americans and the Revolution

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Patriot leader and future president John Adams believed that giving more rights to women
a. would increase liberty within the American republic.
b. would lead to blacks and Native Americans also demanding rights.
c. would protect America’s future.
d. was only logical.
e. was necessary.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 178

OBJ:   5. Compare the impact of the Revolutionary War on African Americans, women, and Native Americans.   NAT:           Historical Documents

TOP:   Divergent Viewpoint | The Status of Women                     MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. During the American Revolution, Abigail Adams wrote to her husband John and
a. asked that women be given greater liberties and protections.
b. asked for the right to vote.
c. asked for easier access to divorce for women.
d. asked for legal equality between all men and women.
e. asked for an end to spousal abuse.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 178

OBJ:   5. Compare the impact of the Revolutionary War on African Americans, women, and Native Americans.   NAT:           Historical Documents

TOP:   Divergent Viewpoint | Status of Women                            MSC:  Remembering

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Describe the challenges the American military leaders faced in the areas of finance, supplies, and troops during the Revolution. How did Americans attempt to solve these problems? How successful were they?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. In what ways were the campaigns in the North different from those in the South?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Discuss the validity of the following assertion: “Without the cooperation of the French, American victory in the Revolution would not have been possible.”

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Discuss the social effects of the Revolution. In what areas was the revolutionary promise or spirit most fulfilled? In what areas was it least fulfilled?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Describe the basic military strategy (or strategies) of the two sides during the Revolution. How might the British have been more successful?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Discuss the choices colonists had to make concerning which side to support during the American Revolution.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. What were the turning points in the American Revolution? Discuss the changes that resulted and how they affected the direction of the war.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Write an essay discussing the challenges faced by the British military in the American Revolution. Why did the British ultimately lose the war?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Discuss the Treaty of Paris (1783), which ended the American Revolution. Describe the negotiations and terms of the treaty, as well as its future implications.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. How revolutionary was the American Revolution? Discuss the political, social, and religious changes that resulted.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

MATCHING

 

Match each person with one of the following descriptions.

a. Provided Washington key assistance at Yorktown
b. Wrote The American Crisis
c. Held the army together at Valley Forge
d. Was the American commander in the South known as the “fighting Quaker”
e. Was a brutal British leader in the South
f. Was a major American peace negotiator
g. Lost at Saratoga
h. Won at Saratoga
i. Surrendered at Yorktown
j. Ended Benedict Arnold’s plot and was hanged as a spy

 

 

  1. General Cornwallis

 

  1. John Burgoyne

 

  1. Benjamin Franklin

 

  1. Horatio Gates

 

  1. Admiral de Grasse

 

  1. George Washington

 

  1. Thomas Paine

 

  1. Nathanael Greene

 

  1. Banastre Tarleton

 

  1. John André

 

  1. ANS:  I                     PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  G                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  F                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  H                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  A                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  C                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  B                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  D                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  E                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  J                     PTS:   1

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER 18: Society and Politics in the Gilded Age, 1865-1900

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. The spread of mass transit was a major factor in the growth of the suburbs.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 627

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           TOP:           Growth in All Directions

 

  1. Tenement housing gave city dwellers substantially healthier and more comfortable living conditions.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   pp. 628–629

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           TOP:           Crowds, Dirt, and Disease

 

  1. One major task in big cities was disposing of horse waste.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 629

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           TOP:           Crowds, Dirt, and Disease

 

  1. As late as 1900, most New York City residents were still native-born Americans.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 630

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. TOP:           A Surge of Newcomers from Europe

 

  1. The peak decade of immigration was the 1890s.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 630

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. TOP:           A Surge of Newcomers from Europe

 

  1. In major cities, politics was often a form of public entertainment.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 633

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.

TOP:   Changes in Popular and Intellectual Culture

 

  1. Saloons were the poor man’s social clubs during the late 19th century.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 634

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.

TOP:   Urban Leisure and Entertainment Options

 

  1. Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species put forward the theory of evolution.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 635

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     TOP:   The Impact of Darwinism

 

  1. Charles Darwin coined the phrase “survival of the fittest.”

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 636

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     TOP:   Social Darwinism

 

  1. Politics in the late 19th century was dominated by a series of strong presidents.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 640

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           TOP:              Gilded Age Politics

 

  1. Throughout the Gilded Age, the Democrats controlled both houses of Congress.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 641

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           TOP:              Partisan Politics at the National Level

 

  1. During the Gilded Age, voter turnout was significantly higher than it is today.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   pp. 641–642

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           TOP:              Partisan Politics at the National Level

 

  1. James Garfield was the first southerner to be elected president since the Civil War.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   pp. 644–645

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         TOP:   Garfield, Arthur, and the Pendleton Act

 

  1. Mugwumps tended to oppose civil service reform.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 647

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         TOP:   Corruption and a Sex Scandal

 

  1. When first created, the ICC was too weak to regulate the railroads effectively.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   pp. 648–649

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         TOP:   Regulation of Railroad Rates

 

  1. As president, Benjamin Harrison supported generous pensions for veterans.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   pp. 649–650

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         TOP:   Republican Activism under Harrison

 

  1. Farmers were generally hurt by the high tariff.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 651

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. TOP:   A Vicious Cycle of Depressed Prices and Debt

 

  1. The Grange was the leading farm organization through the 1890s.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 653

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. TOP:   Farmers’ Alliances

 

  1. The Farmers’ Alliances were strongest in the Midwest and Northeast.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 653

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. TOP:   Farmers’ Alliances

 

  1. The Farmers’ Alliances accepted black members.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 653

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. TOP:   Farmers’ Alliances

 

  1. In 1896, the Republican party supported the gold standard.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 656

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. TOP:   Silverites versus Goldbugs

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. During the period immediately following the Civil War, major cities in the United States
a. experienced growth, sometimes up to four times their original population.
b. suffered from the post-war recession, as factory workers returned to their farms.
c. experienced a crime wave as prohibition became legal.
d. passed bonds to finance internal improvements to help rebuild their destroyed trade centers.
e. created Freedmen’s Bureaus to provide economic assistance to the newly freed slaves.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 626

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           NAT:           Historical Period

TOP:   Economic Development | Introduction                               MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which of the following was not a reason to move to the cities during the Gilded Age?
a. The introduction of agricultural machinery made it possible for one farmer to do more.
b. The demand for jobs occurred in urban areas, thus causing people to move there.
c. Tenant farming removed prime land from the agricultural economy, thus causing the loss of jobs.
d. Life was more exciting in cities.
e. Cities sprung up around major landmarks, like mines and rail yards.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 626

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           NAT:           Events and Processes

TOP:   Social History | America’s Move to Town                         MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. One of the major downsides of urban dwelling during the Gilded Age was
a. a rise in sicknesses as a result of the overcrowding of living conditions in the cities.
b. a rise in crime caused by the sheer amount of people in the area.
c. the lack of space forced homes to be too expensive to purchase for most people.
d. cultural clashes between people of different ethnicities that were forced into close proximity with one another.
e. the lack of available health care professionals for those who needed them.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 627

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           NAT:           Events and Processes

TOP:   Social History | America’s Move to Town                         MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. In the 1870s, what invention allowed the construction of large apartment buildings to become significantly cheaper?
a. The sawmill
b. Steam radiators
c. Steel
d. Oil-burning furnaces
e. The automatic chimney sweep

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 627

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           NAT:           Historical Period

TOP:   Social History | Growth in All Directions                          MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Which of the following did not aid the construction of taller buildings in the Gilded Age?
a. Steam radiators
b. Elevators
c. Steel frames
d. Cast iron frames
e. Coal-burning furnaces

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 627

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           NAT:           Change and Continuity

TOP:   Social History | Growth in All Directions                          MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. What invention did not ease the ability of people to live outside of major urban areas yet still work there?
a. The automobile
b. Cable cars
c. Elevated steam trains
d. Electric trolleys
e. Commuter trains

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 627

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           NAT:           Change and Continuity

TOP:   Social History | Growth in All Directions                          MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Overcrowded, filthy, and poorly maintained ___________ were where the poor of the urban areas lived.
a. tenements
b. government housing
c. central housing authorities
d. colonias
e. skyscrapers

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 628

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           NAT:           Change and Continuity

TOP:   Cultural History | Crowds, Dirt, and Disease MSC:              Analyzing

 

  1. One of the first areas were people began to be interested in reforming society was aimed at
a. the subways.
b. the lack of sewers.
c. the tenements.
d. government corruption.
e. reforming hospital conditions.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 629

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           NAT:           Events and Processes

TOP:   Cultural History | Crowds, Dirt, and Disease MSC:              Evaluating

 

  1. Cholera, typhoid fever, and yellow fever were often the result in urban areas of
a. overcrowding.
b. poor sanitation.
c. lack of understanding as to what caused the diseases.
d. mosquitoes.
e. poor hygiene amongst the poor.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 629

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           NAT:           Historical Period

TOP:   Cultural History | Crowds, Dirt, and Disease MSC:              Understanding

 

  1. Which of the following was not a way early reformers suggested to improve conditions in the cities during the Gilded Age?
a. Replace horse drawn trolleys with electric
b. Move hog farms out of the city
c. Move cattle farms out of the city
d. Establish zoning ordinances to control for urban growth
e. Require slaughterhouses to be outside the city

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 629

OBJ:   1. Understand the effects of urban growth during the Gilded Age, including the problems it created.           NAT:           Events and Processes

TOP:   Social History | Crowds, Dirt, and Disease                         MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. By 1900, what percentage of the residents in major cities was foreign born?
a. 10 percent
b. 30 percent
c. 50 percent
d. 70 percent
e. 90 percent

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 630

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. NAT:           Change and Continuity

TOP:   Ethnicity | The New Immigration     MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. What made immigration different in the time between 1860 and 1920 than in previous years?
a. The immigrants tended to come from eastern and southern Europe.
b. The immigrants tended to come from western and northern Europe.
c. The immigrants tended to come from Central America.
d. Fewer immigrants tended to come than before.
e. The United States enacted restrictions to prevent what were considered undesirable individuals from immigrating.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 630

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. NAT:           Historical Period

TOP:   Cultural History | A Surge of Newcomers from Europe      MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. What segment of the economy was not actively engaged in recruiting newly arrived immigrants during the Gilded Age?
a. Agriculture
b. Mining
c. Textile mills
d. Railroad companies
e. Factories

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 630

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. NAT:           Events and Processes

TOP:   Cultural History | A Surge of Newcomers from Europe      MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. In 1885, the United States government stopped
a. companies from recruiting immigrant workers at the ports when they arrived.
b. companies from paying to import workers from outside the nation.
c. immigrants from writing their families to tell them about job opportunities in America.
d. the Ku Klux Klan from recruiting within tenements.
e. Chinese immigrants immigrating to California.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 631

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. NAT:           Historical Period

TOP:   Economic Development | A Surge of Newcomers from Europe

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Immigrants who arrived before 1890 to the United States were primarily
a. Roman Catholic.
b. Jewish.
c. Protestant.
d. Eastern Orthodox.
e. Muslim.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 631

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. NAT:           Change and Continuity

TOP:   Cultural History | A Surge of Newcomers from Europe      MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. The new immigrants that arrived after 1890 to the United States were not primarily
a. Roman Catholic.
b. Jewish.
c. Protestant.
d. Eastern Orthodox.
e. Muslim.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 631

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. NAT:           Historical Period

TOP:   Cultural History | A Surge of Newcomers from Europe      MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. A major concern toward those labeled “new immigrants” was
a. that they brought with them diseases from the old world.
b. that they were primarily socialists.
c. that they resisted assimilation.
d. that they were competing with native-born Americans for highly skilled jobs.
e. that they were unwilling to work and therefore a drain on society.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 631

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. NAT:           Events and Processes

TOP:   Cultural History | A Surge of Newcomers from Europe      MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Native-born Americans who saw the influx of new immigrants to the United States with concern were called
a. racists.
b. nativists.
c. the American party.
d. muckrakers.
e. mugwumps.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 632

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. NAT:           Historical Period

TOP:   Cultural History | The Nativist Response                           MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. The first federal law passed to restrict immigration on the basis of race was
a. The Anti-Irish Immigration Act.
b. The German Exclusion Act.
c. The Anti-Polish Immigration Act.
d. The Chinese Exclusion Act.
e. The Eastern Orthodox Anti-Immigration Act.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 633

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. NAT:           Events and Processes

TOP:   Cultural History | The Nativist Response                           MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. What organization was formed to prevent the Anglo-Saxon “race” from being “contaminated”?
a. Immigration Restriction League
b. Ku Klux Klan
c. The American Party
d. The Anti-Mason League
e. The Workers Progress Association

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 633

OBJ:   2. Describe the “new immigrants” of the late 19th century and how they were viewed by American society. NAT:           Events and Processes

TOP:   Cultural History | The Nativist Response                           MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. What was not a cause of the changes in recreation and leisure in the Gilded Age?
a. Urbanization
b. Immigration
c. Changes in technology
d. Increases in wealth
e. Sanitation improvements

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 633

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     NAT:  Historical Period

TOP:   Cultural History | Changes in Popular and Intellectual Culture

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. As labor unions became more common during the Gilded Age, what other aspect did they take on in the lives of their members?
a. They provided social activities.
b. They provided economic advancement through leadership roles.
c. They provided educational activities.
d. They provided industrial activities.
e. They provided opportunities to participate in the political process.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 634

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     NAT:  Change and Continuity

TOP:   Cultural History | Urban Leisure and Entertainment Options

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. What was an example of the new types of entertainment that became popular during the Gilded Age?
a. Opera
b. Attending the theater
c. Wild West traveling shows
d. Boxing
e. Labor unions

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 634

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     NAT:  Historical Period

TOP:   Cultural History | Urban Leisure and Entertainment Options

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. In the cities, what helped spur the development of professional sporting events?
a. Streetcars
b. Public organizers
c. Mass media campaigns
d. Radio broadcasts
e. The rise of the sports sections in newspapers

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 634

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     NAT:  Events and Processes

TOP:   Economic History | Urban Leisure and Entertainment Options

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The most popular leisure destinations for the urban working class during the Gilded Age were
a. football stadiums.
b. vaudeville halls.
c. movie theaters.
d. saloons.
e. opera halls.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 634

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     NAT:  Events and Processes

TOP:   Cultural History | Urban Leisure and Entertainment Options

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. During the Gilded Age, temperance organizations were best associated with
a. the Republican party.
b. the Democrat party.
c. saloons.
d. the Immigration Restriction League.
e. vaudeville halls.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 634

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     NAT:  Historical Period

TOP:   Cultural History | Urban Leisure and Entertainment Options

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Because of the amount of free time available to workingmen during the Gilded Age, “talking ______” became a popular hobby.
a. shop
b. politics
c. work
d. women
e. life

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 634

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     NAT:  Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Social History | Urban Leisure and Entertainment Options

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. What did one journalist call “the social and intellectual center of the neighborhood” during the Gilded Age in large cities?
a. The Republican party
b. The Democrat party
c. Saloons
d. The Immigration Restriction League
e. Vaudeville halls

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 635

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     NAT:  Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Cultural History | Urban Leisure and Entertainment Options

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Perhaps the most profound work of science published during the latter half of the 19th century was
a. Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species.
b. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
c. Alexis de Tocqueville’s Thoughts on America.
d. Carl Sagan’s Cosmos.
e. Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 635

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     NAT:  Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Social History | The Impact of Darwinism                         MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The concept of “survival of the fittest” being applied to human society was introduced by
a. Albert Schweitzer.
b. Charles Darwin.
c. Herbert Spencer.
d. John Aubrey.
e. William Churchill.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 636

OBJ:   3. Explain how urban growth and the increasingly important role of science influenced leisure activities, cultural life, and social policy in the Gilded Age.     NAT:  Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Social History | The Impact of Darwinism                         MSC:  Applying

 

  1. During the Gilded Age the real leaders of the United States could be said to be
a. the Supreme Court.
b. the labor unions.
c. corporations.
d. Congress.
e. the president.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 640

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           NAT:              Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Political History | Gilded Age Politics                               MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. One of the most notorious of the robber barons was
a. Woodrow Wilson.
b. Jay Gould.
c. J. P. Morgan.
d. Wilt Chamberlain.
e. P. J. O’Rourke.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 640

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           NAT:              Historical Period

TOP:   Political History | Gilded Age Politics                               MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Unlike today, citizens during the Gilded Age expected the ___________ to have little to no effect on their daily lives.
a. state government
b. local government
c. city government
d. federal government
e. municipal government

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 640

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           NAT:              Events and Processes

TOP:   Political History | Local Politics and Party Loyalties          MSC:  Applying

 

  1. A common occurrence during the Gilded Age of politics was that members of Congress often
a. accepted bribes.
b. made campaign speeches.
c. blocked pieces of legislation that they did not like.
d. promoted the general welfare of their district.
e. refused to run for re-election.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 640

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           NAT:              Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Political History | Gilded Age Politics                               MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. In cities during the Gilded Age, the political process was usually controlled by ________, and their organizations were known as _________.
a. kings, realms
b. bosses, machines
c. captains, warrens
d. chairs, precincts
e. leaders, organizations

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 641

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           NAT:              Events and Processes

TOP:   Political History | Gilded Age Politics                               MSC:  Applying

 

  1. This power meant that those newly elected could appoint people to jobs in their sphere of authority.
a. Politics
b. Plutarch
c. Patronage
d. Prescient
e. Paternalism

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 641

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           NAT:              Events and Processes

TOP:   Political History | Gilded Age Politics                               MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. One of the ways politics in the Gilded Age was different than today was that
a. voters were divided into two groups.
b. voters voted for the same party, year after year, regardless of the candidate.
c. education levels decided which party one was affiliated with.
d. the more money you had, the more likely you were to be involved with politics.
e. the more education you had, the more likely you were to be involved with politics.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 641

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           NAT:              Historical Period

TOP:   Political History | Partisan Politics at the National Level     MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. The practice by Republicans of reminding voters who caused the Civil War was known as
a. remembrance.
b. memorialization.
c. waving the bloody shirt.
d. abolitionism.
e. patronage.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 642

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           NAT:              Historical Period

TOP:   Political History | Partisan Politics at the National Level     MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. What affected African Americans’ rights to vote in the South during the Gilded Age?
a. The passage of the Fifteenth Amendment removed their right to vote.
b. Jim Crow Laws removed their right to vote.
c. The passage of the Thirteenth Amendment gave them the right to vote.
d. The Supreme Court ruled that property cannot vote.
e. Congress passed a law giving them the right to vote for president.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 642

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           NAT:              Change and Continuity

TOP:   Political History | Partisan Politics at the National Level     MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. Republican Protestants during the Gilded Age had a tendency to consider __________ the central social evil in the United States.
a. Democrats
b. saloons
c. immigrants
d. theaters
e. brothels

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 642

OBJ:   4. Assess how the nature of politics during the Gilded Age contributed to political corruption and stalemate.           NAT:              Historical Period

TOP:   Political History | Partisan Politics at the National Level     MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Because of the excesses of the Gilded Age, a major period of ________ occurred to _______ it.
a. reform, counter
b. corruption, expand
c. depression, contract
d. recession, harness
e. expansion, control

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 643

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         NAT:  Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Political History | Corruption and Reform: Hayes to Harrison

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. The faction of the Republican party during the Gilded Age that was not concerned with the excesses of the time was known as the
a. Whigs.
b. Tories.
c. Stalwarts.
d. Know-Nothings.
e. Half-Breeds.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 643

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         NAT:  Historical Period

TOP:   Political History | Hayes and Civil Service Reform            MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The section of the Republican party during the Gilded Age that was concerned with the excesses of the time were known as the
a. Whigs.
b. Tories.
c. Stalwarts.
d. Know-Nothings.
e. Half-Breeds.

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 643

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         NAT:  Historical Period

TOP:   Political History | Hayes and Civil Service Reform            MSC:  Applying

 

  1. During his administration, this president tried to control both sides of his fractured party while pursing reform during the Gilded Age.
a. Hayes
b. Harrison
c. Grant
d. Cleveland
e. Roosevelt

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 643

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         NAT:  Historical Period

TOP:   Political History | Hayes and Civil Service Reform            MSC:  Applying

 

  1. One of the biggest political issues of the late 19th century was
a. monetary issues.
b. tariff issues.
c. pension issues for Civil War veterans.
d. civil rights issues.
e. immigration issues.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 644

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         NAT:  Historical Period

TOP:   Political History | Hayes and Civil Service Reform            MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Perhaps one of the greatest catalysts to reform during the Gilded Age was the assassination of
a. J. P. Morgan.
b. President Grant.
c. J. D. Salinger.
d. President Garfield.
e. President Roosevelt.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 645

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         NAT:  Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Political History | A Presidency Cut Short                         MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. This replaced the spoils system for federal jobs with job placement on the basis of competitive testing.
a. Sherman Anti-Trust Act
b. Barnes-Hailey Act
c. Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act
d. Garfield Memorial Reform Act
e. Civil Service Commission Testing and Placement Act

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 646

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         NAT:  Events and Processes

TOP:   Political History | The Civil Service Commission               MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Because of President Arthur’s reform programs
a. he was elected to another term.
b. he lost his attempt to win a second term.
c. he was not chosen by the Republicans as their candidate for a second term.
d. he was not chosen by the Democrats as their candidate for a second term.
e. he was the first president to win a third term.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 646

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         NAT:  Change and Continuity

TOP:   Political History | The Campaign of 1884                          MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The presidential election of 1884 could be described as
a. style over substance.
b. scandals over issues.
c. party issues over candidates.
d. domestic issues over foreign issues.
e. monetary issues over trade issues.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 647

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         NAT:  Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Political History | Blunders by the Blaine Campaign          MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. One of the first major areas of reform during the Gilded Age was toward
a. the railroads.
b. the political rings.
c. the steel manufacturers.
d. the oil refiners.
e. the textile industry.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 648

OBJ:   5. Evaluate the effectiveness of politicians in developing responses to the major economic and social problems of the Gilded Age.         NAT:  Historical Period

TOP:   Political History | Regulation of Railroad Rates                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Which of the following would favor the policy of sound money?
a. Farmer
b. Shipper
c. Land developer
d. Banker
e. Rancher

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 650

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. NAT:  Events and Processes

TOP:   Political History | Inadequate Currency and Unhappy Farmers

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Why did many people want a monetary supply not tied to gold or silver?
a. It would make it harder to get loans.
b. It would create a stronger economy.
c. It would make the dollar stronger.
d. It would make prices higher on goods.
e. It would make it harder to repay debts.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 650

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. NAT:  Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Political History | Inadequate Currency and Unhappy Farmers

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Which political party during the Gilded Age promoted the plight of miners and farmers?
a. Progressives
b. Mugwumps
c. Democrats
d. Republicans
e. Populists

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 650

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. NAT:  Historical Period

TOP:   Political History | Inadequate Currency and Unhappy Farmers

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. What did not play a role in the terrible economic conditions in the South during the late 19th century?
a. Newly cultivated fields in the west
b. International competition
c. Overproduction in the South
d. Inadequate monetary supply
e. Lack of labor

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 651

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. NAT:  Events and Processes

TOP:   Political History | A Vicious Cycle of Depressed Prices and Debt

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. The decision to only allow gold to be coined for money was derisively called the
a. Corrupt Bargain.
b. New Deal.
c. Crime of ’73.
d. Sherman Anti-Silver Act.
e. New Prosperity.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   p. 652

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. NAT:  Events and Processes

TOP:   Economic Development | Silver and Inflation                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The National Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry promoted the use of ________ to help farmers.
a. tenant farming
b. cooperatives
c. machinery
d. banks
e. savings and loans

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 653

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. NAT:  Change and Continuity

TOP:   Economic Development | The Granger Movement             MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Unlike the Grange, the ____________ promoted political involvement among its members to enact change for their members.
a. Farmers’ Alliances
b. Knights of Labor
c. Working Man’s party
d. American Federation of Labor
e. Congress of International Workers

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 653

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. NAT:  Historical Period

TOP:   Economic Development | Farmers’ Alliances                     MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The Panic of 1893 started when
a. the Sherman Silver Purchase Act pumped $4.5 million of silver into the market each month.
b. the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad declared bankruptcy.
c. the Texas cotton market collapsed because of drought.
d. the cattle market collapsed because of the blizzard of 1892.
e. the Populist Party was elected to Congress and their representatives passed unfavorable laws.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 655

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. NAT:  Historical Period

TOP:   Economic Development | The Depression of 1893 and the “Free Silver” Crusade

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. President Cleveland made the Panic of 1893 worse by
a. buying more silver and putting it into the market.
b. convincing Congress to switch back to only minting gold.
c. abolishing the spoils system.
d. refusing to honor their debt with England.
e. allowing the government to default on their deficit.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Moderate        REF:   p. 655

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. NAT:  Historical Interpretations

TOP:   Economic Development | The Depression of 1893 and the “Free Silver” Crusade

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. President Cleveland’s decision to support the gold standard
a. fractured the Democrat party into pro-gold, pro-silver wings.
b. won him a second term.
c. made the Democrats the dominant political party for the next twenty years.
d. destroyed his chance for a second term.
e. saved the United States from suffering through an economic depression.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   p. 657

OBJ:   6. Analyze why the money supply became a major political issue during the Gilded Age and describe its impact on American politics. NAT:  Change and Continuity

TOP:   Political History | The Election of 1896                             MSC:  Evaluating

 

ESSAY

 

  1. How did immigration to America change in the latter half of the 19th century, and what was the response to that change?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Compare social Darwinism and reform Darwinism. What were the basic assumptions of each movement?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Describe the explosive growth of urbanization in the late 19th century. What factors led to this growth, and where did the largest growth take place?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Discuss the impact that rapid growth had on the environment.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Trace the rise of popular culture in America. Focus on the new patterns of recreation and leisure. Who led this movement, and what activities were available to Americans?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Describe how living in an urban environment affected women’s lives.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Discuss the most serious public health challenges the urban population faced, how those challenges were addressed, and how effective the solutions were.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

PTS:   1

 

MATCHING

 

Match each person with one of the following descriptions.

a. Was the chief spokesperson for reform Darwinism
b. Wrote On the Origin of Species
c. Wrote Folkways
d. Vetoed the Bland-Allison Act before it was overridden by Congress
e. Was the Populist presidential candidate in 1892
f. Founded the Grange
g. Elected to two nonconsecutive terms as president
h. One of the charismatic leaders of the farm protest movement
i. Was McKinley’s campaign manager
j. Was the Democratic presidential candidate in 1896
k. Was Garfield’s vice president
l. Republican leader of the “Half-Breeds”

 

 

  1. Chester A. Arthur

 

  1. William Jennings Bryan

 

  1. Grover Cleveland

 

  1. Rutherford B. Hayes

 

  1. Mark Hanna

 

  1. James G. Blaine

 

  1. Oliver H. Kelley

 

  1. William Graham Sumner

 

  1. Charles Darwin

 

  1. Lester Frank Ward

 

  1. Mary Elizabeth Lease

 

  1. James B. Weaver

 

  1. ANS:  K                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  J                     PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  G                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  D                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  I                     PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  L                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  F                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  C                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  B                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  A                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  H                    PTS:   1

 

  1. ANS:  E                    PTS:   1

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