Systems Analysis and Design 6th Edition by Alan Dennis – Test Bank

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Sample Questions Posted Below

 

 

 

 

 

Multiple Choice:

  1. A process model is:
  2. The output of the interviewing process
  3. The work plan
  4. The model that is produced by extreme prototyping
  5. The expanded and thoroughly balanced use case for a system
  6. A formal way of representing how a business system operates

Ans: e

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty: easy

 

  1. A process model can __________:
  2. Only document the as-is system
  3. Only document the to-be system
  4. Document both the as-is and the to-be system
  5. Only be used in BPR situations
  6. Only be used with JAD sessions

 

Ans: c

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty: easy.

 

  1. Data flow diagramming is:
  2. The only process modeling currently used
  3. A detailed description of data
  4. Almost the same as a flow chart
  5. Focused on the processes or activities that are performed
  6. A visual version of a use case

 

Ans:  d

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty: easy

 

  1. Logical process models are:
  2. Models that describe processes without suggesting how they are conducted
  3. Coded logic models
  4. Models based upon implementing the if-then-else programming structure
  5. Developed by the infrastructure analyst
  6. Created in the system walkthough

Ans: a
response: see Introduction

Difficulty: easy

 

  1. Processes in data flow diagramming are represented by:
  2. Rounded boxes
  3. Arrows
  4. Rectangles that is open on the right end
  5. Enclosed rectangles
  6. Circles

Ans: a

Response:  see Elements of Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty: easy

 

 

 

 

  1. The relation between use cases and data flow diagrams is generally:
  2. Use cases are developed by users and data flow diagrams are developed by systems analysts
  3. Data flow diagrams are developed first and then use cases ensue
  4. Use cases are developed first and then data flow diagrams ensue
  5. Use cases show logical processes, while data flow diagrams show physical processes
  6. There is not a relationship between use cases and data flow diagrams

 

Ans:  c

Response:  see Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

  1. A data flow is:
  2. An activity or a function that is performed for some specific business reason
  3. A single piece of data
  4. A collection of entities
  5. A trigger to a use case
  6. A person, organization or system outside of the system

Ans: b

Response:  See Elements of Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty: easy

 

 

  1. An external entity is:
  2. An activity or a function that is performed for some specific business reason
  3. A single piece of data
  4. A collection of data
  5. A trigger to a use case
  6. A person, organization or system outside of the system

Ans: e

Response:  See Elements of Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty: easy

 

  1. Brianna has a process has two inputs but only one output.
  2. This is an error as there needs to be the same amount of inputs as outputs
  3. This is an error as process do not have inputs or outputs
  4. This is normal as all processes have two inputs and one output
  5. This is normal as all processes need at least one input and at least one output
  6. This is an error as processes only produce output

Ans: d

Response:  see

Difficulty: hard

 

  1. The relationship between use cases and data flow diagrams is:
  2. Use cases tend to be developed with users to make sure the analyst has fully captured the processes and relationships; DFD’s are built upon the use cases to more fully formally understand the processes involved
  3. Both are tools in a systems analysts toolbox, although they do unrelated things
  4. Use cases are developed by users exclusively; while DFD’s are developed by analysts exclusively
  5. Use cases come out of JAD sessions and clarify what was discussed by users in those sessions; DFD’s come out of analysts interviews.
  6. They are the same thing – use cases are process models using the DeMarco and Yourdon notation; and DFD’s are process models using the Gane and Sarson notation.

Ans: a

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty:  medium

 

 

  1. Andrea is creating a diagram model for processes (without regard to whether it is computerized or a manual process). She is probably creating _______________.
  2. A physical process model
  3. A PMT (process management tool) model
  4. A logical process model
  5. A user process model
  6. A UML system case model

Ans: c

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. Ruth is an analyst. On her DFD diagram she has just placed a process.  She will
  2. Give it a verb phrase name, like ‘search inventory’
  3. Give it a noun description phrase, like ‘Inventory-process-1’
  4. Give it only a number – and depending on whether it is a major process (a whole number) or a subsidiary process (a whole number with a decimal point and value – like 1.3)
  5. Give it a sentence name, like ‘Customer arrives at checkout counter’
  6. Use whatever process she feels comfortable with – as long as she is consistent

Ans: a

Response:  see Elements of Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  hard

 

  1. Which Data Flow Diagram shows the entire system with its environment with only one process?
  2. Context Diagram
  3. Level 0 diagrams
  4. Level 1 diagrams
  5. Level 2 diagrams
  6. All DFDs show this

Ans: a

Response:  see Context Diagram

Difficulty: easy

 

 

  1. Which Data Flow Diagram does not have data stores?
  2. Context diagram
  3. Level 0 diagram
  4. Level 1 diagrams
  5. Level 2 diagrams
  6. Process Diagram

Ans: a

Response:  see context diagram

Difficulty: easy

 

 

  1. On your level 0 diagram you have a process #2 and when you create a level 1 diagram for process #2, you might have processes like:
  2. 1, 2.2, 2.3
  3. 2-1, 2-2, 2-3
  4. 2A, 2B, 2C
  5. 2-A, 2-B, 2-C
  6. 2-initial, 2-main, 2-end

Ans: a

Response:  see Level 1 diagrams

Difficulty: medium

 

 

  1. A payroll data flow diagram has a data-store called Accumulated Salary Data. At one stage in the DFD, a process “Calculate YTD-Taxes” gets data from that data store, updates it in the process, and writes it back out.  The diagram should show:
  2. A single line with arrows on both ends labeled YTD Payroll Details
  3. A dashed line with arrows on both ends labeled YTD Payroll Details
  4. A line out of the data store labeled: Current YTD Payroll Details; and a line into the data store labeled: Updated YTD Payroll Details
  5. Two separate data flow lines but each with the same name YTD Payroll Details
  6. Two dashed lines but each with the same name of YTD Payroll Details

Ans: c

Response:  see Data Stores

Difficulty: hard

 

  1. James is developing a DFD. What would be a good name for him to use on a data flow from the Calculate Federal Withholding process to a data store called YTD Payroll Data?
  2. Move withholding to YTD storage
  3. Transfer fed taxes to YTD storage
  4. Calculation Result
  5. Federal Withholding Taxes
  6. Add amounts to YTD total

Ans: d

Response:  see Data Flow

Difficulty: hard

 

  1. Mark has a data store called ‘Items’ and it includes all the items sold in a convenience store – sorted by UPC code with the retail price of the item. He has only one data flow called ‘Item Details’ that flows from the data store to the Process Checkout process.  What will be true in this case?
  2. This is incorrect as every data store must have both inputs and outputs
  3. This is incorrect as every process must have both inputs and outputs
  4. This is incorrect as the data flow should have a verb phrase like ‘Get Item Details’
  5. This is incorrect as there is no way to update the ‘Items’ data store
  6. This is correct

Ans: e

Response:  see Data Flow

Difficulty: hard

 

 

  1. Vanessa has a data flow diagram with an item called ‘Register for Class’. That item would be:
  2. A process
  3. A data flow
  4. A data store
  5. An external entity
  6. A process relationship

Ans: a

Response:  see Process

Difficulty: medium

 

 

  1. Andrei has a diagram that shows only one process and external entities. He is developing a:
  2. Context diagram
  3. Use case diagram
  4. Level 0 diagram
  5. Level 1 diagram
  6. Level 2 diagram

Ans: a

Response:  see Context diagram

Difficulty: medium

 

 

  1. What diagram will have processes with one decimal place (like 3.1, 3.2, and 3.3) and might have flows coming in (or going out) that are not illustrated?
  2. Context diagram
  3. Level 0 diagram
  4. Level 1 diagram
  5. UML state diagram
  6. Level 0 diagram

Ans: c

Response:  see Level 1 diagram

Difficulty: medium

 

  1. What diagram will have sub-processes with numbers like 3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.3.3 (etc.) and also have flows coming in (or going out) that are not illustrated?
  2. Context diagram
  3. Level 0 diagram
  4. Gantt diagram
  5. Level 1 diagram
  6. Level 2 diagram

Ans: e

Response:  see Level 2 diagram

Difficulty: easy

 

 

  1. The context diagram shows:
  2. Detailed processing logic
  3. All major processes
  4. All the data stores in the system
  5. The “big picture” of the system with external entities and only one process
  6. The system in context with all other systems in that department (for example, accounts payable, accounts receivable, etc.)

Ans: d

Response:  see Context diagram

Difficulty: medium

 

  1. A process is:
  2. An activity of a function that is performed for some specific business reason
  3. A single piece of data within a system
  4. A collection of data within a system
  5. A person, organization or system that is external to the system
  6. A combination of function and the data it acts upon

Ans: a

Response:  see Process

Difficulty: easy

 

  1. A data flow is:
  2. An activity of a function that is performed for some specific business reason
  3. A single piece of data within a system
  4. A collection of data within a system
  5. A person, organization or system that is external to the system
  6. A combination of function and the data it acts upon

Ans: b

Response:  see Data Flow

Difficulty: easy

 

 

  1. Carlos has a Level 0 DFD diagram where one of the external entities is the “Internal Revenue Service” – and he has a data store called “Tax Rate Table”. He has drawn a data flow arrow from the Internal Revenue Service to the data store as the data has been loaded into the Tax Rate Table prior to the processing.  What would be true?
  2. This is correct
  3. This is incorrect, ‘data at rest stays at rest until moved by a process’ so he needs a process (like ‘load Tax Rate Table’) first in this system
  4. This is incorrect – he doesn’t need a data flow as the data was loaded into the Tax Rate Table someplace else (within the payroll system someplace, but not in this process)
  5. This is almost correct. The correct diagram would be a dashed line indicating that the loading of the data was implied prior to the start of this process
  6. This is incorrect. What should happen is an ‘external process’ should be called at the start of the process – like “Call IRS for data load”

Ans: c

Response:   see Validating the Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  medium

 

 

  1. Amy has created a context diagram. What one DFD component is probably not shown?
  2. Process
  3. Data flow
  4. UML Stage
  5. Data store
  6. External Entity

Ans: d

Response:  see Context diagram

Difficulty: easy

 

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT correct?
  2. Every set of DFD’s must have one context diagram
  3. Every process is wholly and completely described by the processes on its children DFD’s
  4. Every process must be broken down farther on Level 1 and Level 2 diagrams
  5. Every data store has at least one input data flow someplace in the entire DFD system
  6. Every process has a unique name that is an action oriented verb phrase

Ans: c

Response:  see Data Flow

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. Decomposing a DFD means:
  2. Balancing the processes so that each process has three and only three sub-processes
  3. Breaking complex processes into a structured set of detailed diagrams
  4. Doing a walk through on the entire DFD structure with all the analysts on the project team
  5. Taking lower levels of process refinement and aggregating them into a major system
  6. Making sure that all data stores are shown on each child DFD diagram

Ans: b

Response:  see Creating a Data Flow Diagram

Difficulty: medium

 

  1. Chunxia is balancing her DFD. This means she is:
  2. Making sure that all information presented at one level is accurately represented in the next level
  3. Making sure that each data store has at least one input data flow and at least one output data flow
  4. Making sure that each process has at least one input data flow and at least one output data flow
  5. Making sure that all processes start with action verb phrases
  6. Making sure that all data flows have noun names

Ans: a

Response:  see Balancing

Difficulty: medium

 

  1. Data flow diagrams are:
  2. Usually created by users and reviewed by analysts
  3. Usually jointly created by analysts and users
  4. Usually created by the project team and reviewed by users for correctness
  5. Usually created by the project champion and reviewed by the project team
  6. Usually created by business analyst and reviewed by the infrastructure analyst

Ans: c

Response:  see Validating the Data Flow Diagram

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. Which would be the normal order of tasks?
  2. Requirements gathering, creating DFDs, creating use cases
  3. Creating use cases; creating DFD, holding JAD sessions
  4. Interviewing and/or JAD sessions; creating use cases; creating data flow diagrams
  5. Doing BPR, analyzing documents, creating DFDs, creating use cases
  6. Doing activity elimination, doing use cases, doing DFDs

Ans: c

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. Tom is trying to change his Use Case into a Data Flow Diagram. He has found that a use case step generally is the same as a ________ on the Level 1 Data flow diagram.
  2. Process
  3. External Entity
  4. Data flow
  5. Internal Entity
  6. Data store

Ans: a

Response:  see Creating the Data Flow Diagram

Difficulty: medium

 

 

  1. Which of the following would be a ‘black hole’ error on a DFD?
  2. A process has no input
  3. A process has no output
  4. A process has four inputs and only three outputs
  5. Data moves directly from a data store from an external entity
  6. Two processes send data flows to the same data store

Ans:  b

Response:  see Validating the Data Flow Diagram

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. Ramesh has drawn a set of DFD’s that are not properly balanced. This is probably a:
  2. Syntax error
  3. Semantic error
  4. Modeling error
  5. First law of conservation of data error
  6. Second law of conservation of data error

Ans: a

Response:  see Balancing the Data Flow Diagram

Difficulty:  medium

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRUE / FALSE

 

  1. The normal order of processes would be: requirements gathering, use case development, process modeling (data flow diagrams).

Ans: True

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty: easy

 

  1. A process model is an informal way of showing the external entities, event triggers, inputs and outputs.

Ans: False

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty: medium

 

 

  1. Process models are only used to document the current system (that is, the “as-is” system), since that is the system the users know and is the system that will be modified.

Ans: False

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. Process models can be used with either ‘as-is’ systems or ‘to-be’ systems.

Ans: True

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. Data Flow diagramming is a tool for doing process modeling.

Ans: True

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty:  easy

 

  1. Data flow diagrams (as the name implies) focus on the physical data in a system.

Ans: False

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty:  medium

 

 

  1. According to the authors “Process modeling – and the creating of PMPs in particular – is one of the most important skills needed by systems analysts”.

Ans: False

Response:  see Introduction

Difficulty:  medium

 

 

 

  1. Processes in DFDs are shown as circles in the Gane and Sarson notation.

Ans: False

Response:  see Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

  1. Data that is moving from a process to another process is called a ‘data stream’.

Ans: False

Response:  see Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

 

  1. A repository for data in DFDs is called a ‘data store’

Ans: True

Response:  see Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  medium

 

 

  1. Data (like Year-to-date totals) that come from a data store and are used in a process (like ‘Calculate YTD Totals’) and then the updated amounts are written back to the data store – can be drawn on a DFD model as a two-headed arrow.

Ans:  False

Response:  see Elements of Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. A well-constructed use case makes developing a data flow diagram fairly straightforward.

Ans: True

Response:  see Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

  1. The data stores on the DFD correspond to Major Steps Performed on a use case.

Ans: False

Response:  see Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. Every process on a DFD must have at least one input data flow.

Ans: True

Response:  see Elements of Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

 

  1. Every process has a unique identification number, a name and a description.

Ans: True

Response:  see Elements of Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

  1. Processes should be named with a verb and ending with a noun (like Calculate Sales Tax).

Ans: True

Response:  see Elements of Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

  1. Data flows are named with verb phrases (like ‘Move Payroll Information to Payroll Database’).

Ans:  False

Response:  see Elements of Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

 

  1. Data stores are named with nouns and have an identification number and description.

 

Ans:  True

Response:  see Elements of Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

  1. External entities are a person, organization, or system that is external to the system, but interacts with it.

 

Ans:  True

Response:  see Elements of Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

  1. Many business processes are too complex to be explained in one DFD.

 

Ans:  True

Response:  see Using Data Flow Diagrams to Define Business Processes

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. One important principal in process modeling with DFD’s is the decomposition on the business processes into a series of DFD’s.

 

Ans:  True

Response:  see Using Data Flow Diagrams to Define Business Processes

Difficulty: medium

 

 

  1. Context diagrams show the entire system in context with the environment (like external entities).

 

Ans:  True

Response:  see Context diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

  1. The level 0 diagram shows all the major processes (at the first level of numbering – like 1 through 4), the data stores, data flows, but does not show external entities.

 

Ans:  False

Response:  see Level 0 Diagram

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. The purpose of the Level 0 DFD is to show all the major high-level processes of the system and how they are interrelated.

 

Ans:  True

Response:  see Level 0 Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

  1. In general, all process models will have as many level 1 diagrams as there are processes on the level 0 diagram.

 

Ans:  True

Response:  see Level 1 Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

  1. Children processes collectively make up the parent process (but give more detail).

 

Ans:  True

Response:  see Level 1 Diagrams

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. It is possible to decompose level 1 processes even farther, so for example, process 2.1 on a Level 1 DFD might become 2.1A, 2.1B, 2.1C, etc.

 

Ans:  False

Response:  see Level 2 Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

  1. The second law of conservation of data states: “Processes cannot consume or create data”.

 

Ans:  True

Response:  see Validating the Data Flow Diagram

Difficulty:  easy

 

  1. A ‘black hole’ error on a DFD is when a process creates output without an input.

 

Ans:  False

Response:  see Validating the Data Flow Diagram

Difficulty:  medium

 

 

  1. Data cannot go from one process to another process without going to a data store first

 

Ans: False

Response:  see Building Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

  1. Project teams usually use process modeling tools or CASE tools to draw process models.

 

Ans: True

Response:  see Creating Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

  1. Structured English uses complete sentences to describe the work that a process performs in a system.

 

Ans: False

Response:  see Process Descriptions

Difficulty:  easy

 

  1. Data cannot go from one process to another process without going to a data store first

 

Ans: False

Response:  see Building Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

  1. While there is no one right way to begin, the authors have found it useful to first build the context diagram showing all the external entities to the system.

 

Ans: True

Response:  see Creating Data Flow Diagrams

Difficulty:  easy

 

  1. Iterations are not used in good DFD design.

 

Ans: False

Response:  see Creating the Level 0 Data Flow Diagram

Difficulty:  easy

 

 

Essays:

 

  1. What is the relationship between context diagrams and level 0 diagrams.

Ans:  Context diagrams show only one process and level 0 diagrams show all processes in the system.  Level 0 diagrams also show the data stores.  Level 0 diagrams detail the processes that make up the “system” that is represented on the Context Diagram.

Difficulty:  easy

 

  1. What is the relationship between level 0 and level 1 DFD diagrams?

Ans:  Level 0 DFD’s show all the processes (and external entities), while Level 1 DFD’s show sub-processes and may not show external entities (for small systems).  For example, Process 4 from the Level 0 DFD might be broken into sub-processes 4.1; 4.2; 4.3; 4.4 (etc.)

 

 

  1. What are the four symbols used in data flow diagrams?

Ans:  process – a rounded circle – starts with a verb and ends with a noun.  Describes some process that must occur

Data flow – arrows with a head showing direction – indicating the movement of data

Data stores – a rectangle that is open on the right side – indicating stored data such as a data repository (database)

External entity – a rectangle – indicates a person, organization, or other system that is outside of the modeled system, but interacts with the modeled system

Difficulty:  medium

 

  1. Create a context diagram for the following: Insurance-R-Us is an online car insurance company.  Potential customers must go to: http://insurance-r-us.com and enter information into a form.  From the information given, an insurance rate quote is generated and returned to the potential customer.

 

Ans: above

Difficulty:  hard

Response: see Using Data Flow Diagrams to Define Business Processes

 

 

  1. Create a level 0 diagram for the following: Insurance-R-Us is an online car insurance company.  The main processes are:  Get Customer Information; Calculate Risk; Calculate Rate Quote.

 

 

Ans:  Using Data Flow Diagrams to Define Business Processes

Difficulty: hard

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