Phychological Science 5th Edition by Michael Gazzaniga – Test Bank

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CHAPTER 05: Sensation and Perception

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Taj wants to create a robot that has sensation but not perception. The robot should:
A. react to light but not to the stimuli for taste, smell, or touch.
B. detect external energy sources but not interpret them.
C. understand what things are but be unable to respond to them.
D. construct useful information but be unable to remember it.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. Anna is reading her psychology text. The activation of receptors in her retina is called ________; her interpretation of the stimuli as particular words is termed ________.
A. sensation; sensation as well C. perception; sensation
B. sensation; perception D. perception; perception as well

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. ________ is the body’s detection of external or internal sensory stimuli, whereas ________ is its further processing, organizing, and interpreting of those stimuli.
A. Sensation; perception C. Transduction; perception
B. Perception; sensation D. Perception; transduction

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Amadi is listening to John play the guitar. When John plays a note, the vibrations of the air are picked up by auditory receptors in his ear and sent to his brain. In Amadi’s brain, the information from the receptors is analyzed to produce the experience of a musical note. The pickup of information by receptors in the ear is ________; the processing to produce the experience of a musical note is ________.
A. sensation; perception
B. bottom-up processing; sensation
C. perception; sensation
D. top-down processing; bottom-up processing

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Our perception of the world is most like a:
A. digital camera that takes snapshots.
B. cell phone camera that takes movies without sound.
C. video camera that takes movies with sound.
D. film that has been edited to convey a theme.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. The physical properties of a stimulus are translated into neural impulses in a process called:
A. perception. C. sensation.
B. transduction. D. coarse coding.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.1 Sensory Information Is Translated into Meaningful Signals

OBJ:   5.1B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. After transduction, most of the sensory neural information passes through which structure?
A. hypothalamus C. thalamus
B. hippocampus D. amygdala

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.1 Sensory Information Is Translated into Meaningful Signals

OBJ:   5.1B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Because the brain cannot process physical stimuli directly, it must convert the stimuli into chemical and electrical signals that can be interpreted by the brain. This process is known as:
A. coarse coding. C. transduction.
B. perceptual constancy. D. sensory adaptation.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.1 Sensory Information Is Translated into Meaningful Signals

OBJ:   5.1B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. During transduction, most sensory information is transmitted first to the ________ before it is sent to the ________, where it is interpreted as sight, sound, touch, or taste.
A. thalamus; cortex C. thalamus; amygdala
B. cortex; thalamus D. amygdala; cortex

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.1 Sensory Information Is Translated into Meaningful Signals

OBJ:   5.1B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Hannah is having dinner at a Mexican restaurant. When she tries the three kinds of sauces to see how hot they are, she is assessing ________ differences. When she compares the taste of her margarita to the taste of her friend’s Mexican beer, she is assessing a ________ difference.
A. qualitative; qualitative C. quantitative; quantitative
B. qualitative; quantitative D. quantitative; qualitative

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.1 Sensory Information Is Translated into Meaningful Signals

OBJ:   5.1B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Which subfield of psychology studies the relationship between physical stimuli and the psychological experiences they produce?
A. psychophysiology C. behavioral neuroscience
B. behavioral genetics D. psychophysics

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 5, Professional Development

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Research in this area has shown that earlier research in psychophysics ignored the key variable of human judgment.
A. Weber’s law C. psychophysiology
B. psychoacoustics D. signal detection theory

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. A psychophysicist would be most directly concerned with:
A. our psychological reactions to physical stress.
B. the effects of genetics on the endocrine system.
C. the effect of neurotransmitters on depression.
D. the relation between the wavelength of light and the experience of color.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 5, Professional Development

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Dr. Breiland examines the relationship between the physical properties of light, such as its amplitude and wavelength, and humans’ perception of color. Which of the following terms most accurately describes Dr. Breiland’s field of study?
A. sensation C. perceptual constancy
B. psychophysics D. cognitive psychology

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 5, Professional Development

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. A(n) ________ is the minimum intensity of sensory stimulation required before the sensation is detected 50 percent of the time.
A. absolute threshold C. difference threshold
B. minimum threshold D. sensory adaptation

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Jason is doing a psychology experiment in which he is seated in an absolutely dark room. An initially undetected point of light in front of him is gradually made more intense. With each increase, he is asked if he can see the light yet. In this experiment, Jason’s ________ is being measured.
A. difference threshold C. just noticeable difference
B. absolute threshold D. psychophysical limit

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The minimum amount of change required for a person to detect a difference between two stimuli is referred to as the:
A. absolute threshold. C. difference threshold.
B. minimum threshold. D. signal change.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Prashanth is participating in a psychology experiment in which he is asked to gradually shrink the image of a square on his computer screen until he can see that it is smaller than a second square on the screen. Prashanth is trying to create a ________ in order to allow measurement of a ________.
A. just noticeable difference; absolute threshold
B. psychophysical difference; absolute threshold
C. just noticeable difference; difference threshold
D. psychophysical difference; difference threshold

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The law that states that the just noticeable difference between two stimuli is based on a proportion of the original stimulus is:
A. Fechner’s law. C. Koehler’s law.
B. Weber’s law. D. Wernicke’s law.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. ________ states that the more intense the original stimulus, the greater the change in intensity required to produce a just noticeable difference.
A. Matching law C. Signal detection theory
B. Weber’s law D. Sensory adaptation

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. For which of the following pairs would it be easiest to discern a difference in weight?
A. a 2-liter bottle of water and a 2.1-liter bottle of water
B. a 5-pound free weight and a 5.5-pound free weight
C. a 20-pound child and a 22-pound child
D. a 1-pound bag of sugar and a 2-pound bag of sugar

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. In research on signal detection theory, incorrectly “detecting” a stimulus that was not presented in a trial is called a:
A. correct rejection. C. response bias.
B. false alarm. D. transduction.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. On Monday, Manuel interviewed for a job that he really wants. The interviewer told Manuel that he would call on Friday to tell Manuel if he got the job. On late Friday afternoon, Manuel is in the shower, straining to hear the phone above the noise of the water. Whenever he hears a sound, he thinks it is the phone. Manuel is showing ________ , a concept described in ________.
A. response bias; opponent-process theory
B. sensory adaptation; opponent-process theory
C. response bias; signal detection theory
D. sensory adaptation; signal detection theory

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. In classical psychophysics, the concept of an absolute threshold rests on the assumption that a subject’s response is:
A. an accurate reflection of the subject’s perception.
B. influenced by both perception and judgment.
C. not a good index of actual perception.
D. a good index of perception but not of sensation.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Remembering

 

  1. When Petra jumps into a cold lake, she feels as though she is freezing. After a few minutes, she no longer notices the cold and feels comfortable in the water. This change is an example of:
A. convergence. C. sensory adaptation.
B. just noticeable difference. D. sensory threshold.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. People stop responding to unchanging stimuli because:
A. unchanging stimuli convey little new information.
B. such stimuli can no longer be detected.
C. the stimuli exceed people’s attentional capacity.
D. unchanging stimuli cannot be transduced.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.1 Detection Requires a Certain Amount of the Stimulus

OBJ:   5.1D

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Remembering

 

  1. Rachel was in an auto accident and now has a form of object agnosia. She has perfectly accurate 20/20 vision, but she cannot recognize the differences between animals when she sees them. For example, she cannot tell the difference between a giraffe and a zebra. Joel has a degenerative illness that has affected his retinae but is otherwise normal in all of his mental functioning. Which of the following statements is most accurate?
A. Rachel has impaired sensation, while Joel has impaired perception.
B. Rachel has impaired perception, while Joel has impaired sensation.
C. Rachel has an impaired absolute threshold, but Joel has an impaired difference threshold.
D. Rachel has an impaired difference threshold, but Joel has an impaired absolute threshold.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Alex is at a rock concert.  When his ears send a signal to his brain that he has heard a sound, this process is most accurately called ________.  But when he recognizes that the sound is his favorite song, this process is most accurately called ________.
A. sensation; perception C. perception; sensation
B. false alarm; hit D. hit; false alarm

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Transduction is an important step of ________ processing, while recognition of objects is an important element of ________ processing.
A. vision; audition
B. top-down processing; bottom-up processing
C. ventral stream; dorsal stream
D. sensory; perceptual

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Javier’s attention is captured by the loud sirens and bright lights of an ambulance as it passes by. Arezou’s attention is captured when she hears someone say her name. Javier’s response is best explained as a result of ________ , while Arezou’s response is best explained as a result of ________.
A. top-down processing; bottom-up processing
B. bottom-up processing; top-down processing
C. qualitative information; quantitative information
D. quantitative information; qualitative information

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Dolphins and bats are able to echolocate, meaning they can detect the locations of objects in their environment by certain waves of energy emitted or reflected by those objects.  Which of the following might dolphins and bats have that humans do not?
A. glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves
B. thalamic input from sensory receptors
C. sensory receptors for echolocation
D. the ability to navigate in water or air

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. All five of the familiar human sensory systems send information to the brain through the cranial nerves, but one sensory system sends information to the brain through the spinal nerves as well.  Which of our sensory systems can also send information to the brain through the spinal nerves?
A. vision C. taste
B. hearing D. touch

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. You are developing a new test to better detect toxins in the bloodstream. You want to create a test that can detect toxins every time they are present, but you do not want the test to come back positive if toxins are not actually present. If you succeed, your test will be superior to others because you have improved the:
A. response bias. C. absolute threshold.
B. difference threshold. D. stimulus signal.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. You are asked to participate in an experiment to see if people can detect very subtle emotional expressions on other people’s faces. However, sometimes the image the experimenter shows you is blurry, and it is hard to distinguish whether or not you see an emotional expression. You decide that you will respond by indicating you have detected an emotion in a person’s face, even when you are unsure. According to Signal Detection Theory, which of the following two outcomes are you most likely to have?
A. hits and misses C. hits and false alarms
B. misses and correct rejections D. false alarms and correct rejections

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Based on your knowledge of Signal Detection Theory, which of the following might be easiest for a participant in an experiment to change?
A. their absolute threshold C. their accuracy
B. their difference threshold D. their response bias

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.1 How Does Perception Emerge from Sensation?

OBJ:   5.1D

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Analyzing

 

  1. When Jodi walks from the sunlight into a dark theater, her ________ causes her ________ to enlarge.
A. iris; pupil C. cornea; lens
B. iris; lens D. cornea; pupil

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The ________ does most of the focusing of the light onto the retina, and the ________ allows for more accuracy of focusing.
A. cornea; pupil C. lens; cornea
B. pupil; lens D. cornea; lens

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Someone who needs reading glasses to see at a close distance has problems ________ her lens. Someone who needs glasses to see objects at a distance has problems ________ his lens.
A. thickening; flattening C. thickening; thickening
B. flattening; flattening D. flattening; thickening

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Zheng and Glenn are talking about ways that, when a man first meets a woman, he can tell if she likes him. Given your knowledge of sensory systems, you could suggest that the man look to see if the woman:
A. turns down the corners of her mouth. C. gives off a subtle odor.
B. has enlarged pupils. D. starts to speak more softly.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. Encharta is sitting outside, looking at her beautiful garden. As the sun goes down, the colors become less bright and finally all become shades of gray. This change happens because the:
A. amount of photopigment is decreasing.
B. amount of photopigment is increasing.
C. cones are taking over for the rods.
D. rods are taking over for the cones.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Colleen and LaVonne are playing darts. Colleen throws her dart into the center of the target, and LaVonne throws his dart into the outer ring. In an analogy to vision, Colleen would have been likely to hit a ________, and LaVonne would have been likely to hit a ________.
A. rod; cone C. cone; cone
B. rod; rod D. cone; rod

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Melody is looking up a phone number in a phone book with tiny print. She will most likely be able to read the number if she looks at the phone book with her ________ because it has the largest number of ________.
A. fovea; rods C. fovea; cones
B. periphery; rods D. periphery; cones

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The area where the optic nerve leaves the retina is referred to as the:
A. optic chiasm. C. fovea.
B. ganglion bundle. D. blind spot.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The optic nerve is composed of axons of:
A. rods and cones. C. ganglion cells.
B. bipolar cells. D. foveal cells.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The point at which the optic nerves meet and then split is termed the optic:
A. callosum. C. commissure.
B. chiasm. D. sulcus.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The optic nerve projects from the retina through a neural pathway that progresses to the ________ , which is located in the ________ lobe.
A. lateral geniculate nucleus; occipital C. primary visual cortex; parietal
B. lateral geniculate nucleus; parietal D. primary visual cortex; occipital

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The axons from ________ cells form the ________, which exits the eye at the back of the retina.
A. ganglion; optic nerve C. ganglion; optic chiasm
B. amacrine; optic nerve D. amacrine; optic chiasm

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Due to the partial crossing of visual information at the ________, the ________ visual field projects to the right hemisphere.
A. blind spot; left C. blind spot; right
B. optic chiasm; left D. optic chiasm; right

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Which of the following statements best describes the path of optic nerve impulses in the brain?
A. Impulses from the left eye travel to the right side of the brain; impulses from the right eye travel to the left side of the brain.
B. Impulses from the left eye travel to the left side of the brain; impulses from the right eye travel to the right side of the brain.
C. Impulses from the left half of each eye travel to the right side of the brain; impulses from the right half of each eye travel to the left side of the brain.
D. Impulses from the left half of each eye travel to the left side of the brain; impulses from the right half of each eye travel to the left side of the brain.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Yellow is considered one of the primary colors, but there is no cone specialized to respond to yellow light. When we see yellow, it is because the light is stimulating the:
A. S cones very little and the L and M cones equally.
B. S cones very little, the L cones greatly, and the M cones moderately.
C. S and M cones equally and the L cones very little.
D. S and L cones equally and the M cones greatly.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 The Color of Light Is Determined by Its Wavelength    OBJ:   5.2B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Red and green appear to be opposite colors because of the activity of ganglion cells that are:
A. excited by L cones and inhibited by M cones.
B. excited by M cones and inhibited by L cones.
C. excited by L cones and inhibited by S and M cones.
D. excited by S cones and inhibited by L and M cones.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 The Color of Light Is Determined by Its Wavelength    OBJ:   5.2B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. If you look at a square made up of alternating red and blue stripes for several minutes, then look immediately at a blank white sheet of paper, you will see a square with alternating green and yellow stripes. This effect results from pairs of ________ that work ________.
A. cones; in concert C. ganglion cells; in concert
B. cones; in opposition D. ganglion cells; in opposition

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 The Color of Light Is Determined by Its Wavelength    OBJ:   5.2B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. We cannot see a shade of bluish yellow because:
A. there is no set of cones responsive to combined shades.
B. there is no set of cones responsive to wavelengths associated with yellow.
C. ganglion cells that are excited by S cones are inhibited by M and L cones.
D. ganglion cells that are excited by L cones are inhibited by M cones.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.2 The Color of Light Is Determined by Its Wavelength    OBJ:   5.2B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. How do the light waves reflected by a blue object differ from those reflected by a red object?
A. The blue object reflects longer wavelength light.
B. The blue object reflects shorter wavelength light.
C. The blue object reflects higher amplitude light.
D. The blue object reflects lower amplitude light.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 The Color of Light Is Determined by Its Wavelength    OBJ:   5.2B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Susan is wearing a bright red skirt. She is trying to decide whether she wants to wear a pink top or a brown top with it. If she decides on the pink top, then the top and the skirt will vary in ________.

If she decides on the brown top, then the top and the skirt will vary in ________.

A. hue; saturation C. brightness; hue
B. hue; brightness D. saturation; hue

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 The Color of Light Is Determined by Its Wavelength    OBJ:   5.2B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. A gray square is placed first on a white sheet of paper and then on a black sheet of paper. The square will be ________ on the black as on the white background.
A. equally bright, but appear darker C. brighter and appear lighter
B. equally bright, but appear lighter D. less bright, but appear equally light

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.2 The Color of Light Is Determined by Its Wavelength    OBJ:   5.2B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Sameer is mixing paint. He starts with a very deep green paint and then gradually adds white paint. Sameer is ________ of the green paint.
A. changing the hue C. decreasing the saturation
B. increasing the saturation D. changing the simultaneous contrast

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 The Color of Light Is Determined by Its Wavelength    OBJ:   5.2B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. When Maggie comes home, she is surprised to see that her roommate has painted their living room red. The room looks so dazzlingly red because the paint has absorbed the ________ wavelengths of light and is reflecting the ________ wavelengths to Maggie’s eyes.
A. long; short and medium C. short and medium; long
B. long and short; medium D. long and medium; short

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 The Color of Light Is Determined by Its Wavelength    OBJ:   5.2B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Diane is experimenting with the lighting she will use at a rock concert. When she lights the stage blue, she is flooding it with ________ wavelengths of light. If she wants to change the stage to look red, she will need to shift the light to include ________ wavelengths. To change from red to green, she will need to move to ________ wavelengths.
A. long; medium; short C. medium; long; short
B. long; short; medium D. short; long; medium

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 The Color of Light Is Determined by Its Wavelength    OBJ:   5.2B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Approximately what proportion of the cerebral cortex has been estimated to be involved in vision in some way?
A. 10 percent C. 50 percent
B. 25 percent D. 75 percent

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The primary visual cortex is located in which brain lobe?
A. frontal C. occipital
B. temporal D. parietal

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. In visual processing, ventral is to dorsal as:
A. what is to where. C. superior is to inferior.
B. where is to what. D. both B and C.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. If the ventral stream of your visual cortex were not working temporarily, you would be unable to understand ________ an object is; but if your dorsal stream was still functioning, you could understand ________ an object is.
A. where; what C. where; why
B. what; where D. what; why

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Object agnosia provides support for the idea that there are two separate streams of analysis of visual information because it shows that:
A. both streams are necessary for perception.
B. damage to one stream produces partial dysfunction in the other.
C. damage to the ventral stream still allows spatial perception.
D. damage to the ventral stream still allows object perception.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Sensory Receptors in the Eye Transmit Visual Information to the Brain

OBJ:   5.2A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Prosopagnosia refers to a deficit in:
A. recognizing faces. C. recognizing objects.
B. naming objects. D. producing speech.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Students participating in a psychology experiment are asked to identify the emotions expressed by a number of different kinds of faces. On which type of face would they recognize the emotion most quickly?
A. happy man C. happy woman
B. angry man D. angry woman

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. With respect to facial recognition, which of the following statements is true?
A. Most people recognize anger more quickly on a man’s face than on a woman’s.
B. Most people recognize happiness more quickly on a man’s face than on a woman’s.
C. Neither A nor B is true.
D. Both A and B are true.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. After being in a car crash, Yuri has the selective inability to recognize faces. He is most likely suffering from ________ due to damage to his ________.
A. agnosia; primary visual cortex
B. agnosia; fusiform gyrus
C. prosopagnosia; primary visual cortex
D. prosopagnosia; fusiform gyrus

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Subjects participating in an MRI study are shown pictures of several kinds of faces. To which of these types of faces will the fusiform gyrus show the greatest activation?
A. any upright face C. a face gazing to the left
B. any upside-down face D. a face gazing to the right

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Damian frequently runs into Carmen while he is walking his dog. He is puzzled because Carmen always greets his dog but never greets him until he has spoken to her. He becomes even more perplexed when Carmen says, “Oh look, there is Ryan’s car,” even though Ryan is standing right next to the car. You could enlighten Damian by telling him that Carmen quite likely suffers from:
A. agnosia. C. prosopagnosia.
B. apraxia. D. aphasia.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Regarding visual illusions, which of the following statements is most accurate?
A. Illusions are largely irrelevant to understanding normal perceptual processes.
B. Illusions help reveal normal perceptual processes.
C. Most visual perception is actually illusory.
D. Illusions show that perception is mostly a bottom-up process.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.2 Object Constancies Help When Perspective Changes    OBJ:   5.2F

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. The first psychologists to emphasize the organizing processes underlying perception were the ________ psychologists.
A. structural C. Gestalt
B. psychodynamic D. cognitive

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. This principle states that rather than perceiving “a car” as a group of distinct entities, such as “metal, tires, glass, door handles, hubcaps, and fenders,” we perceive the car as a whole unit.
A. bottom-up processing C. Gestalt
B. bottom-down processing D. Ponzo illusion

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Consider the pattern: XXY XXY XXY. People perceive this pattern as consisting of three groups of three letters each. Which Gestalt principle accounts for this outcome?
A. similarity C. proximity
B. good continuation D. common region

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Consider the two following patterns: >>>>><<<<< and +++++*****. The ten characters in the first pattern are perceived as a single figure, whereas the ten characters in the second pattern are perceived as two groups of five characters each. Which Gestalt principle accounts for this outcome?
A. similarity C. proximity
B. symmetry D. closure

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. People see the figure ( ) as an oval rather than two separate curving lines. Which Gestalt principle accounts for this outcome?
A. similarity C. parallelism
B. good continuation D. closure

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. There is a loaf of bread behind a container of milk on the table in front of you. You see the bread as a single loaf rather than two half loaves, one on either side of the milk container. Which Gestalt principle accounts for this outcome?
A. similarity C. parallelism
B. good continuation D. closure

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. You are standing at the intersection of two perpendicular roads. You see one road running north-south and another road running east-west. You do not see one road running north and then turning east and another road running east then turning north. Which Gestalt principle accounts for what you do and do not see?
A. similarity C. parallelism
B. good continuation D. closure

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. According to this information processing model, the recognition of patterns occurs because the data are relayed from a lower level to a higher level of processing in the brain.
A. bottom-up processing C. top-up processing
B. bottom-down processing D. top-down processing

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. A scientist is studying how cells develop into organs. This process is similar to:
A. figure-ground segmentation. C. top-down processing.
B. Gestalt law of similarity. D. bottom-up processing.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. According to this information processing model, pattern recognition occurs because the data at higher levels of mental processing influence the lower levels in the processing hierarchy.
A. bottom-up processing C. top-up processing
B. bottom-down processing D. top-down processing

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. In this condition, people are unable to distinguish one face from another, but they can recognize other objects.
A. prosopagnosia C. monocular disparity
B. fusiform gyrus D. binocular disparity

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. A region of this area in the right hemisphere of the brain appears to be specialized for perceiving faces.
A. prosopagnosia C. amygdala
B. fusiform gyrus D. visual cortex

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Perceiving Objects Requires Organization of Visual Information

OBJ:   5.2D               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Scotty makes dinner by looking at his ingredients and then combining them into a meal. Nora makes dinner by deciding on the meal and then selecting the ingredients. Scotty is cooking in a ________ manner, and Nora is cooking in a ________ manner.
A. bottom-up; top-down C. top-down; top-down
B. top-down; bottom-up D. bottom-up; bottom-up

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. As part of an experiment, Amanda is seated in front of a blank computer screen. On each trial, a line appears on the screen and then an object appears above the line. The task is to name the object as rapidly as possible. The object is either presented alone or within a scene. For example, a chicken may be presented alone or in a barnyard. People are significantly faster at naming the object when it is presented in the scene. This result is evidence for:
A. bottom-up processing in visual perception.
B. top-down processing in visual perception.
C. the role of context in figure-ground segmentation.
D. a cognitive application of the Gestalt laws.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. The major problem to be explained in depth perception is that:
A. the environment contains too few depth cues.
B. there are no receptor cells that are selective for depth.
C. there are no cells in the primary visual cortex that are selective for depth.
D. the retina input is two-dimensional.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Remembering

 

  1. Which of the following terms is most nearly synonymous with the term disparity?
A. difference C. constancy
B. distance D. sensitivity

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. If you close one eye, you will still be able to use ________ as a depth cue, but you will not be able to use ________ as a depth cue.
A. linear perspective; occlusion C. convergence; motion parallax
B. texture gradients; disparity D. disparity; linear perspective

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Each eye sees more of the world on its own side of the visual field. A combination of the views from the two eyes provides humans with an adaptive advantage by creating a broader panorama of the scene. It also creates the depth cue of:
A. linear perspective. C. occlusion.
B. motion parallax. D. binocular disparity.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. If the muscles of one eye are paralyzed, making it impossible to change the point of focus of that eye, which kind of depth cue will become unavailable?
A. linear perspective C. occlusion
B. binocular disparity D. motion parallax

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. As Pippa threads a needle, her eyes rotate inward. She knows the needle is close enough to perform the task by virtue of the depth cue termed:
A. convergence. C. occlusion.
B. binocular disparity. D. parallax.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. When an artist creates the illusion of depth in a painting, she does so by using:
A. depth cues from stereoscopic vision.
B. binocular depth cues.
C. monocular depth cues.
D. depth cues from retinal disparity.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Leonardo da Vinci identified many monocular (pictorial) depth cues, including ________, in which a near object blocks an object that is farther away.
A. occlusion C. familiar size
B. relative size D. linear perspective

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Li-Ting is painting a picture. She paints a vase of flowers and then, right next to it, half of a book. When Bijal looks at the painting, she sees the book as being ________ because of ________.
A. adjacent to the vase; occlusion
B. adjacent to the vase; linear perspective
C. behind the vase; linear perspective
D. behind the vase; occlusion

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Ayelet is trying to draw a picture of two people on opposite sides of a river. No matter how carefully she tries to draw the two people the same size, the person who is supposed to be on the distant side seems to be much taller than the person who is supposed to be on the closer side. You could explain that the depth cue of ________ means that she will need to draw ________ of the person who is to be seen as farther away.
A. relative size; a smaller image C. familiar size; a larger image
B. relative size; a larger image D. familiar size; a smaller image

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. In this pictorial depth cue, objects below the horizon that appear higher in the visual field are perceived as being farther away, and objects above the horizon that appear lower in the visual field are perceived as being farther away.
A. occlusion C. familiar size
B. relative size D. position relative to horizon

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Daniel is standing on the outside platform of the train station. He is looking down the tracks hoping to see his train. As the tracks get farther from him the two sides of the tracks will appear to ________ , providing the depth cue of ________.
A. remain parallel; linear perspective C. remain parallel; texture gradient
B. converge; linear perspective D. converge; texture gradient

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. When you are on a small bluff, the ocean sand looks smooth and uniform, but when you sit down on the sand you can see all the bumps and colors. This difference is an example of which depth cue?
A. position relative to the horizon C. texture gradient
B. figure to ground D. motion parallax

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. When the moon is high in the sky it will appear ________ when it is close to the horizon.
A. larger than C. more distant than
B. just as distant as D. closer than

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. Aditi is looking out the passenger-side window of a moving car. She is staring intently at a scarecrow in the middle of a large cornfield. The rows of corn between Aditi and the scarecrow seem to be moving in the ________. The rows of corn beyond the scarecrow seem to be moving in the ________.
A. opposite direction from Aditi; same direction as Aditi
B. same direction as Aditi; opposite direction from Aditi
C. opposite direction from Aditi; opposite direction from Aditi
D. same direction as Aditi; same direction as Aditi

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. An Ames room is constructed so that the two back corners seem to be equidistant from the front of the room, when the right corner is actually much farther away. Someone first sits in the left corner and then sits in the right corner. To an observer in the front of the room, that person will seem ________ when he is sitting in the right corner.
A. farther away C. smaller
B. closer D. bigger

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.2 Size Perception Depends on Distance

OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Remembering

 

  1. The illusion of the Ames room works because:
A. size is computed from an incorrect estimate of distance.
B. distance is inferred from an incorrect assumption about size.
C. conflicting occlusion cues make a depth determination ambiguous.
D. the conflict between texture gradient and convergence cues is incorrectly resolved.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.2 Size Perception Depends on Distance

OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. The size of an object’s retinal image is ________ correlated with ________.
A. negatively; the amount of attention we pay to it
B. negatively; its distance
C. positively; the amount of attention we pay to it
D. positively; its distance

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.2 Size Perception Depends on Distance

OBJ:   5.2E               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. In the Ponzo illusion, cues to size and to distance conflict. The fact that an illusion of size is created suggests that:
A. monocular depth cues cannot operate correctly with conflicting cues to size.
B. the cues to distance are more accurate here than the cues to size.
C. perceived size is computed from perceived distance.
D. perceived distance is computed from perceived size.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.2 Size Perception Depends on Distance

OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Gervase is staring at the blades of his ceiling fan, searching for inspiration for a paper that he is writing. When he turns off the fan, he is very surprised that the blades appear to be rotating in the opposite direction. To reassure Gervase that he is not hallucinating, you could tell him about:
A. stroboscopic motion. C. compensatory motion.
B. motion aftereffects. D. motion parallax.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.2 Motion Perception Has Internal and External Cues       OBJ:   5.2F

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Prolonged exposure to movement in one direction ________ the motion detectors responsive to that direction. When the movement stops, the baseline firing rate of detectors for the opposite direction

of motion will be ________ than the firing rate for the detectors that responded to the prolonged movement, leading to motion aftereffects.

A. sensitizes; higher C. fatigues; higher
B. sensitizes; lower D. fatigues; lower

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Motion Perception Has Internal and External Cues       OBJ:   5.2F

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. When a ballerina pirouettes, images of the room move rapidly across her retina. She does not perceive the room as spinning wildly around her while she dances because:
A. she has learned to disregard the retinal motion.
B. she is moving too rapidly for the brain to register the changing images.
C. the circular movement keeps the firing rates of all motion detectors even.
D. her brain adjusts perceived movement for actual head movement.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Motion Perception Has Internal and External Cues       OBJ:   5.2F

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. According to your text, the fact that we find visual illusions so compelling suggests that the mechanisms of perceptual constancy are:
A. often unreliable. C. primarily genetic.
B. mainly conscious. D. largely unconscious.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.2 Object Constancies Help When Perspective Changes    OBJ:   5.2F

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Avalon spends a minute staring directly at a light that activates her L cones. According to opponent-process theory, what color should she see at the center of her vision when she turns away from the light and looks at a blank white wall?
A. green C. red
B. orange D. yellow

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. According to trichromatic theory, damage to your S cones would most likely result in which of the following types of color blindness?
A. red-green C. yellow-red
B. blue-yellow D. red-orange

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. A ganglion cell receives excitatory input from cones that transduce blue light. According to opponent-process theory, what will happen to this same ganglion cell when L cones are activated?
A. It will be excited.
B. It will be inhibited.
C. It will be both excited and inhibited.
D. It will be neither excited nor inhibited.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Based on your knowledge of opponent-process theory, if you stared for a while at a grid of blue and yellow stripes drawn on a page of paper, what would you see when you looked next at a plain white page?
A. a similar grid of stripes, with the yellow and blue stripes reversed
B. a similar grid of stripes, with red replacing yellow and green replacing blue
C. a similar grid of stripes, only in black and white
D. no grid of stripes at all because the ganglion cells have adapted

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Recently, it has been discovered that some people have an extra type of cone other than the three that most people with normal color vision have. What might be different for a person with a fourth type of cone?
A. They would have another form of red-green color blindness.
B. They would only see in black and white.
C. They could distinguish more colors than people with only three cones.
D. Their opponent-processing would be affected so that they no longer saw afterimages.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Ganglion cells that are excited by L cones are:
A. inhibited by only green colors.
B. inhibited by only blue colors.
C. inhibited by both green and blue colors.
D. inhibited by other L cones.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Trichromatic theory best explains ________ , while opponent-process theory best explains ________.
A. hue; saturation C. afterimages; color blindness
B. saturation; hue D. color blindness; afterimages

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Trichromatic theory is based upon:
A. the complementary functioning of three types of cones.
B. the oppositional functioning of two types of ganglion cell.
C. the complementary functioning of three types of ganglion cell.
D. the oppositional functioning of two types of cones.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. You wake up feeling disoriented after a long sleep. When you open your eyes, a scene emerges before you. You cannot tell if you are looking at a scene of toy cars driving around a miniature city or if you are on top of a building looking down at real cars driving around an actual city. This illusion occurs because of a lack of what?
A. shape constancy C. size constancy
B. color constancy D. lightness constancy

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2F               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Jim is driving down the highway one night when he notices a flashing sign that is directing traffic toward the right. He notices that the sign appears to consist of a steady stream of arrows moving toward the right. The next day, he sees the sign in the daylight and realizes that it has no moving parts. What was responsible for Jim’s perception of arrows moving toward the right when he saw the sign the night before?
A. motion aftereffects C. shape constancy
B. stroboscopic movement D. linear perspective

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2F               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Wavelengths of light are to ________ constancy as differences in light reflected off various objects are to ________constancy.
A. size; shape C. lightness; color
B. shape; size D. color; lightness

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.2 How Are We Able to See?

OBJ:   5.2F               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Ultimately, changes in air pressure underlie the sense of:
A. audition. C. gustation.
B. olfaction. D. vision.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.3 Audition Results from Changes in Air Pressure

OBJ:   5.3A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. If a key is pressed on a piano, the frequency of the resulting sound waves will determine the ________, and the amplitude will determine the ________ of the perceived musical note.
A. timbre; intensity C. loudness; pitch
B. intensity; timbre D. pitch; loudness

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.3 Audition Results from Changes in Air Pressure

OBJ:   5.3A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. With respect to the properties of the sound wave, a higher-pitched sound is one that is higher in ________, which is measured in ________.
A. amplitude; hertz C. frequency; hertz
B. amplitude; decibels D. frequency; decibels

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.3 Audition Results from Changes in Air Pressure

OBJ:   5.3A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Juan and Joseph are opera singers. Juan is a baritone. Joseph is a tenor; his voice is higher-pitched. With respect to their physical properties, the sound waves corresponding to Juan’s voice are lower in ________ than those corresponding to Joseph’s voice; that is, they are lower in ________.
A. frequency; decibels C. amplitude; decibels
B. frequency; hertz D. amplitude; hertz

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.3 Audition Results from Changes in Air Pressure

OBJ:   5.3A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The process by which a sound is transformed into a neural signal involves which of the following sequences of transformations?
A. sound wave à eardrum vibration à pressure wave in fluid
B. eardrum vibration à pressure wave in fluid à sound wave
C. sound wave à pressure wave in fluid à eardrum vibration
D. eardrum vibration à sound wave à pressure wave in fluid

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.3 Audition Results from Changes in Air Pressure

OBJ:   5.3A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Dogs can hear higher-frequency sounds than people can. This fact suggests that there is an anatomical difference in the:
A. ear drum. C. auditory nerve.
B. ossicles. D. basilar membrane.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.3 Audition Results from Changes in Air Pressure

OBJ:   5.3B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. What is retained by people with hearing aids but lost in people who receive cochlear implants?
A. the cochlea itself C. residual normal hearing
B. perception of middle frequencies D. the ear drum

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.3 Pitch Is Encoded by Frequency and Location

OBJ:   5.3C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The attitude of a large segment of the deaf community to cochlear implants is that children should:
A. be given implants early enough to allow language development.
B. be given implants after they have learned to sign.
C. not be given implants in order to preserve deaf culture.
D. be given implants only if they have hearing parents.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.3 Cochlear Implants Assist the Hearing Impaired

OBJ:   5.3C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Cameron has an inner ear infection. In addition to the pain in his ear, Cameron is most likely to:
A. develop double vision.
B. have trouble locating himself in space.
C. lose his appetite.
D. feel dizzy.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.3 Audition Results from Changes in Air Pressure

OBJ:   5.3A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. Yuming becomes nauseous while driving down a curvy mountain road. Her uncomfortable feeling is due to:
A. the feedback receptors of her kinesthetic system getting overloaded.
B. conflicting signals from the visual and vestibular systems.
C. conflicting signals from the visual and kinesthetic systems.
D. the feedback receptors of her vestibular system getting overloaded.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.3 Audition Results from Changes in Air Pressure

OBJ:   5.3A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. The auditory neurons extending from the ________ reach out with their axons to the primary auditory cortex (A1) in the ________.
A. thalamus; parietal lobe C. parietal lobe; thalamus
B. thalamus; temporal lobe D. temporal lobe; thalamus

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.3 Audition Results from Changes in Air Pressure

OBJ:   5.3A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The primary auditory cortex is located in which brain lobe?
A. frontal C. occipital
B. temporal D. parietal

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.3 Audition Results from Changes in Air Pressure

OBJ:   5.3A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Prolonged exposure to loud noises affects the hair cells that are closest to the oval window first. What types of sounds might a person with noise-induced hearing loss have the most trouble detecting?
A. low frequency C. high amplitude
B. high frequency D. temporally coded

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.3 How Are We Able to Hear?

OBJ:   5.3B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Amanda plays the violin professionally and can easily distinguish between a high C note and a high

B note. What kind of process is responsible for Amanda’s ability to make this distinction and where does it take place?

A. place coding; base of basilar membrane
B. temporal coding; tip of basilar membrane
C. place coding; tip of basilar membrane
D. temporal coding; base of basilar membrane

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.3 How Are We Able to Hear?

OBJ:   5.3B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Imagine a very tiny person is walking through the auditory tract, from the ear canal through to the auditory nerve. When that tiny person reaches the cochlea and walks along the basilar membrane, ________ frequency sounds will disturb their walk most at the base of the cochlea, and ________ frequency sounds will disturb their walk most at the tip of the cochlea.
A. loud; soft C. high; low
B. soft; loud D. low; high

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.3 How Are We Able to Hear?

OBJ:   5.3B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Whales and elephants have the ability to distinguish much lower frequency sounds than humans can. What kind of process might be more developed in a whale or elephant’s cochlea than it is in a human’s cochlea?
A. temporal coding C. localizing sound
B. place coding D. amplitude discrimination

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.3 How Are We Able to Hear?

OBJ:   5.3B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Place coding occurs mostly at the ________of the basilar membrane, while temporal coding takes place mostly at the ________ of the basilar membrane.
A. base; tip C. outer duct; inner duct
B. tip; base D. inner duct; outer duct

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.3 How Are We Able to Hear?

OBJ:   5.3B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. The base of the cochlea responds to ________ sounds, while the tip of the cochlea responds to ________ sounds.
A. low amplitude; high amplitude C. low frequency; high frequency
B. high amplitude; low amplitude D. high frequency; low frequency

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.3 How Are We Able to Hear?

OBJ:   5.3B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Temporal coding encodes ________ sounds, while place coding encodes ________ sounds.
A. low amplitude; high amplitude C. low frequency; high frequency
B. high amplitude; low amplitude D. high frequency; low frequency

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.3 How Are We Able to Hear?

OBJ:   5.3B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Sean is three years old and was born with a severe hearing impairment, but his parents both have normal hearing. Sean currently has hearing aids to help him hear, but his parents are considering a cochlear implant for him. What would be most likely to keep Sean’s parents from agreeing to the procedure?
A. They want him to be welcomed by the deaf community.
B. They fear that he will lose his residual hearing.
C. They are afraid he will be unable to learn sign language.
D. They are worried that he is too young to receive the implant.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.3 How Are We Able to Hear?

OBJ:   5.3C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Torri is two years old and was born with a severe hearing impairment. Her parents both have congenital hearing loss as well. Torri currently has hearing aids to help her hear, but her parents are considering a cochlear implant for her. What would be most likely to keep Torri’s parents from agreeing to the procedure?
A. They want her to be welcomed by the deaf community.
B. They fear that she will lose her residual hearing.
C. They are afraid she will be unable to learn sign language.
D. They are worried that she is too young to receive the implant.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.3 How Are We Able to Hear?

OBJ:   5.3C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Cochlear implants are a mechanical means of reproducing which function of the auditory system?
A. amplifying sound C. localizing sound
B. transducing sound D. perceiving sound

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.3 How Are We Able to Hear?

OBJ:   5.3C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which part of the auditory system is most commonly damaged in people who receive cochlear implants?
A. temporal lobes C. ossicles
B. auditory nerve D. hair cells

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.3 How Are We Able to Hear?

OBJ:   5.3C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which of the following characteristics is NOT a basic quality of taste?
A. sweet C. salty
B. umami D. sharp

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.4 There Are Five Basic Taste Sensations

OBJ:   5.4A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Which of the following taste sensations was most recently discovered?
A. sweet C. bitter
B. sour D. umami

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.4 There Are Five Basic Taste Sensations

OBJ:   5.4A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. In a single person, gustation involves ________ taste buds, located on the ________.
A. 800 to 1,000; tongue
B. 8,000 to 10,000: tongue, throat, and mouth
C. 800 to 1,000; tongue, throat, and mouth
D. 8,000 to 10,000; tongue

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.4 How Are We Able to Taste?

OBJ:   5.4A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. How are taste buds distributed throughout the tongue and mouth?
A. Different regions of the tongue and mouth are more sensitive to certain tastes.
B. The taste buds are distributed fairly uniformly throughout the tongue and mouth.
C. Most of the taste buds are localized to particular regions of the tongue and mouth.
D. Depending on the taste quality, the taste buds can be either localized or spread uniformly.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.4 How Are We Able to Taste?

OBJ:   5.4A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The taste sensation of umami is a result of the detection of ________, which is a naturally occurring substance found in foods such as meat, some cheeses, and mushrooms.
A. gluten C. fiber
B. glutamate D. capsaicin

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.4 There Are Five Basic Taste Sensations

OBJ:   5.4A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Sadafa loves Indian food but is careful about what he eats because it hurts his tongue when he eats bitter food. Sadafa most likely is:
A. a supertaster and has few taste buds in his mouth.
B. a supertaster with a very large number of taste buds in his mouth.
C. not a supertaster and has a large number of pain receptors in his mouth.
D. not a supertaster and has few pain receptors in his mouth.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.4 There Are Five Basic Taste Sensations

OBJ:   5.4A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. Supertasters are those who experience especially intense taste sensations. This trait is determined largely by:
A. the environment. C. genetics.
B. one’s culture. D. environmental and genetic factors.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.4 There Are Five Basic Taste Sensations

OBJ:   5.4A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Based on your text’s discussion of cultural influences on taste, which of the following statements is most accurate?
A. Culture influences taste preferences.
B. Culture has little influence on taste preferences.
C. Culture is less important than genetics when it comes to taste preferences.
D. Culture is more important than genetics when it comes to taste preferences.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.4 Culture Influences Taste Preferences

OBJ:   5.4B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 3, Ethical and Social Responsibility in a Diverse World MSC:              Understanding

 

  1. Callie is pregnant. She has never liked vegetables and rarely eats them. However, she does not want her baby to have the same bad eating habits. If Callie wants her baby to grow up to enjoy the taste of vegetables, the most effective thing she can do is:
A. eat vegetables while she is pregnant and nursing.
B. give the baby strained vegetables as one of his or her first solid foods.
C. avoid eating meat while she is pregnant and nursing.
D. limit the amount of meat the baby is fed when he starts to eat solid food.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.4 Culture Influences Taste Preferences

OBJ:   5.4B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. David’s favorite food is pizza. Which part of David’s gustatory system is responsible for tranducing the taste of pizza for David?
A. salt receptors C. umami receptors
B. papillae D. glossopharyngeal nerves

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.4 How Are We Able to Taste?

OBJ:   5.4A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The recent salted caramel fad most likely owes its popularity to the activation of which two taste receptors?
A. umami and salty C. sweet and salty
B. salty and bitter D. sweet and sour

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.4 How Are We Able to Taste?

OBJ:   5.4A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Your aversion to tuna fish flavored ice cream is most likely a result of what influence?
A. top-down perceptual processing C. top-down sensory processing
B. bottom-up perceptual processing D. bottom-up sensory processing

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.4 How Are We Able to Taste?

OBJ:   5.4B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Sara loves the taste of fish soup because her mother always made it on special holidays when she was growing up. What part of Sara’s gustatory system was most likely changed by this experience?
A. papillae C. thalamus
B. taste buds D. frontal lobe

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.4 How Are We Able to Taste?

OBJ:   5.4B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Aida eats green vegetables throughout her pregnancy and while she is nursing her baby because she wants her baby to have a preference for these healthy foods. Aida knows that:
A. culture influences taste preferences.
B. babies’ taste buds adapt to tastes in utero.
C. babies’ sense of taste is much more sensitive than adults’.
D. babies’ sweet receptors can adapt to sense bitter vegetables as sweet.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.4 How Are We Able to Taste?

OBJ:   5.4B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 3, Ethical and Social Responsibility in a Diverse World MSC:              Applying

 

  1. Culture’s influence on taste preferences is most like:
A. the influence of light waves on photoreceptors.
B. the influence of distraction on pain.
C. our ability to distinguish hot from cold.
D. our ability to discriminate sound frequencies.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.4 How Are We Able to Taste?

OBJ:   5.4B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Analyzing

 

  1. Taste receptor cells are to the gustatory system as:
A. hair cells are to the auditory system.
B. thalamic cells are to the olfactory system.
C. ganglion cells are to the visual system.
D. the pain gate is to haptic perception.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.4 How Are We Able to Taste?

OBJ:   5.4B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. What is the primary purpose of cells in the olfactory bulb?
A. to receive nerve impulses and pass them through the thalamus
B. to receive nerve impulses and relay the signal to other brain areas
C. to receive odorants and pass them through the thalamus
D. to receive odorants and relay the signal to other brain areas

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.5 Smell Detects Odorants

OBJ:   5.5A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Regarding smell, which of the following statements is probably most accurate?
A. People are better at discriminating among odors than they are at identifying them; men generally outperform women.
B. People are better at discriminating among odors than they are at identifying them; women generally outperform men.
C. People are better at identifying odors than they are at discriminating among them; men generally outperform women.
D. People are better at identifying odors than they are at discriminating among them; women generally outperform men.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.5 Smell Detects Odorants

OBJ:   5.5A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. When Margot was a child, her mother baked bread on Fridays. As an adult, whenever Margot smells bread baking she remembers her mother and feels happy. The mood and memories result from the processing of smell information in the:
A. thalamus. C. haptic receptor.
B. olfactory epithelium. D. prefrontal cortex.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.5 Smell Detects Odorants

OBJ:   5.5A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. An odor is most likely encoded by a(n):
A. single olfactory receptor specialized for that odor.
B. activation pattern across several olfactory receptor types.
C. single olfactory and a single gustatory receptor.
D. activation pattern across several olfactory and gustatory receptor types.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.5 Smell Detects Odorants

OBJ:   5.5A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. In smell, ________ are chemicals released by animals that cause physiological and behavioral effects on other members of the same species.
A. odorants C. pheromones
B. hormones D. epithelia

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.5 Pheromones Are Processed Like Olfactory Stimuli       OBJ:   5.5B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Our perception of ________ is unusual in that it does not involve the thalamus.
A. taste C. smell
B. balance D. pain

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.5 Smell Detects Odorants

OBJ:   5.5A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Artists did not learn to represent depth in paintings until the Renaissance. This fact suggests that:
A. the use of these cues is not easily accessible to conscious analysis.
B. these cues mimic but are not the same as those available in the world.
C. it was counterintuitive to think that three dimensions could be represented in two dimensions.
D. depth is a matter of perception and so cannot be accurately depicted.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.2 Depth Perception Is Important for Locating Objects      OBJ:   5.2E

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. An expert at wine discrimination can tell the differences among hundreds of different wines. Which of the following is likely to be the most developed in such a person?
A. gustatory perception C. olfactory perception
B. gustatory sensation D. olfactory sensation

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.5 How Are We Able to Smell?

OBJ:   5.5A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Simon has detected the complex aroma of tabbouleh. He follows the scent into the kitchen and sees a fresh bowl of tabbouleh on the kitchen counter. Where might the olfactory and visual information about the tabbouleh be integrated in Simon’s perceptual system?
A. thalamus C. frontal lobe
B. olfactory bulb D. occipital lobe

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.5 How Are We Able to Smell?

OBJ:   5.5A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Rich brought his wife a bouquet of flowers. She can tell the difference between the lilies and the lilacs most likely because of the:
A. extremely large olfactory bulb that humans possess.
B. neural projections to her amygdala.
C. activity of a specific olfactory receptor.
D. pattern of activity of her olfactory receptors.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.5 How Are We Able to Smell?

OBJ:   5.5A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Olfactory receptors are embedded in the:
A. olfactory bulb. C. basilar membrane.
B. olfactory epithelium. D. papillae.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.5 How Are We Able to Smell?

OBJ:   5.5A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Studies have shown that women who smell T-shirts worn by different men will express a preference for shirts worn by men who have a complementary immune system to their own. This ability has been taken as evidence of:
A. pheromone processing in humans.
B. a conscious perception of the most desirable mates.
C. human olfactory processing equivalent to that of dogs’.
D. connectivity between the olfactory bulb and the amygdala.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.5 How Are We Able to Smell?

OBJ:   5.5B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Victoria’s attraction to her coworker Mel has been unconsciously increasing for months. What might be responsible for this attraction?
A. hair cell sensitivity C. pheromones
B. umami receptors D. thalamic activity

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.5 How Are We Able to Smell?

OBJ:   5.5B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Certain perfume companies advertise that their perfumes can help people attract a mate. If these perfumes work as advertised, we can take that as evidence of:
A. connectivity between vision and olfaction.
B. pheromone perception in humans.
C. olfactory input to the thalamus.
D. top-down processing of smell.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.5 How Are We Able to Smell?

OBJ:   5.5B

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. What do olfaction and pheromone processing have in common in many nonhuman mammals?
A. Receptor cells are embedded in the same place.
B. They are nearly identical to the same types of processing in humans.
C. Both senses send neural projections to the thalamus.
D. Both senses exert a strong influence on the visual system.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.5 How Are We Able to Smell?

OBJ:   5.5B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Pheromone receptors are most like:
A. auditory hair cells. C. photoreceptors.
B. olfactory receptors. D. taste buds.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.5 How Are We Able to Smell?

OBJ:   5.5B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. What is NOT likely part of the pathway that pheromone information travels to the brain?
A. pheromone receptors C. prefrontal cortex
B. amygdala D. thalamus

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.5 How Are We Able to Smell?

OBJ:   5.5B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Temperature, pain, and pressure are components of the ________ sense.
A. olfactory C. gustatory
B. vestibular D. haptic

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.6 How Are We Able to Feel Touch and Pain?

OBJ:   5.6A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Temperature receptors that signify heat when they are activated:
A. also signify cold when they are inhibited.
B. generally signify cold when they are inactive.
C. oppose the activity of receptors signifying cold.
D. may respond simultaneously with receptors signifying cold.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.6 The Skin Contains Sensory Receptors for Touch          OBJ:   5.6A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Of the types of haptic receptors described in your text, those that respond to ________ are found throughout the body, not just in the skin.
A. pain C. vibration
B. cold D. steady pressure

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.6 There Are Two Types of Pain

OBJ:   5.6A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Meg is rehearsing the solo for her dance performance. In order to perform her solo well, Meg has to be aware of the position of her arms and legs in space. To do this, Meg relies on her ________ sense.
A. motion C. kinesthetic
B. olfactory D. visual

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.6 How Are We Able to Feel Touch and Pain?

OBJ:   5.6A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Haptic experiences are the result of:
A. the integration of multiple signals and higher-level mental processes.
B. the integration of signals from all of our senses.
C. the integration of pressure and pain signals.
D. discrete tactile sensations unaffected by higher-level mental processes.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate

REF:   5.6 The Skin Contains Sensory Receptors for Touch          OBJ:   5.6A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Ouch! A paper cut! The sharp sting travels along ________ pain fibers, which are ________.
A. slow; unmyelinated C. fast; unmyelinated
B. slow; myelinated D. fast; myelinated

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.6 There Are Two Types of Pain

OBJ:   5.6B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Days after breaking his nose in a football game, Ben still perceives a dull pain in his nose. The dull ache travels along ________ pain fibers, which are ________.
A. slow; unmyelinated C. fast; unmyelinated
B. slow; myelinated D. fast; myelinated

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.6 There Are Two Types of Pain

OBJ:   5.6B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Avi broke his ankle skiing. At first, he felt a sharp and intense pain. The next day, the sharp pain was gone, but his ankle ached almost all the time. The sharp immediate pain was due to ________; the later aching pain was due to ________.
A. unmyelinated axons; myelinated axons
B. myelinated axons; unmyelinated axons
C. pain receptors; pressure receptors
D. pressure receptors; pain receptors

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.6 There Are Two Types of Pain

OBJ:   5.6B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. As Devin runs to catch the quarterback’s throw, he automatically checks the position of his arms and hands and adjusts them to the path of the ball. Which sense allows him to position his hands and arms so well?
A. kinesthetic C. olfactory
B. vestibular D. visual

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.6 How Are We Able to Feel Touch and Pain?

OBJ:   5.6A               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. After leaving the thalamus, axons projecting from tactile sensory neurons project to the ________ in the ________ lobe.
A. homunculus; parietal
B. homunculus; temporal
C. primary somatosensory cortex; parietal
D. primary somatosensory cortex; temporal

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy

REF:   5.6 The Skin Contains Sensory Receptors for Touch          OBJ:   5.6A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology                    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Imagine you are participating in a friend’s psychology experiment. She asks you to close your eyes and hold out your finger. She tells you that she will prick your finger with a needle in the same place several times and then will start to prick other places. Your task is to tell her when you first feel the pin prick in a different place. She then repeats the same process, but starts on your back. You might predict that the distance at which you could first detect a pin prick in a new location would be:
A. much smaller on the finger than the back.
B. much smaller on the back than the finger.
C. approximately equal in the two places.
D. a little bit smaller on the back than the finger.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult

REF:   5.6 The Skin Contains Sensory Receptors for Touch          OBJ:   5.6A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. According to gate control theory, pain:
A. is overwhelmingly biological.
B. is mainly psychological.
C. is largely immune to cultural influences.
D. reflects an interaction among biological, psychological, and cultural influences.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.6 There Are Two Types of Pain

OBJ:   5.6C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 3, Ethical and Social Responsibility in a Diverse World MSC:              Remembering

 

  1. The pain control gate is located in the:
A. thalamus. C. spinal cord.
B. haptic receptors. D. frontal lobe.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.6 There Are Two Types of Pain

OBJ:   5.6C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Pain medications such as Novocain work by:
A. changing pain stimuli so that they cannot be received by sensory pain neurons.
B. blocking transmission from sensory pain neurons to the brain.
C. integrating information from sensory pain neurons and sensory relief neurons.
D. diverting signals from the sensory pain neurons to the thalamus.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.6 There Are Two Types of Pain

OBJ:   5.6C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Cordelia is massaging her shoulders to rid herself of a tension headache. According to gate control theory, the massage should:
A. distract Cordelia from the headache, closing the pain gate “from the brain down.”
B. intensify the pain by sending additional sensory messages to the brain.
C. have little effect.
D. activate large sensory nerves, closing the pain gate “from the spinal cord up.”

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.6 There Are Two Types of Pain

OBJ:   5.6C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. Cognitive factors, including ________, can close the neural gate in the spinal cord that allows the signals of pain to be sent to the brain.
A. stress C. distraction
B. anxiety D. fear

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.6 There Are Two Types of Pain

OBJ:   5.6C               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Kwamie has broken his wrist. His friend Sam has taken him to the ER. While they are waiting, Sam starts an argument with Kwamie about the presidential election. While they are arguing, Kwamie is feeling very little pain. This result has most likely occurred because:
A. anger is incompatible with the experience of pain.
B. pain always decreases over time.
C. focusing on the argument closed the pain gate.
D. Kwamie’s nerve fibers thickened as a physical symptom of anger.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.6 There Are Two Types of Pain

OBJ:   5.6C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. Bincheng has been taught to visualize the pain from his migraine headaches as simply a part of his experience of life. While he is engaging in this visualization, an fMRI scan of his brain would be likely to show ________ in activity while his perceptual experience of pain would likely ________.
A. a change; increase C. a change; decrease
B. no change; increase D. no change; decrease

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   5.6 There Are Two Types of Pain

OBJ:   5.6C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Understanding

 

  1. If your leg were to become caught and squeezed in a bear trap, which sensation would you be LEAST likely to experience?
A. warmth and cold C. pain
B. stretching and steady pressure D. continued vibration

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.6 How Are We Able to Feel Touch and Pain?

OBJ:   5.6A

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

 

  1. A new, complex organism discovered by scientists can be severely injured by any exposure to hydrogen peroxide. What type of haptic receptor is this organism likely to have evolved that responds to hydrogen peroxide?
A. fast-acting pain receptor C. gate controlled receptors
B. slow-acting pain receptor D. kinesthetic receptors

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.6 How Are We Able to Feel Touch and Pain?

OBJ:   5.6B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Randall does not immediately sense pain when he stays out too long in the snow, but he feels a painful sensation in his frostbitten toes for days afterward. Randall’s inability to sense pain immediately is most likely due to damage to his:
A. somatosensory cortex. C. fast fibers.
B. slow fibers. D. thalamus.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.6 How Are We Able to Feel Touch and Pain?

OBJ:   5.6B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. When Angelica plunges her hand into a bucket of ice water, ________ axons immediately carry pain information to her brain. When Erica sprains her ankle playing soccer, ________ axons carry pain information to her brain for weeks.
A. unmyelinated; myelinated C. temperature; pressure
B. myelinated; unmyelinated D. pressure; temperature

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.6 How Are We Able to Feel Touch and Pain?

OBJ:   5.6B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. The pain gate can theoretically reduce the sensation of pain sent by:
A. unmyelinated axons only.
B. myelinated axons only.
C. both unmyelinated and myelinated axons.
D. neither unmyelinated nor myelinated axons.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.6 How Are We Able to Feel Touch and Pain?

OBJ:   5.6B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. The sudden, sharp pain you feel when you hit your finger with a hammer travels across what type of axon?
A. myelinated C. kinesthetic
B. unmyelinated D. stretch

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   5.6 How Are We Able to Feel Touch and Pain?

OBJ:   5.6B               NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. The attentional focus mechanism suggested by gate control theory relies on the notion of what kind of processing?
A. temporal coding C. bottom-up
B. place coding D. top-down

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   5.6 How Are We Able to Feel Touch and Pain?

OBJ:   5.6C

NAT:  APA Goal 1, Knowledge Base in Psychology | APA Goal 2, Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking         MSC:           Applying

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