Operations And Supply Chain Management 9th Edition Roberta Russell – Test Bank

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Complete Test Bank With Answers

 

 

 

Sample Questions Posted Below

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5:
Service Design

 

 

True/False

 

 

 

  1. The service sector accounts for over 80 percent of employment in the United States.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 1

 

 

  1. Service design and improvement techniques cannot be applied to societal problems such as education, healthcare, and government services.

Ans: False

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 1

 

 

  1. It is widely accepted that the effective design and the efficient operation of services are critical to the health of the U.S. economy.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 1

 

 

  1. In general, services are acts, deeds, or performances that provide a customer time, place, form, or psychological utility.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 2

 

 

  1. Almost all consumer products consist of some combination of facilitating goods and facilitating services.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: LO 2

 

 

  1. Service companies are centralized and geographically concentrated.

 

Ans: False

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 2

 

  1. In general, a service and its delivery system are inseparable.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 2

 

 

  1. A service package defines the target market and the desired customer experience.

Ans: False

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 3

 

 

  1. The service concept also defines how a service differs from other similar products and how it will compete in the marketplace.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Medium

 

Learning Objective: LO 3

 

 

  1. When designing a service, performance specifications are converted into design specifications, and finally, delivery specifications,

Ans: True

Difficulty: Medium

 

Learning Objective: LO 3

 

 

  1. Service processes can be classified by the degree of labor intensity and customization.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 3

 

 

  1. The service-process matrix is based on two characteristics: labor intensity and volume.

 

Ans: False

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 3

 

  1. The negative exponential distribution is the probability distribution most commonly used to describe service times.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 4

 

  1. The tradeoff between the cost of improved service and the cost of making customers wait provides the basis of waiting line analysis.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. A single waiting line model can be applied to every type of waiting line system.

Ans: False

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. Waiting lines form only when service operations are understaffed.

Ans: False

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. Waiting lines form because customers arrival times and service times are not always equal.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. The calling population is the source of customers used in waiting line analysis.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. The number of arrivals per unit time to a service facility is often described by a Poisson distribution.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. Balking occurs when a customer waiting in a line moves from one line to another because he believes it is moving faster.

Ans: False

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. If service times are exponentially distributed then service rates are normally distributed.

Ans: False

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. If the average service rate is smaller than the average arrival rate an infinitely large waiting line (queue) will form.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. Queue discipline specifies the order in which waiting customers are served.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. The number of parallel servers in waiting line analysis is referred to as the number of phases.

Ans: False

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

 

  1. The constant average values of operating characteristics a system attains after a long time is referred to as a steady state.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. As the level of service improves in a waiting line system the cost of service usually increases.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. Service quality in waiting line systems sometimes depends on the psychology of waiting.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. A waiting line system is said to have a finite calling population if the size of the population of customers from which arrivals originate is known.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. Waiting line analysis should be applied only to situations with an infinite calling population.

Ans: False

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. Channels refers to the number of parallel servers in a waiting line system.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. In general, as the level of service improves, the cost of service increases.

Ans: True

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. One of the basic assumptions for the single-server model is that the calling population is finite.

Ans: False

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

 

Multiple Choice

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following is not a characteristic of a service?
  2. Intangible
  3. Variable output
  4. Difficult to emulate
  5. Perishable

Ans: C

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 2

 

  1. Which of the following is not a characteristic of a service?
  2. Tangible
  3. Variable output
  4. Difficult to emulate
  5. Perishable

Ans: A

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 2

 

  1. In a waiting line system, the ___________ reflects the probability that the server is busy and the customer must wait.
  1. utilization factor
  2. queue discipline
  3. average number of customers in the system
  4. probability the system is idle

Ans: A

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 2

 

  1. A dentist office is an example of a
  2. service factory.
  3. mass service.
  4. service shop.
  5. professional service.

Ans: D

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 3

 

 

  1. An airline is an example of a
  2. service factory.
  3. mass service.
  4. service shop.
  5. professional service.

Ans: A

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 3

 

 

  1. A grocery store is an example of a
  2. service factory.
  3. mass service.
  4. service shop.
  5. professional service.

Ans: B

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 3

 

 

  1. A teacher is an example of a
  2. service factory.
  3. mass service.
  4. service shop.
  5. professional service.

Ans: C

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 3

 

 

  1. Which of the following is not a basic element of a waiting line?
  1. arrivals
  2. servers
  3. cost of waiting
  4. waiting line structure

Ans: C

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. The ________________ is the source of customers for a waiting line system.
  1. calling population
  2. arrival rate
  3. service line channel
  4. service line phase

 

Ans: A

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. The number of arrivals per unit of time at a service facility can frequently be described by a
  1. normal distribution.
  2. Poisson distribution.
  3. binomial distribution.
  4. Beta distribution.

Ans: B

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. The ______________ refers to the order in which waiting customers are served.
  1. calling population
  2. queue discipline
  3. number of channels
  4. service rate

Ans: B

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. The number of channels in a queuing process
    1. denotes the number of servers in sequence a customer must go through.
    2. denotes the size of the calling population.
    3. denotes the number of parallel servers for servicing arriving customers.
    4. denotes the average queue length.

Ans: C

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. In general, as the number of servers in a waiting line system increases,
  1. service cost increases and waiting cost decreases.
  2. service cost decreases and waiting cost increases.
  3. both service cost and waiting cost increase.
  4. both service cost and waiting cost decrease.

 

Ans: A

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. If the average time to serve a customer is 3 minutes, then the service rate, µ, is
  1. 3 per hour.
  2. 12 per hour.
  3. 16 per hour.
  4. 20 per hour.

Ans: D

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: µ =60/3=20 per hour

 

 

 

  1. If, on average, it takes 90 seconds to serve a customer then the hourly service rate, µ, is
  1. 90 per hour.
  2. 40 per hour.
  3. 30 per hour.
  4. 1.5 per hour.

Ans: B

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: µ=60/(90/60)=40 per hour

 

 

 

  1. Consider an espresso stand with a single barista. Customers arrive at the rate of 20 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. Service times are exponentially distributed with a mean service time of 2 minutes per customer. What is the service rate per hour for the espresso stand?
  1. 30 customers
  2. 20 customers
  3. 15 customers
  4. 2 customers

Ans: A

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: µ=60/2=30 per hour

 

 

  1. Consider an espresso stand with a single barista. Customers arrive at the stand at the rate of 28 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. Service times are exponentially distributed with a service rate of 35 customers per hour. The probability that the server is busy is
  1. 0.20
  2. 0.60
  3. 0.80
  4. 1.00

Ans: C

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: P=28/35=0.20

 

 

 

  1. Consider an espresso stand with a single barista. Customers arrive at the stand at the rate of 28 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. Service times are exponentially distributed with a service rate of 35 customers per hour. The probability that the server is idle is
  1. 0.20
  2. 0.60
  3. 0.80
  4. 1.00

Ans: A

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Po=1-28/35=0.20

 

 

  1. Consider an espresso stand with a single barista. Customers arrive at the stand at the rate of 28 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. Service times are exponentially distributed with a service rate of 35 customers per hour. The probability that there are exactly 3 customers in the system is
  1. 0.0000
  2. 0.1024
  3. 0.4096
  4. 0.5120

Ans: B

Difficulty: Moderate

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

Solution: P3=(28/35)*(28/35)*28/35*0.20=0.1024

 

 

  1. Consider an espresso stand with a single barista. Customers arrive at the stand at the rate of 28 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. Service times are exponentially distributed with a service rate of 35 customers per hour. The probability that there are more than 2 customers in the system is
  1. 0.128
  2. 0.488
  3. 0.512
  4. 0.640

Ans: C

Difficulty: Hard

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: P2ormore=1-(P0+P1+P3)=1-(0.2+0.16+0.1024)=0.512

 

 

  1. Consider an espresso stand with a single barista. Customers arrive at the stand at the rate of 28 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. Service times are exponentially distributed with a service rate of 35 customers per hour. The average number of customers waiting in line for service is
  1. 4.0
  2. 3.8
  3. 3.5
  4. 3.2

Ans: D

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Lq=28*28/(35*7)=3.2

 

 

  1. Consider an espresso stand with a single barista. Customers arrive at the stand at the rate of 28 per hour according to a Poisson distribution.  Service times are exponentially distributed with a service rate of 35 customers per hour. The average number of customers in the system (i.e., waiting and being served) is
  1. 4.0
  2. 3.8
  3. 3.2
  4. 2.0

Ans: A

Difficulty: Moderate

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: L=28/(35-28)=4.0

 

 

  1. Consider an espresso stand with a single barista. Customers arrive at the stand at the rate of 28 per hour according to a Poisson distribution.  Service times are exponentially distributed with a service rate of 35 customers per hour. The average time in minutes a customer spends waiting in line for service is
  1. 0.114 minute.
  2. 0.143 minute.
  3. 6.84 minutes.
  4. 8.58 minutes.

Ans: C

Difficulty: Hard

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Wq=28/(35*7)*60=6.84

 

 

  1. Consider an espresso stand with a single barista. Customers arrive at the stand at the rate of 28 per hour according to a Poisson distribution.  Service times are exponentially distributed with a service rate of 35 customers per hour. The average time in minutes a customer spends in the system (i.e., waiting and being served) is
  1. 0.114 minute
  2. 0.143 minute
  3. 6.84 minutes
  4. 8.58 minutes

Ans: D

Difficulty: Moderate

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: W=1/(35-28)*60=8.58

 

 

  1. Consider an espresso stand with a single barista. Customers arrive to the stand at the rate of 28 per hour according to a Poisson distribution.  Service times are exponentially distributed with a service rate of 35 customers per minute. If the arrival rate remains at 28 customers per hour and the stand’s manager wants to have the average time a customer spends in the system (i.e., wait time and service time) to be a maximum of 6 minutes on average, then the service rate must
  1. decrease by 2 to 33 customers per hour.
  2. decrease by 3 to 32 customers per hour.
  3. increase by 3 to 38 customers per hour.
  4. increase by 2 to 37 customers per hour.

Ans: C

Difficulty: Hard

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: 6/60 = 0.1 hr.; 0.1 = 1/(µ − 28); µ = 38

 

 

 

  1. A small diner has one employee and a counter with seating for 8 customers.  The diner does not package food for takeout.  Customers arrive at the diner at the rate of 20 per hour (Poisson distributed).  Service times are exponentially distributed and average 24 per hour.  Customers that arrive when all seats are taken do not enter the diner.  What is the probability that there are no customers in the diner?
  1. 2067
  2. 7933
  3. 8333
  4. 1667

Ans: a

Difficulty: Moderate

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.2

 

 

 

  1. A small diner has one employee and a counter with seating for 8 customers.  The diner does not package food for take out.  Customers arrive at the diner at the rate of 20 per hour (Poisson distributed).  Service times are exponentially distributed and average 24 per hour.  Customers that arrive when all seats are taken do not enter the diner.  What is the probability that the diner is full and an arriving customer does not enter?
  1. 0.8333
  2. 0.1667
  3. 0.2067
  4. 0.0481

Ans: D

Difficulty: Hard

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.2

 

 

 

  1. A small diner has one employee and a counter with seating for 8 customers.  The diner does not package food for takeout.  Customers arrive at the diner at the rate of 20 per hour (Poisson distributed).  Service times are exponentially distributed and average 24 per hour.  Customers that arrive when all seats are taken do not enter the diner.  What is the average number of customers in the diner?
  1. 2.0432
  2. 2.8364
  3. 3.7536
  4. 5.4837

Ans: B

Difficulty: Moderate

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.2

 

 

 

  1. A small diner has one employee and a counter with seating for 8 customers.  The diner does not package food for takeout.  Customers arrive at the diner at the rate of 20 per hour (Poisson distributed).  Service times are exponentially distributed and average 24 per hour.  Customers that arrive when all seats are taken do not enter the diner.  What is the average number of customers waiting (average queue length)?
  1. 2.0432
  2. 2.8364
  3. 3.9785
  4. 5.9782

Ans: A

Difficulty: Hard

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.2

 

 

 

  1. A small diner has one employee and a counter with seating for 8 customers.  The diner does not package food for takeout.  Customers arrive at the diner at the rate of 20 per hour (Poisson distributed).  Service times are exponentially distributed and average 24 per hour.  Customers that arrive when all seats are taken do not enter the diner.  What is the average time a customer spends in the diner?
  1. 3 minutes
  2. 5.975 minutes
  3. 6.44 minutes
  4. 8.94 minutes

Ans: D

Difficulty: Moderate

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.2

 

 

 

  1. A small diner has one employee and a counter with seating for 8 customers.  The diner does not package food for takeout.  Customers arrive at the diner at the rate of 20 per hour (Poisson distributed).  Service times are exponentially distributed and average 24 per hour.  Customers that arrive when all seats are taken do not enter the diner.  What is the average time a customer spends waiting?
  1. 2.5 minutes
  2. 3.0 minutes
  3. 6.44 minutes
  4. 24 minutes

Ans: C

Difficulty: Hard

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.2

 

 

 

  1. A service counter employs two servers. On average, a server requires 8 minutes to process a customer and service times follow an exponential distribution. Customers arrive at the counter at the rate of 12 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. The service rate per server for this system is
  1. 3.75 customers per hour.
  2. 7.5 customers per hour.
  3. 8 customers per hour.
  4. 16 customers per hour.

Ans: B

Difficulty: Moderate

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.3

 

 

 

  1. A service counter employs two servers. On average, a server requires 8 minutes to process a customer and service times follow an exponential distribution. Customers arrive at the counter at the rate of 12 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. The probability that there are no customers in the system is
  1. 0.800
  2. 0.536
  3. 0.369
  4. 0.111

Ans: D

Difficulty: Hard

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.3

 

 

 

  1. A service counter employs two servers. On average, a server requires 8 minutes to process a customer and service times follow an exponential distribution. Customers arrive at the counter at the rate of 12 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. The probability that an arriving customer must wait for service is
  1. 0.7111
  2. 0.8000
  3. 0.8576
  4. 0.9327

Ans: A

Difficulty: Hard

Feedback: Waiting Line Analysis for Service Improvement

Learning Objective: LO 5

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.3

 

 

 

  1. A service counter employs two servers. On average, a server requires 8 minutes to process a customer and service times follow an exponential distribution. Customers arrive at the counter at the rate of 12 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. On average, the total number of customers in the system (i.e., waiting and being served) would be
  1. 1.600
  2. 2.844
  3. 3.200
  4. 4.444

Ans: D

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.3

 

 

 

  1. A service counter employs two servers. On average, a server requires 8 minutes to process a customer and service times follow an exponential distribution. Customers arrive at the counter at the rate of 12 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. The average number of customers waiting to be served would be
  1. 4.444
  2. 2.844
  3. 1.600
  4. 0.893

Ans: B

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.3

 

 

 

  1. A service counter employs two servers. On average a server requires 8 minutes to process a customer and service times follow an exponential distribution. Customers arrive at the counter at the rate of 12 per hour according to a Poisson distribution. The average amount of time, in minutes, spent in the system (i.e., waiting and being served) is approximately
  1. 0.237 minutes
  2. 14.22 minutes
  3. 22.20 minutes
  4. 33.30 minutes

Ans: C

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.3

 

 

 

  1. A service counter employs two servers.  On average, a server requires 8 minutes to process a customer and service times follow an exponential distribution. Customers arrive at the counter at the rate of 12 per hour according to a Poisson distribution.  The average amount of time spent by a customer waiting in line is approximately
  1. 0.370 minutes
  2. 2.844 minutes
  3. 14.22 minutes
  4. 22.20 minutes

Ans: C

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

Solution: Use Excel Exhibit 5.3

 

 

 

Short Answer

 

 

 

  1. Do waiting lines only form when the service operation is understaffed? Explain?

 

Ans: No. Waiting lines form because people or things arrive at the servicing function, or server, faster than they can be served. This does not mean that the service operation is understaffed or does not have the capacity to handle the influx of customers.  Most businesses and organizations have sufficient serving capacity available to handle its customers in the long run.  Waiting lines result because customers do not arrive at a constant rate, nor are they all served in an equal amount of time.  Customers arrive at random times, and the time required to serve each individually is not the same.  A waiting line is continuously increasing and decreasing in length and in the long-run approaches an average length and waiting time.

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. What are the basic elements of a waiting line? Define each.

 

Ans: The basic elements of a waiting line are the arrivals, the servers, and the waiting line structure.  The simplest type of waiting line system is a single server with a single queue.

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. What is a calling population in terms of a waiting line system?

 

Ans: The calling population is the source of the customers to the waiting line system.  The calling population can be either infinite or finite.  An infinite calling population assumes such a large number of potential customers that it is always possible for one more customer to arrive and be served.  A grocery store is an example of an infinite calling population.  A finite calling population has a specific, countable number of potential customers.  All the customers are waiting in line at the same time; that is, it may occur that there is not one more customer to serve.

Difficulty: Hard

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. What is queue discipline and queue length?

 

Ans: The queue discipline is the order in which waiting customers are served. The most common type of queue discipline is first come, first served.  However, other disciplines are possible. Sometimes customers are scheduled according to a predetermined appointment, or parts are run through a machine center on a last in first out basis.  In manufacturing jobs are sometimes run with the shortest processing time first. Queues can be of an infinite or finite size or length.  An infinite queue can be of any size, with no upper limit, and is the most common queue structure.  A finite queue is limited in size.

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. Briefly describe the traditional cost relationship in waiting line analysis.

 

Ans: There is generally an inverse relationship between the cost of providing service and the cost of making customers wait.  As the level of service, reflected by the number of servers, goes up, the cost of service increases, whereas waiting cost decreases. In the traditional view of waiting line analysis, the level of service should coincide with the minimum point of the total cost curve.

Difficulty: Easy

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. How are waiting line costs and service quality related?

 

Ans: The contemporary approach to quality management is to assume that the traditional quality-cost relationship is a short-run perspective that understates the potential long-term loss of business from poor quality service.  In the long run, a higher level of quality will gain market share and increase business and thus is more cost effective. Further, as the company focuses on improving service quality, the cost of achieving good quality will be less because of innovations in processes and work design that will result.  This is the philosophy of “zero defects” which in waiting line analysis means “no waiting”. This level of better-quality, quicker service, will, in the long run increase business and be more profitable that the traditional view implies.

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

 

  1. How can psychology be used to improve waiting lines? Provide an example.

 

Ans: In some instances, it is not possible to reduce waiting times. When these situations occur, the problem of providing quality service often depends more on psychological solutions.  In other words, the organization will try to make waiting more palatable.  For example, providing distractions while customers wait to make the wait seem shorter, providing accurate estimates of wait times when a customer joins the queue, making it possible for waiting customers to view television, listen to music, look in a mirror, read magazines, or purchase snacks can all make waits seems shorter.  For especially long lines, line layout can make the wait seem shorter by keeping the line moving.  Thus, some amusement parks use lines that “snake” around in order to keep moving which gives the customer the impression that they are getting closer to the server (ride).

 

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Learning Objective: LO 5

 

  1. 78. The reservation center at an airline receives calls that follow a Poisson distribution with mean 5 calls per minute. The probability that no calls are received in a given one-minute period is __________%.
  2. a) 0.0034
  3. b) 0.0067
  4. c) 0.0135
  5. d) 0.6738

 

Ans: D, LO: 5, Bloom: K, Difficulty: Moderate, AACSB: Reflective thinking

 

 

  1. 79. The reservation center at an airline receives calls that follow a Poisson distribution with mean 5 calls per minute. The probability that at most 3 calls are received in a given one-minute period is __________%.
  2. a) 14.04
  3. b) 22.50
  4. c) 26.50
  5. d) 28.04

 

Ans: C, LO: 5, Bloom: K, Difficulty: Moderate, AACSB: Reflective thinking

 

 

  1. 80. The reservation center at an airline receives calls that follow a Poisson distribution with mean 5 calls per minute. The probability that at least 8 calls are received in a given one-minute period is __________%.
  2. a) 12.32
  3. b) 13.30
  4. c) 14.32
  5. d) 15.02

 

Ans: B, LO: 5, Bloom: K, Difficulty: Moderate, AACSB: Reflective thinking

 

 

  1. 81. The reservation center at an airline receives calls that follow a Poisson distribution with mean 5 calls per minute. The probability that at least 2 calls are received in a given two-minute period is __________%. (Note: you can assume that the number of calls received in two different minutes are independent.)
  2. a) 97.27
  3. b) 96.57
  4. c) 94.27
  5. d) 93.57

 

Ans: A, LO: 5, Bloom: K, Difficulty: Moderate, AACSB: Reflective thinking

 

 

  1. 82. Births in a hospital have a Poisson distribution with a mean of 1.8 births per hour. The probability of having exactly 4 births in a given hour is __________.
  2. a) 0.0523
  3. b) 0.0659
  4. c) 0.0723
  5. d) 0.0859

 

Ans: C , LO: 5, Bloom: K, Difficulty: Moderate, AACSB: Reflective thinking

 

 

  1. 83. Births in a hospital have a Poisson distribution with a mean of 1.8 births per hour. The probability of having at least 2 births in a given hour is __________.
  2. a) 0.537
  3. b) 0.507
  4. c) 0.487
  5. d) 0.447

 

Ans: A, LO: 5, Bloom: K, Difficulty: Moderate, AACSB: Reflective thinking

 

 

  1. 84. Births in hospital A have a Poisson distribution with a mean of 1.8 births per hour. Births of in hospital B have a Poisson distribution with a mean of 2.1 births per hour. The probability of having at exactly 7 births in total from both hospitals in a given hour is __________.
  2. a) 0.0682
  3. b) 0.0631
  4. c) 0.0592
  5. d) 0.0551

 

Ans: D, LO: 5, Bloom: K, Difficulty: Moderate, AACSB: Reflective thinking

 

 

  1. 85. Births in hospital A have a Poisson distribution with a mean of 1.8 births per hour. Births of in hospital B have a Poisson distribution with a mean of λ births per hour. What must be the value of λ so that the probability of having at exactly 7 births in total from both hospitals in a given hour is 0.1?
  2. a) 2.99
  3. b) 3.09
  4. c) 3.21
  5. d) 3.40

 

Ans: B, LO: 5, Bloom: K, Difficulty: Hard, AACSB: Reflective thinking

 

 

  1. 86. Births in hospital A have a Poisson distribution with a mean of λA births per hour. Births of in hospital B have a Poisson distribution with a mean of λB births per hour. What are possible values of λA and λB so that the probability of having at exactly 7 births in total from both hospitals in a given hour is 0.1486?
  2. a) λA = 1.8 and λB = 5.2
  3. b) λA = 2 and λB = 5.2
  4. c) λA = 1.8 and λB = 5
  5. d) λA = 2 and λB = 5

 

Ans: B, LO: 5, Bloom: K, Difficulty: Hard, AACSB: Reflective thinking

 

 

  1. 87. Births in hospital A have a Poisson distribution with a mean of λA = 2.3 births per hour. Births of in hospital B have a Poisson distribution with a mean of λB = 2.7 births per hour. If the probability of observing exactly n births in total from both hospitals in a given hour is 0.1755, then n = __________.
  2. a) 7
  3. b) 6
  4. c) 5
  5. d) 4

 

Ans: C, LO: 5, Bloom: K, Difficulty: Hard, AACSB: Reflective thinking

 

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