Criminal Investigation 11th Edition By Hess – Test Bank

$20.00

Pay And Download
Complete Test Bank With Answers
 
 
Sample Questions Posted Below

 

 

 

 

 

  1. When evidence is no longer needed, it is:
    1. typically auctioned
    2. destroyed under all
    3. always returned to the
    4. auctioned off, returned to the owner, or

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Evidence disposal can occur:
    1. at any
    2. after approval is

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. What type of evidence forms a substantive part of the case or has a legitimate and effective influence on the decision of the case?
    1. circumstantial
    2. material
    3. exculpatory
    4. in flagrante delicto

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Definitions

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. What type of evidence has been properly collected, identified, filed, and continuously secured?
    1. relevant
    2. competent
    3. material
    4. exculpatory

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Definitions

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. A way of folding paper so that evidence does not fall out is referred as a:
    1. druggist
    2. druggist
    3. dime
    4. doper

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. The types of prints taken of persons with reason to be at the crime scene location are referred to as:
    1. illusionary
    2. expectoratory
    3. elimination
    4. illuminating

 

ANSWER:                            c

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Integrity of evidence refers to the requirement that any item introduced in court must be in the same condition as when it was found at the crime This is documented by the chain of evidence, also referred to as the
    1. missing
    2. chain of
    3. chain of
    4. integrity of

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Crime Scene Integrity and Contamination of Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Ultraviolet light is good for finding:
    1. trace evidence such as semen or
    2. bullet
    3. paint or
    4. tire

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. The number one mistake officers make in processing fingerprints with powder is:
    1. overprocessing
    2. misidentifying
    3. sneezing and destroying the
    4. selecting the wrong

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.02 – Identify the common errors in collecting evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. When evidence is collected, an officer should record in his or her notes the:
    1. time the item was found and the
    2. time and date the item was
    3. time, date, and location the item was
    4. time, date, and location the item was found; the individual who found it; the case number; a description of the item; and who took it into

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.03 – Understand the criteria required to ensure admissibility of evidence in court.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. AFIS stands for:
    1. automated fingerprint issuing
    2. automatic fingerprint intake
    3. automatic fiber identification
    4. automated fingerprint identification

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.03 – Understand the criteria required to ensure admissibility of evidence in court.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Laboratory examination of ____ under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is still considered a reliable analysis method, although enhancements in technology have been
    1. gunshot residue (GSR)
    2. DNA
    3. fingerprints
    4. retinal scans

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.03 – Understand the criteria required to ensure admissibility of evidence in court.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. What evidence can indicate whether a person is running, lost, or carrying something heavy?
    1. fingerprints
    2. DNA
    3. shoeprints
    4. blood spatter

 

ANSWER:                            c

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. In the examination of objects of physical evidence, class characteristics are important because they can:
    1. place an item into a specific
    2. distinguish one item from
    3. be used to trace the item to its
    4. define how the object was used by an

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. The size and shape of chips and wear patterns in the blade of a screwdriver are
    1. individual
    2. group
    3. class
    4. unidentifiable

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. A genetic fingerprint is obtained from a suspect’s:
    1. eye

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. The most frequently located type of microscopic evidence is:
    1. skin
    2. saliva

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. DNA profiling can be done using:
    1. blood
    2. fingerprints
    3. skin or hair cells
    4. cells from almost any part of the

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Hair analysis can reveal all but which of the following?
    1. which part of the body the hair came from
    2. the presence of drugs or poisons and consumer chemicals
    3. age and gender
    4. whether it belongs to an animal or human

 

ANSWER:                            c

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Powders, Magnabrush techniques, laser technology, gelatin lifters, and cyanoacrylate are all used to process which type of evidence?
    1. petechiae
    2. adipocere
    3. fingerprints
    4. cadavers

 

ANSWER:                            c

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. DNA testing is expensive and takes a lot of Because of this, laboratories require that:
    1. samples be submitted for both the suspect and the
    2. sufficient material be
    3. the evidence be
    4. the evidence be properly

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Fingerprints indicate:

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Which term refers to the spiral pattern cut down the length of a firearm’s barrel?
    1. rifling
    2. bore
    3. lands
    4. caliber markings

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.06 – Describe special collection and processing considerations for the following types of evidence: shoe and tire prints and impressions, tools and tool marks, firearms and ammunition, glass, soils and minerals, safe insulation, ropes, strings, tapes, drugs, documents, laundry and dry-cleaning marks, paint, and skeletal remains.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. This type of fingerprint, which is not readily visible, consists of impressions of the ridges of the fingers, transferred to other surfaces by sweat on the ridges of the fingers or because the fingers carry residue of oil, blood, dirt, or another These prints are referred to as:
    1. ten-print
    2. latent
    3. ID-match
    4. comparison

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.06 – Describe special collection and processing considerations for the following types of evidence: shoe and tire prints and impressions, tools and tool marks, firearms and ammunition, glass, soils and minerals, safe insulation, ropes, strings, tapes, drugs, documents, laundry and dry-cleaning marks, paint, and skeletal remains.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Which technique is recommended for developing latent fingerprints on unpainted wood, paper, cardboard, or other absorbent surfaces?
    1. iodine fuming
    2. sakaguchi method
    3. powders
    4. thermal potassium

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.06 – Describe special collection and processing considerations for the following types of evidence: shoe and tire prints and impressions, tools and tool marks, firearms and ammunition, glass, soils and minerals, safe insulation, ropes, strings, tapes, drugs, documents, laundry and dry-cleaning marks, paint, and skeletal remains.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Evidence must be legally disposed of to prevent major storage
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. A mobile crime lab is usually a commercially customized office that provides compartments to hold equipment and countertops for processing
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Investigative Equipment

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Locard’s exchange principle states that a criminal always removes something from the crime scene or leaves behind incriminating
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Crime Scene Integrity and Contamination of Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Having equipment available for evidence processing is important, but having been trained in the use of the equipment is more
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Investigative Equipment

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. During the search of a crime scene, it is easy to tell which items are evidence; the primary difficulty is in collecting the
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Evidence may be placed in any type of container, as long as it does not touch other
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Probability serves no purpose in evidence; the lab must determine whether or not the evidence exactly matches the standard of
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.02 – Identify the common errors in collecting evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. To simplify testimony in court, it is practical to have one officer collect the item of evidence and another take
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.03 – Understand the criteria required to ensure admissibility of evidence in court.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Before, during, and after its examination, evidence must be securely protected and properly However, once it is ready for court, there are no issues regarding how it is stored.
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.03 – Understand the criteria required to ensure admissibility of evidence in court.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Automating evidence storage can prevent many
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.03 – Understand the criteria required to ensure admissibility of evidence in court.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Fingerprints are a type of evidence that requires a standard of
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Investigators should powder and lift every fingerprint they
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Investigators have used lip prints and lip impressions to solve
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Latent prints have been collected from human
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Different-colored fingerprint powder can be used when dusting for
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Deoxyribonucleic acid is an organic substance contained in a cell’s
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Hairs are far more distinguishable than
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. DNA is extremely durable and generally unaffected by heat, sunlight, moisture, bacteria, or
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Blood can be identified as animal or
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. Typewritten materials are not as traceable as handwritten
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.06 – Describe special collection and processing considerations for the following types of evidence: shoe and tire prints and impressions, tools and tool marks, firearms and ammunition, glass, soils and minerals, safe insulation, ropes, strings, tapes, drugs, documents, laundry and dry-cleaning marks, paint, and skeletal remains.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Understand

 

  1. The type of evidence that links a suspect with a crime and is often found in fingerprints, footprints, bloodstains, hairs, and fibers is called

ANSWER:                            associative

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Definitions

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The largest failure in gathering evidence is not the equipment available, but the lack of _____________ in using it

ANSWER:                            training

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Investigative Equipment

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. To determine what the evidence is, first consider the apparent

ANSWER:                            crime

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. A(n) _____________ of comparison is an object, measure, or model with which evidence is compared to determine whether both came from the same

ANSWER:                            standard

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. When collecting evidence, take extreme care to prevent different pieces of evidence from touching each other, which can lead to _____________

ANSWER:                            cross

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Crime Scene Integrity and Contamination of Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.02 – Identify the common errors in collecting evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The small lines on the palm side at the end of every human finger, which provide just enough roughness to help fingers retain objects, are known as _____________

ANSWER:                            friction

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. A tool _____________ is an impression left by a tool on a

ANSWER:                            mark

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Fingerprints are clear and _____________ evidence of a person’s

ANSWER:                            positive

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. For laboratories to process DNA evidence, the evidence must be _____________; that is, tending to prove guilt or

ANSWER:                            probative

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. In collecting hair samples, attempt to obtain 25 to 50 full hairs from the appropriate part of the suspect’s body for

_____________  purposes.

ANSWER:                            comparison

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Describe the basic types of equipment that a department would need to process a crime

ANSWER:                            Cameras and film; chalk and chalk line; compass; containers (boxes, bags of all sizes and shapes, lightweight plastic or paper; telescoping or collapsible glass bottles, and new paint containers); crayon or magic marker; envelopes, all sizes; fingerprint kit; first-aid kit; flashlight and batteries; knife; labels, all sizes; magnifier; measuring tape, steel; mirror with collapsible handle; money; notebook; paper; pencils, pens; picks; plaster; pliers; protractor; rope; ruler, carpenter-type; ruler, straightedge; scissors; screwdrivers, standard and Phillips; scribe; sketching supplies; spatula; string; tags; templates; tongue depressors, wooden; tubes, glass, with stoppers; tweezers; wrecking bar.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Investigative Equipment

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Explain the difference between competent, material, and relevant

ANSWER:                            Material evidence forms a substantive part of the case or has a legitimate and effective influence on the decision of the case. Relevant evidence applies to the matter in question. Competent evidence has been properly collected, identified, filed, and continuously secured.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Definitions

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. When would an investigator make use of an ultraviolet light?

ANSWER:                            An investigator should use an ultraviolet (UV) light for some kinds of hard-to-see

evidence—small amounts of semen, for instance, or fibers.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.01 – Explain the requisite steps involved in processing physical evidence correctly, from its discovery to final disposition.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Once evidence is discovered, photographed, and sketched, it is ready for How could you collect several different items in order to best avoid cross-contamination?

ANSWER:                            Make sure items of evidence do not touch one another. When using the same tool for several tasks, thoroughly clean the tool after each use to prevent cross-contamination.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Crime Scene Integrity and Contamination of Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.02 – Identify the common errors in collecting evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. How should an investigator avoid contaminating evidence?

ANSWER:                            To minimize contamination of a crime scene and the evidence within, cordon off the area and keep all unnecessary people, including police officers, outside the scene perimeter.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Crime Scene Integrity and Contamination of Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.02 – Identify the common errors in collecting evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Why did the jury seem to disregard the DNA evidence in the J. Simpson case, and what suggestions do you have for avoiding such problems?

ANSWER:                            The defense raised questions about how blood samples were collected, preserved, and examined. To avoid such problems, use disposable instruments or clean them  thoroughly before and after handling each sample; avoid talking, sneezing, and coughing over evidence; air-dry evidence thoroughly before packaging; and put evidence into new paper bags or envelopes, not into plastic bags, and never use staples.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.03 – Understand the criteria required to ensure admissibility of evidence in court.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. How is it possible to collect scent from a crime scene?

ANSWER:                            An article of clothing can be used as a scent article, or scent evidence can be collected by placing a sterile gauze pad on an item of evidence. A Scent Transfer Unit uses a vacuum system to trap scent on the gauze. If no scent article is available, the Scent Transfer Unit can be put in a closed room to vacuum the air for five minutes to try to capture a scent. These scent pads can be presented to a tracking dog or placed in a freezer for preservation.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Discuss the difference between individual and class

ANSWER:                            Class characteristics are the features that place an item into a specific category. For example, the size and shape of a tool mark may indicate that the tool used was a screwdriver rather than a pry bar. Individual characteristics are the features that distinguish one item from another of the same type. For example, chips and wear patterns in the blade of a screwdriver may leave marks that are distinguishable from those of any other screwdriver.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Describe the three different types of fingerprints and explain the process of identifying and preserving each

ANSWER:                            Latent fingerprints are impressions transferred to a surface, either by sweat on the ridges of the fingers or because the fingers carry residue of oil, dirt, blood, or other substances. Latent prints are not readily seen but can be developed through powders or chemicals. They are normally left on nonporous surfaces.

 

Visible fingerprints are made when fingers are dirty or stained. They occur primarily on glossy or light-colored surfaces and can be dusted and lifted.

 

Plastic fingerprints, one form of visible print, are impressions left in soft substances such as putty, grease, tar, butter, or soft soap. These prints are photographed, not dusted.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Discuss how language analysis can contribute to an

ANSWER:                            An individual’s communication, whether written or spoken, may provide clues about his or her gender, age, race or ethnicity, or what part of the country (or world) the person grew up in or has spent recent time in. Language analysis may also provide insight into a person’s educational level, political views, and religious orientation, which may in turn provide further evidence regarding a criminal motive.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.04 – List the types of evidence most commonly found in criminal investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. List and describe the evidence that would be most helpful in showing that a specific person was at a

ANSWER:                            Probabilities play a large role in determining the value of evidence. Fingerprints and DNA, for example, provide positive identification. In contrast, blood type does not provide positive identification, but it can help eliminate a person as a suspect. An object’s individuality is also important. For example, a heel mark’s value is directly proportional to the number of its specific features, such as brand name, number of nails, and individual wear patterns that can be identified. Some objects have identification marks on them. Other evidence requires a comparison to be of value—a tire impression matching a tire, a bullet matching a specific revolver, a torn piece of clothing matching a shirt.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Processing Evidence: Maintaining the Chain of Custody from Discovery to Disposal

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Why is the quality of a rolled fingerprint important?

ANSWER:                            Smudges and distortions reduce the print’s usefulness, so quality is extremely important.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.05 – Compare and contrast the determinations that can and cannot be made from fingerprint, DNA, blood, and hair evidence.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. What can the examination of human skeletal remains contribute to an investigation?

ANSWER:                            If adequate human skeletal remains are available, the sex, race, approximate age at death, approximate height, and approximate time since death can be determined.

Dental comparisons and X-rays of old fractures are other important identifying features or individual characteristics.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.06 – Describe special collection and processing considerations for the following types of evidence: shoe and tire prints and impressions, tools and tool marks, firearms and ammunition, glass, soils and minerals, safe insulation, ropes, strings, tapes, drugs, documents, laundry and dry-cleaning marks, paint, and skeletal remains.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Describe the type of evidence that might be found at the scene of a hit-and-run. How should this evidence be collected?

ANSWER:                            In hit-and-run cases, collect paint samples from any area of the vehicle that had contact with the victim. Take paint samples down to the original metal to show the layer composition. Use small boxes for submitting paint samples to the crime lab, putting samples from different parts of the vehicle in separate small boxes. If paint chips are on the clothing of the victim or suspect, send the entire article of clothing in a paper bag to the laboratory, properly labeled and identified.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Frequently Examined Evidence

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.05.06 – Describe special collection and processing considerations for the following types of evidence: shoe and tire prints and impressions, tools and tool marks, firearms and ammunition, glass, soils and minerals, safe insulation, ropes, strings, tapes, drugs, documents, laundry and dry-cleaning marks, paint, and skeletal remains.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

 

 

  1. Arson is a:
    1. Part One Index
    2. Part Two Index
    3. Part Three Index

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Introduction

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.01 – Define the various classifications of fires.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Fires are classified as all EXCEPT which of the following?
    1. natural
    2. incendiary
    3. of unknown origin
    4. technological

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Classification of Fires

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.01 – Define the various classifications of fires.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Female arsonists usually burn:
    1. the property of
    2. the property of someone known to
    3. their own
    4. another female’s

 

ANSWER:                            c

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Classification of Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.03 – Explain how the Model Arson Law classifies arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. If a person dies in a fire set by an arsonist, the death is:
    1. involuntary
    2. voluntary
    3. second-degree
    4. first-degree

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Classification of Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.03 – Explain how the Model Arson Law classifies arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Preparing to burn a building without actually doing so is ____
    1. aggravated
    2. second-degree
    3. simple
    4. attempted

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Elements of the Crime: Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.04 – Identify the criminal elements commonly included in arson statutes.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Private insurance investigators:
    1. interfere with fire investigations and should be kept
    2. are supportive but not
    3. can assist fire and police efforts in investigating fire
    4. can offer bounties on

 

ANSWER:                            c

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Police and Fire Department Cooperation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.05 – Explain how the fire department and police department cooperate in handling arson cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Which of the following agencies or groups is among the common partners in an arson investigation?
    1. civilians
    2. NCJ
    3. AIT
    4. insurance companies

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Other Sources of Assistance in Investigating Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.05 – Explain how the fire department and police department cooperate in handling arson cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Which is one of the fire department’s basic roles?
    1. fire investigation
    2. identifying the arsonist
    3. arson investigation
    4. arson prosecution

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Police and Fire Department Cooperation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.05 – Explain how the fire department and police department cooperate in handling arson cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The purpose of the law enforcement officer in an arson investigation is to:
    1. support the fire officer with the
    2. provide protection to the fire
    3. assist with the criminal
    4. work cooperatively to handle the criminal

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Police and Fire Department Cooperation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.05 – Explain how the fire department and police department cooperate in handling arson cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The fire triangle consists of which of the following three elements?
    1. oxygen, fire, and heat
    2. fuel, heat, and ignition
    3. wood, warmth, and fire
    4. air, fuel, and heat

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.06 – Explain what the fire triangle is and why it is important in arson investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Which of the following statements is true?
    1. More than one point of origin indicates
    2. Fires normally burn
    3. The point of origin is established by finding the area with the lowest
    4. Fires are drawn toward ventilation but do not follow fuel

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.07 ­ Identify the factors to consider when determining a fire’s point

of origin.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Crazing is:
    1. the checking of charred
    2. irregular cracks in glass from
    3. how deeply the wood is
    4. burnt

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.07 ­ Identify the factors to consider when determining a fire’s point

of origin.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Catalytic combustion detectors are:
    1. the most common type of flammable vapor detector used by arson
    2. recently developed instruments for detecting the presence of an explosive
    3. a remote-controlled instrument for approaching and analyzing unknown explosive
    4. a device that can be repurposed by technologically-sophisticated arsonists to start

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.07 ­ Identify the factors to consider when determining a fire’s point

of origin.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. A path of flammable liquid in which a fire will follow is known as a:
    1. point of

 

ANSWER:                            c

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.08 – Describe the various indicators of arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The appearance of alligatoring at a fire scene:
    1. has no investigative
    2. is the formation of irregular cracks in glass due to
    3. is the charring of just the surface of
    4. is a sure sign of

 

ANSWER:                            a

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.08 – Describe the various indicators of arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The rainbow effect results from which of the following?
    1. alcohol
    2. vegetable compounds
    3. sulfur or nitric acid
    4. oil and gasoline

 

ANSWER:                            d

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.08 – Describe the various indicators of arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The majority of automobile fires are:
    1. of undetermined

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Investigating Vehicle Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.10 – Identify the key factors to consider when investigating suspected arson of a vehicle.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. If a bomb is found, the most important rule in handling the suspect package is:
    1. to get the package submerged in water as quickly as
    2. to wear bomb-proof gloves when removing the package from the
    3. not to touch the
    4. to have at least three officers surround the

 

ANSWER:                            c

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Responding to a Bomb Threat

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.11 – Identify what investigators should pay special attention to when working explosion and bombing cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. What resource has become increasingly useful in bomb detection and in searches for evidence following explosions and has been in constant demand since 9/11?
    1. field deployable electronic sensors
    2. K-9s
    3. electronic “sniffers”
    4. robots

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.11 – Identify what investigators should pay special attention to when working explosion and bombing cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Which of the following is one of the five classes of explosive incidents in the United States?
    1. fireworks accidents
    2. emotionally disturbed persons
    3. revenge
    4. residential explosives

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Bomb Scene Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.11 – Identify what investigators should pay special attention to when working explosion and bombing cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. A disrupter is:
    1. another term used to describe an
    2. someone who accidentally disturbs the scene of an arson
    3. a device that fires a jet of water into an explosive to make it
    4. a common type of igniter used to start

 

ANSWER:                            c

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Responding to a Bomb Threat

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.11 – Identify what investigators should pay special attention to when working explosion and bombing cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Which of the following is part of the initial procedure that officers should take when responding to an explosion?
    1. Ensure that a search for perpetrator has been
    2. Establish procedures to document personnel entering and exiting the
    3. Ensure that the scene has been
    4. Ensure that a search warrant has been procured in order to search the

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Bomb Scene Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.11 – Identify what investigators should pay special attention to when working explosion and bombing cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. A sniffer is a detection device that:
    1. uses air temperature and the presence of off-gassing to determine whether a scene is safe to
    2. takes a sample of air and identifies the approximate quantities of explosive material in the
    3. takes a sample of air and identifies the quality of the smoke and what type of igniter was used to set the
    4. uses gun powder to fire a jet of water or a projectile at a particular component of an explosive to make it

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Responding to a Bomb Threat

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.11 – Identify what investigators should pay special attention to when working explosion and bombing cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Pipe bombs, nail bombs, and other bombs disguised to escape detection are referred to as:
    1. local explosive devices (LEDs).
    2. disguised explosive devices (DEDs).
    3. improvised explosive devices (IEDs).
    4. dangerous explosive devices (DEDs).

 

ANSWER:                            c

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Bombings and Explosions

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.11 – Identify what investigators should pay special attention to when working explosion and bombing cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The homemade explosive that Richard Reid, the “shoe bomber,” carried aboard American Airlines Flight 63 from Paris to Miami in 2001 was made from:
    1. triacetone triperoxide (TATP).
    2. C-4 military
    3. 2-methyloctane.

 

ANSWER:                            b

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Bombings and Explosions

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.11 – Identify what investigators should pay special attention to when working explosion and bombing cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. A fire caused by faulty wiring is classified as a natural
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Classification of Fires

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.01 – Define the various classifications of fires.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Arson is only a crime against
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Classification of Fires

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.01 – Define the various classifications of fires.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The basic difference between aggravated and simple arson is that aggravated arson involves malicious
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Classification of Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.03 – Explain how the Model Arson Law classifies arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Strikers start fires because of an irresistible urge or passion for
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Arsonist

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.04 – Identify the criminal elements commonly included in arson statutes.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Among children, fireplay almost always involves malice and the intent to
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Arsonist

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.04 – Identify the criminal elements commonly included in arson statutes.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Male arsonists usually burn their own property rather than that of
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Arsonist

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.04 – Identify the criminal elements commonly included in arson statutes.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Juveniles have a higher rate of involvement in arson crimes than any other Index
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Arsonist

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.04 – Identify the criminal elements commonly included in arson statutes.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. It is easy to determine whether the victim is a suspect in arson
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Special Challenges in Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.05 – Explain how the fire department and police department cooperate in handling arson cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Arson investigations are usually joint investigations involving both law enforcement and fire
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Police and Fire Department Cooperation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.05 – Explain how the fire department and police department cooperate in handling arson cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The ATF is responsible for alcohol, tobacco, firearms, and explosive
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Other Sources of Assistance in Investigating Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.05 – Explain how the fire department and police department cooperate in handling arson cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Fire marshals have extralegal powers to summon witnesses, subpoena records, and take statements under oath that police officers do not
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Police and Fire Department Cooperation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.05 – Explain how the fire department and police department cooperate in handling arson cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Arson has the highest clearance rate by arrest of all Index
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Other Sources of Assistance in Investigating Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.05 – Explain how the fire department and police department cooperate in handling arson cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Evidence of accelerants is a primary form of physical evidence at an arson
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.06 – Explain what the fire triangle is and why it is important in arson investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The most commonly used flammable liquid igniter is
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.06 – Explain what the fire triangle is and why it is important in arson investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Matches, candles, lighters, or chemical devices can all be used as
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.06 – Explain what the fire triangle is and why it is important in arson investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Arson fires usually show the same burn patterns as regular
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.07 ­ Identify the factors to consider when determining a fire’s point

of origin.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Knowing the fire’s point of origin is of the utmost importance to an arson
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.07 ­ Identify the factors to consider when determining a fire’s point

of origin.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. A rapid, intensely hot fire results in small, flat
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.07 ­ Identify the factors to consider when determining a fire’s point

of origin.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The presence of large shiny blisters (alligator char) occurs when a fire spreads rapidly or burns with great intensity and is evidence that a liquid accelerant was present during the
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            False

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.07 ­ Identify the factors to consider when determining a fire’s point

of origin.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The National Counterterrorism Center has developed detailed bomb threat instructions to be kept near telephones where such a threat might be
    1. True
    2. False

 

ANSWER:                            True

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Responding to a Bomb Threat

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.11 – Identify what investigators should pay special attention to when working explosion and bombing cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. A fire in which there is no evidence to indicate whether the fire was natural, accidental, or incendiary is classified as a fire of

ANSWER:                            undetermined origin

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Classification of Fires

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.01 – Define the various classifications of fires.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Burning of buildings other than dwellings is arson under the Model Arson

ANSWER:                            second-degree

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Classification of Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.03 – Explain how the Model Arson Law classifies arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The burning of one’s own property is almost always to .

 

 

ANSWER:                            defraud

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Elements of the Crime: Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.04 – Identify the criminal elements commonly included in arson statutes.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

  1. In arson cases, _______________ is the prime element in the corpus delicti. ANSWER: burning

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Elements of the Crime: Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.04 – Identify the criminal elements commonly included in arson statutes.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. _______________ cocktails are a type of explosive

ANSWER:                            Molotov

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Elements of the Crime: Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.04 – Identify the criminal elements commonly included in arson statutes.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. When responding to a fire scene, what should an officer observe, note, and record?

ANSWER:                            While approaching a fire scene, first responders should observe, mentally note and,when time permits, record in notes:

 

the presence, location, and conditions of victims and witnesses

vehicles leaving the scene, bystanders or unusual activities near the scene flame and smoke conditions (e.g., the volume of flames and smoke; the color, height, and location of flames; the direction in which the flames and smoke are moving)

the type of occupancy, use, and condition of the structure conditions surrounding the scene

weather conditions

fire-suppression techniques used, including ventilation, forcible entry, and utility shutoff measures

status of fire alarms, security alarms, and sprinklers

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Responding to the Scene

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.05 – Explain how the fire department and police department cooperate in handling arson cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Describe three special challenges to arson

ANSWER:                            Special challenges in investigating arson include:

 

coordinating efforts with the fire department and others determining whether a crime has been committed

finding physical evidence, most of which is destroyed by the fire finding witnesses

determining whether the victim is a suspect

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Special Challenges in Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.05 – Explain how the fire department and police department cooperate in handling arson cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. The most common and accurate types of flammable vapor detectors used by arson investigators are

_______________ combustion detectors.

ANSWER:                            catalytic

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.06 – Explain what the fire triangle is and why it is important in arson investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. The breaking off of surface pieces of concrete or brick due to intense heat is referred to as .

ANSWER:                            spalling

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.06 – Explain what the fire triangle is and why it is important in arson investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Accelerants at the scene can be identified by olfactory detection, or sense of .

ANSWER:                            smell

 

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.06 – Explain what the fire triangle is and why it is important in arson investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. When limited air for combustion is available, in a fireplace or stove may be only partially burned, and may, when examined, provide a motive for

ANSWER:                            paper

documents

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.08 – Describe the various indicators of arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. A(n) warrant is issued when it is necessary for a government agent to search a property to determine a fire’s cause and

ANSWER:                            administrative

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Search Warrants and Fire Investigations

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.09 – Explain the different types of warrants that may be involved in a fire investigation and when they are issued.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Remember

 

  1. Summarize the Model Arson

ANSWER:

The Model Arson Law was written and promoted in the 1920s by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). Many states do not classify fires as aggravated or simple but instead have adopted the Model Arson Law, which specifies four degrees of arson. The Model Arson Law divides arson into the following degrees:

 

First-degree: burning of dwellings

Second-degree: burning of buildings other than dwellings

Third-degree: burning of other property

Fourth-degree: attempting to burn buildings or property

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Classification of Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.03 – Explain how the Model Arson Law classifies arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Outline the elements of the crime of

ANSWER:                            As in other crimes, arson laws vary from state to state but share some common elements.

The elements of the crime of arson include: (1) willful, malicious burning of a building  or property (2) of another or of one’s own to defraud (3) or causing to be burned (4) or aiding, counseling, or procuring such burning. Attempted arson is also a crime in most states.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Elements of the Crime: Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.04 – Identify the criminal elements commonly included in arson statutes.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. What is a striker?

ANSWER:                            In some cases, firefighters have set fires and then responded to the alarm, receiving attention and praise at having “played the hero.” These “vanity” arsonists are called strikers.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Arsonist

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.04 – Identify the criminal elements commonly included in arson statutes.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. List the common motives for arson and explain how they help investigators locate

 

 

ANSWER:                            Common motives include revenge, spite, or jealousy; vandalism and malicious mischief; crime concealment and diversionary tactics; profit and insurance fraud; intimidation, extortion, and sabotage; and psychiatric afflictions, pyromania, alcoholism, and mental retardation.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Arsonist

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.04 – Identify the criminal elements commonly included in arson statutes.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Describe the difference between accelerants and igniters, and give three examples of

ANSWER:                            Accelerants are substances that promote combustion. Evidence of accelerants is a primary form of physical evidence at an arson scene. Most arson cases involve a flammable liquid such as gasoline, kerosene, charcoal lighter, paint thinner, lacquer solvent, acetone, and isopropyl alcohol.

 

Igniters are substances or devices used to start fires. The most common igniters are matches. Other common igniters include candles; cigars; cigarettes; cigarette lighters; electrical, mechanical, and chemical devices; and explosives.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.06 – Explain what the fire triangle is and why it is important in arson investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Explain the concept of the fire

ANSWER:                            The fire triangle is a basic concept critical to an arson investigation. The fire triangle consists of three elements necessary for a substance to burn: air, fuel, and heat. In arson, one or more of these elements is usually present in abnormal amounts for the structure.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.06 – Explain what the fire triangle is and why it is important in arson investigations.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Describe how to find the point of origin in a fire and what it can reveal to the

ANSWER:                            The point of origin is established by finding the area with the deepest char, alligatoring, and usually the greatest destruction.

 

Determination of the origin of a fire involves the combined interpretation of information derived from one or more of the following: (1) witness statements, (2) fire and burn patterns, (3) arc mapping, and (4) fire dynamics (the physics and chemistry of the fire) (NFPA 18.1.1). Multiple points of origin might indicate arson.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.07 ­ Identify the factors to consider when determining a fire’s point

of origin.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Why would an investigator use a K-9 in an arson investigation?

ANSWER:                            Dogs can be of great assistance in arson investigation. A lab-certified

accelerant-detection canine can detect accelerants at fire scenes and can also search a crowd for possible suspects, search a suspect’s clothing and vehicle for the presence  of accelerants, and search areas for accelerant containers.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.08 – Describe the various indicators of arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Why is it important to photograph and videotape an arson fire?

ANSWER:                            Pictures of a fire in progress show the smoke’s color and its origination as well as the size of the fire at different points and times. Pictures are especially useful if there appears to be acceleration of the fire at a specific time that would indicate arson or the presence of highly combustible substances. Many fire departments take such in- progress photographs.

 

Smaller departments may seek help from television or newspaper photographers who may take pictures that can be of immense help.

 

Photographs or videotapes of the fire scene are also ideal to show the judge and jury.

 

Pictures taken of people at the fire scene might reveal the presence of a known arsonist or show a person who repeatedly appears in photos taken at fires and is therefore an arson suspect. Also, people familiar with the structure can review the pictures for anything out of the ordinary. Photos and videos taken inside to show the extent of burning will prove the corpus delicti. Officers can take close-up videos of extra papers, rags, gas cans, or other suspicious substances, as well as examples of alligatoring and deep charring. By videotaping at each stage of the search, officers can show the point of origin, the nature of the burning, and the direction and speed of the fire’s spread.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.08 – Describe the various indicators of arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Why would an arson investigator interview a firefighter as part of the arson investigation?

ANSWER:                            Since the firefighter was initially on scene, the investigator could reasonably ask questions such as: How was the fire discovered? Who discovered it? Who were witnesses? What did they see? What color was the smoke, and where was it coming from? What direction was the wind? Did the fire appear to suddenly accelerate? Did anything out of the ordinary occur before the fire? Were there unusual odors? Were the shades up or down? Did obstructions prevent seeing into the building? Were suspicious persons or vehicles observed at the scene before, during, or after the fire? In addition, the investigator may suspect the firefighter of being a “vanity” arsonist or “striker,” or one who starts fires even though he or she may be in the public safety field or may be aspiring to be hired as a police officer or firefighter.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.08 – Describe the various indicators of arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. When investigating a case of arson, how does an officer uncover the burning pattern?

ANSWER:                            Fires normally burn upward, not outward. They are drawn toward ventilation and follow fuel paths. If the arsonist places a path of flammable liquid, the fire will follow that path, known as a trailer. Trailers can be made of paper, hay, flammable compounds, or any substance that burns readily, and they result in an abnormal pattern. The char marks will follow the trailer’s path.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   The Preliminary Investigation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.08 – Describe the various indicators of arson.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Describe the two-step warrant process that is required by the S. Supreme Court for investigating fires involving crimes.

ANSWER:                            The U.S. Supreme Court requires a two-step warrant process for investigating fires involving crimes. The initial search may require an administrative warrant for searching the premises for cause of fire and origin determination anda criminal warrant when evidence of a crime is discovered. Both require probable cause for issuance. An administrative warrant is issued when it is necessary for a government agent to search the premises to determine the fire’s cause and origin. A criminal warrant is issued on probable cause when the premises yield evidence of a crime.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Search Warrants and Fire Investigations

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.09 – Explain the different types of warrants that may be involved in a fire investigation and when they are issued.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. How should an officer investigate a vehicle fire?

ANSWER:                            Although vehicle fires can be caused by accident, vehicles usually do not burn readily. Accelerants are used on many vehicles to accomplish arson. A quart to a half-gallon of flammable liquid is required to cause a major vehicle fire. When investigating vehicle fires, officers should look for evidence of accelerants and determine whether the vehicle was insured. It is seldom arson if there was no insurance.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Investigating Vehicle Arson

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.10 – Identify the key factors to consider when investigating suspected arson of a vehicle.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

 

  1. Describe some of the recent technological innovations in bomb

ANSWER:                            Often, additional tools are needed to help responding officers determine if an explosive threat truly exists. Some of the methods are low-tech, such as using dogs to sniff out compounds used to build bombs. Dogs have become increasingly useful in bomb detection and in searches for evidence following explosions.

 

Other techniques employ highly advanced equipment and technology to detect explosive material. Sometimes law enforcement relies on what is referred to as “sniffer” technology—the use of a portable device that pulls in an air sample and passes it through a chemical analyzer to calculate a profile of the elements and compounds, including explosives that are present in the ambient environment. Bomb squads in larger departments are using robots to approach and detonate suspected packages. Robots can be equipped with disrupters, devices that use gunpowder to fire a jet of water or a projectile at a particular component of an explosive to make it safe.

POINTS:                             1

REFERENCES:                   Responding to a Bomb Threat

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  CRIM.HESS.17.16.11 – Identify what investigators should pay special attention to when working explosion and bombing cases.

KEYWORDS:                       Bloom’s: Apply

There are no reviews yet.

Add a review

Be the first to review “Criminal Investigation 11th Edition By Hess – Test Bank”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Category:
Updating…
  • No products in the cart.