Cognitive Neuroscience The Biology of The Mind 4th Edition By Mangun – Ivry – Test Bank

$20.00

Pay And Download

 

Complete Test Bank With Answers

 

 

 

Sample Questions Posted Below

 

 

a. the olfactory cortex has direct connectivity to the limbic cortex.
b. the olfactory cortex has direct connectivity to area MT.
c. people with damage to the basal ganglia have compromised odor recognition.
d. people with damage to the cerebellum have compromised odor recognition.
ANS: A DIF: Difficult REF: Olfaction OBJ: LO 2
MSC: Understanding
16. The basic taste umami is experienced when eating foods rich in
a. fat. c. carbohydrates.
b. protein. d. minerals.
ANS: B DIF: Easy REF: Gustation OBJ: LO 3
MSC: Remembering
17. Which of the following is NOT one of the basic tastes?
a. Acid c. Sweet
b. Bitter d. Umami
ANS: A DIF: Easy REF: Gustation OBJ: LO 3
MSC: Remembering
18. The primary gustatory cortex is located in the
a. thalamus and hypothalamus. c. pons and medulla.
b. hippocampus and amygdala. d. insula and operculum.
ANS: D DIF: Easy REF: Gustation OBJ: LO 3
MSC: Remembering
19. The orbitofrontal cortex is an integration area for which two senses?
a. somatosensation and vision c. olfaction and gustation
b. vision and audition d. somatosensation and proprioception
ANS: C DIF: Easy REF: Gustation OBJ: LO 3
MSC: Remembering
20. In which of the following brain areas might you expect an expert taster such as a chef or sommelier to
have unique patterns of neural connectivity?
a. the superior temporal gyrus c. the orbitofrontal cortex
b. area MT d. the basal ganglia
ANS: C DIF: Medium REF: Gustation OBJ: LO 3
MSC: Applying
21. Which of the following is NOT a type of corpuscle used for somatosensation?
a. Merkel c. Meissner
b. Calvert d. Pacinian
ANS: B DIF: Easy REF: Somatosensation
OBJ: LO 4 MSC: Remembering
22. Information about the left hand is processed
a. in the left hemisphere for both the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices.
b. in the right hemisphere for both the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices.
c. in the left hemisphere for the primary somatosensory cortex and bilaterally for the
secondary somatosensory cortex.

d. in the right hemisphere for the primary somatosensory cortex and bilaterally for the
secondary somatosensory cortex.
ANS: D DIF: Medium REF: Somatosensation
OBJ: LO 4 MSC: Understanding
23. Which area of the body has the greatest amount of representation in the human primary somatosensory
cortex?
a. hands c. gums
b. feet d. trunk
ANS: A DIF: Medium REF: Somatosensation
OBJ: LO 4 MSC: Understanding
24. The primary visual pathway is best described as
a. retina optic nerve hypothalamus superior colliculus occipital lobe.
b. retina cochlea optic chiasm thalamus occipital lobe.
c. retina optic nerve optic chiasm thalamus occipital lobe.
d. retina hippocampus thalamus superior colliculus occipital lobe.
ANS: C DIF: Medium REF: Vision OBJ: LO 5
MSC: Understanding
25. Due to a defect in one type of photoreceptor, Susan has poor vision at night, when light levels are
relatively low. Which type of photoreceptor is defective?
a. ganglion cell c. rod
b. cone d. cornea
ANS: C DIF: Easy REF: Vision OBJ: LO 5
MSC: Applying
26. The highest density of ________, or colorsensitive photoreceptors, can be found in the ________ of
the retina.
a. cones ; fovea c. rods ; fovea
b. cones ; periphery d. rods ; periphery
ANS: A DIF: Medium REF: Vision OBJ: LO 5
MSC: Understanding
27. Before entering the brain, each optic nerve splits into two branches so that information from the
________ half of each retina crosses to the opposite side of the brain.
a. nasal (medial) c. left (dorsal)
b. temporal (lateral) d. right (ventral)
ANS: A DIF: Medium REF: Vision OBJ: LO 5
MSC: Understanding
28. A patient has an injury to the optic nerves, such that the branches of each optic nerve that normally
cross to the opposite side of the brain at the optic chiasm are severed. The remaining branches, which
do not cross to the other side of the brain, are intact. Which of the following best describes the effect
of this injury on his vision?
a. He can now see only by using his right eye; his left eye is functionally blind.
b. Only information from the left visual field can enter his brain for processing.
c. Only the signal for half the visual field of each eye is processed by the brain.
d. His brain now receives visual information only from the medial half of each retina.

ANS: C DIF: Difficult REF: Vision OBJ: LO 5
MSC: Applying
29. Simple cells in the primary visual cortex selectively respond to visual stimuli based on
a. direction of stimulus motion. c. stimulus orientation.
b. stimulus color. d. distance of the stimulus from the viewer.
ANS: C DIF: Medium REF: Vision OBJ: LO 5 | LO 6
MSC: Remembering
30. If you were to conduct a singlecell recording from a neuron in the MT region of the extrastriate visual
cortex, you would probably find that the cell fires most vigorously to a
a. bar of light that alternates in color between red and green.
b. bar of light tilted at a 15° angle in the center of the cell’s receptive field.
c. cornershaped region of light on a dark background.
d. bar of light that moves across the cell’s receptive field.
ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: Vision OBJ: LO 6 | LO 7
MSC: Applying
31. Achromatopsia is due to
a. the absence of the photopigment sensitive to long wavelengths.
b. the absence of the photopigment sensitive to short wavelengths.
c. cortical lesions in area V4.
d. cortical lesions in area MT.
ANS: C DIF: Medium REF: Deficits in Visual Perception
OBJ: LO 7 | LO 9 MSC: Remembering
32. A selective loss of motion perception is called
a. achromatopsia. c. akinetopsia.
b. anomia. d. agnosia.
ANS: C DIF: Easy REF: Deficits in Visual Perception
OBJ: LO 9 MSC: Remembering
33. A patient who has a focal brain injury to the human analog of area MT would demonstrate all of the
following for visually presented stimuli EXCEPT
a. accurate shape discrimination. c. accurate hue discrimination.
b. accurate velocity discrimination. d. accurate object recognition.
ANS: B DIF: Medium REF: Deficits in Visual Perception
OBJ: LO 7 | LO 9 MSC: Understanding
34. Using singlecell recording, you isolate a neuron in area MT that selectively responds to moving
stimuli. What other response property would you expect from this cell?
a. It is selective for stimulus color. c. It is selective for stimulus hue.
b. It is selective for stimulus shape. d. It is selective for stimulus velocity.
ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: Vision OBJ: LO 7
MSC: Understanding
35. Injury to all of the following brain areas EXCEPT ________ will result in a scotoma.
a. MT c. LGN (lateral geniculate nucleus)
b. V1 d. Brodmann area 17

ANS: A DIF: Difficult REF: Deficits in Visual Perception
OBJ: LO 5 | LO 6 | LO 9 MSC: Applying
36. A scotoma that involves one entire side of the visual field is called a
a. topographic map. c. receptive field.
b. homunculus. d. hemianopia.
ANS: D DIF: Easy REF: Deficits in Visual Perception
OBJ: LO 6 | LO 9 MSC: Remembering
37. A patient with progressive supranuclear palsy is suffering from gradual deterioration of his superior
colliculus. Which of the following statements best describes the result of this disease?
a. The patient has intact acuity and shape perception, but he can no longer recognize visual
objects.
b. The patient demonstrates the phenomenon of blindsight.
c. The patient is cortically blind.
d. The patient is unable to initiate eye movements.
ANS: D DIF: Medium REF: Deficits in Visual Perception
OBJ: LO 7 | LO 9 MSC: Applying
38. The finding that V1, but not V2 or V3, has an fMRI “fingerprint” for a presented but not perceived
orientation suggests that
a. higher visual areas track awareness.
b. lower visual areas track awareness.
c. higher visual areas track sensation but not necessarily perception.
d. lower visual areas track neither sensation nor perception.
ANS: A DIF: Medium REF: From Sensation to Perception
OBJ: LO 8 MSC: Applying
39. How are differences in individuals’ perception of the Ebbinghaus illusion reflected in brain anatomy?
a. A larger illusion is found in people with a larger V1.
b. A smaller illusion is found in people with a larger V1.
c. A larger illusion is found in people with a larger V2/V3.
d. A smaller illusion is found in people with a larger V2/V3.
ANS: B DIF: Medium REF: From Sensation to Perception
OBJ: LO 8 MSC: Understanding
40. Why is it difficult to investigate the conscious experience of perception using monkeys?
a. Monkeys do not have conscious experiences.
b. We cannot infer a conscious experience from monkeys’ behavior.
c. Human visual regions do not correspond perfectly to monkey visual regions.
d. Visual illusions do not affect nonhuman animals.
ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: From Sensation to Perception
OBJ: LO 8 MSC: Understanding
41. Which subcortical region is known to maintain multimodal maps of the environment and is involved in
the control and orienting of movements?
a. the pons c. the medulla
b. the cerebellum d. the superior colliculus
ANS: D DIF: Medium
REF: Multimodal Perception: I See What You’re Sayin’ OBJ: LO 10

MSC: Remembering
42. Which term is used to describe an idiosyncratic union between or within sensory modalities, such as
experiencing the color red whenever seeing the letter A?
a. achromatopsia c. synesthesia
b. akinetopsia d. agnosia
ANS: C DIF: Easy
REF: Multimodal Perception: I See What You’re Sayin’ OBJ: LO 11
MSC: Remembering
43. Which of the following results would be expected for an individual experiencing the most common
form of synesthesia?
a. Their visual cortices have been shown to be sensitive to tactile discrimination.
b. They show interference effects when asked to identify the colors of letters if the colors are
inconsistent with their synesthetic experiences.
c. Their somatosensory cortices have been shown to be sensitive to visual information.
d. They show interference effects when asked to identify sung letters if the pitches are
inconsistent with their synesthetic experiences.
ANS: B DIF: Medium
REF: Multimodal Perception: I See What You’re Sayin’ OBJ: LO 11
MSC: Understanding
44. Which of the following is the best example of cortical plasticity?
a. the processing of tactile information by blind people in cortical regions that process visual
information in sighted people
b. the ability of the barn owl to localize objects in space based on auditory and not visual
information
c. the integration of information about olfaction and gustation in the orbitofrontal cortex
d. the activation of the superior colliculus by visual information in patients exhibiting
blindsight
ANS: A DIF: Easy REF: Perceptual Reorganization
OBJ: LO 12 MSC: Understanding
45. Studies of cortical organization in blind people have shown that, compared to sighted people,
a. blind people show increased activity in the occipital cortex when sweeping their fingers
over rough surfaces and when given tactile discrimination tasks.
b. blind people show increased activity in the occipital cortex when given tactile
discrimination tasks but not when sweeping their fingers over rough surfaces.
c. blind people show decreased activity in the occipital cortex when sweeping their fingers
over rough surfaces and when given tactile discrimination tasks.
d. blind people show decreased activity in the occipital cortex when given tactile
discrimination tasks but not when sweeping their fingers over rough surfaces.
ANS: B DIF: Medium REF: Perceptual Reorganization
OBJ: LO 12 MSC: Understanding
TRUE/FALSE
1. During audition, sound vibrations are encoded as neural signals in the basilar membrane of the
cochlea.

ANS: T DIF: Easy REF: Audition OBJ: LO 1
MSC: Remembering
2. Unlike the visual system, auditory information does not pass through the thalamus on the way to the
cortex.
ANS: F DIF: Easy REF: Audition OBJ: LO 1
MSC: Remembering
3. The two ears of the barn owl are positioned asymmetrically on the head, improving sound localization
in the vertical direction.
ANS: T DIF: Easy REF: Audition OBJ: LO 1
MSC: Remembering
4. Odorants from the mouth can travel back up into the nasal cavity.
ANS: T DIF: Easy REF: Olfaction OBJ: LO 2
MSC: Remembering
5. The primary olfactory cortex is located in the parietal lobe.
ANS: F DIF: Easy REF: Olfaction OBJ: LO 2
MSC: Remembering
6. The senses of olfaction and gustation are known as chemical senses because they begin with
stimulation by chemicals (odorants or tastants).
ANS: T DIF: Easy REF: Gustation OBJ: LO 2 | LO 3
MSC: Remembering
7. The term proprioception refers to the sensation of knowing the position of the body and limbs.
ANS: T DIF: Easy REF: Somatosensation
OBJ: LO 4 MSC: Remembering
8. Different parts of the body are represented in the primary somatosensory cortex in proportion to their
size.
ANS: F DIF: Easy REF: Somatosensation
OBJ: LO 4 MSC: Remembering
9. Information about color is extensively processed in visual area V5.
ANS: F DIF: Easy REF: Vision OBJ: LO 7
MSC: Remembering
10. The term akinetopsia refers to unusual sensory unionseither between two senses, such as perceiving
tastes for words, or within a single sense, such as perceiving colors for letters.
ANS: F DIF: Easy
REF: Multimodal Perception: I See What You’re Sayin’ OBJ: LO 11
MSC: Remembering

SHORT ANSWER
1. Describe two ways in which the auditory system of the barn owl computes auditory spatial
information.
ANS:
Answers will vary.
DIF: Medium REF: Audition OBJ: LO 1 MSC: Analyzing
2. How do the two nostrils provide the brain with slightly different samples of the olfactory environment?
Why might this be advantageous?
ANS:
Answers will vary.
DIF: Difficult REF: Olfaction OBJ: LO 2 MSC: Evaluating
3. How do we know that somatosensory cortex is plastic? Describe the method and results of at least one
experiment to support your answer.
ANS:
Answers will vary.
DIF: Medium REF: Gustation OBJ: LO 4 MSC: Analyzing
4. Give several reasons why the following statement is incorrect: “The right visual field is processed by
the left hemisphere of the brain, while the left visual field is processed by the right.”
ANS:
Answers will vary.
DIF: Difficult REF: Vision OBJ: LO 5 MSC: Analyzing
5. How do receptive fields change as you proceed up the visual pathway (starting at the LGN)? Include
an example of a stimulus that would, and would not, cause a neural response for a hypothetical cell at
each stage.
ANS:
Answers will vary.
DIF: Difficult REF: Vision OBJ: LO 6 MSC: Analyzing
6. Why might it be computationally useful for the primate brain to have so many different visual areas?
ANS:
Answers will vary.
DIF: Medium REF: Vision OBJ: LO 7 MSC: Analyzing
7. Argue that activity in higher visual areas is more closely linked to the percept we experience than are
early visual areas, using experimental findings to support your argument.

ANS:
Answers will vary.
DIF: Difficult REF: Vision OBJ: LO 8 MSC: Evaluating
8. Describe two experiments that would allow you to determine if an individual has achromatopsia or has
akinetopsia. If the symptoms appeared after a head injury, which brain regions are likely damaged in
each case?
ANS:
Answers will vary.
DIF: Difficult REF: Vision OBJ: LO 9 MSC: Evaluating
9. What would the subjective experience of colorgrapheme synesthesia be like? Describe an experiment
(real or hypothetical) that would demonstrate that these associations are automatically experienced.
ANS:
Answers will vary.
DIF: Difficult REF: Multimodal Perception: I See What You’re Sayin’
OBJ: LO 11 MSC: Analyzing
10. Speculate about what kinds of information might be processed in the superior temporal lobe of a
congenitally deaf person. In your answer, consider the kinds of environmental information that are
especially important in the absence of sound.
ANS:
Answers will vary.
DIF: Difficult REF: Perceptual Reorganization OBJ: LO 12
MSC: Evaluating

There are no reviews yet.

Add a review

Be the first to review “Cognitive Neuroscience The Biology of The Mind 4th Edition By Mangun – Ivry – Test Bank”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Category:
Updating…
  • No products in the cart.