Chapter 9 Assessment of Psychiatric-Mental Health Clients

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Chapter 9  Assessment of Psychiatric-Mental Health Clients

 

 

Complete Chapter Questions And Answers
 

Sample Questions

 

eye contact, and moves his facial muscles very little, even though he is telling her about a very emotional episode he just experienced with his roommate. When describing the client’s affect, the nurse documents it as what?
A)
Labile
B)
Constricted
C)
Flat
D)
Blunted
Ans:
C

Feedback:

The client’s affect, or facial expression, would be described as “flat.” Labile affect is the abnormal fluctuation or variability of one’s expressions, such as repeated, rapid, or abrupt shifts. Constricted affect relates to a reduction in one’s expressive range and intensity of affective responses. Blunted affect is a severe reduction or limitation in the intensity of one’s affective responses to a situation.

2.
A client has obsessive–compulsive disease, which has seriously interfered with his ability to work. To help the client, the nurse must understand that a compulsion is what?
A)
A feeling of unreality or strangeness concerning oneself, the environment, or both
B)
An insistent thought recognized as arising from the self but not controllable by the person
C)
A repetitive intrusive and unwanted urge to perform or performance of an act contrary to one’s usual standards
D)
A fixed false belief not true to fact and not ordinarily accepted by other members of the person’s culture
Ans:
C

Feedback:

A compulsion is an urge to perform a behavior or the actual performance of the behavior (such as washing the hands), while an obsession is an intrusive thought that recurs, even when unwanted. Depersonalization is a feeling of unreality or strangeness, concerning self, environment, or both. Obsessions are insistent thoughts, recognized as arising from the self, which cannot be controlled. Delusions encompass fixed false beliefs not true and not ordinarily accepted by other members of the person’s culture.

3.
Which of the following statements made by a client diagnosed with depression would indicate that she may have a thought disorder?
A)
“I’m so angry. Wait until my daughter hears about this!”
B)
“I’m a little confused. What time is it?”
C)
“I can’t find my mesmer foot holders. Have you seen them?”
D)
“I’m fine. It’s my husband who has the problem.”
Ans:
C

Feedback:

The incorrect answers reflect cognitive awareness and clear thought, while the correct answer reveals that the client has made up a new word (neologism) for her shoes, which indicates the presence of a thought disorder.

4.
When differentiating a tactile hallucination from a gustatory one, the nurse understands that a gustatory hallucination is evidenced by what?
A)
An unusual sensation not felt by others
B)
A complaint of tasting something unusual
C)
Hearing voices not based in reality
D)
Seeing things that are not there
Ans:
B

Feedback:

Tactile hallucinations involve the sense of touch, while gustatory hallucinations involve the sense of taste. Gustatory hallucination is related to sensory perceptions of taste that occur in the absence of an actual external stimulus.

5.
The nurse observes a female client rubbing the chest of her asthmatic daughter with a coin. Which of the following reflects a culturally sensitive, or transcultural, response to this client?
A)
“Stop! You’re hurting your child!”
B)
“What is it that you are doing right now?”
C)
“I’ll have to inform the doctor that you are not following instructions.”
D)
“You are making your daughter cry.”
Ans:
B

Feedback:

The correct answer reflects that the nurse is attempting to ask a question that will help her to understand the client’s behaviors, which would be a culturally sensitive approach. The other answers demonstrate nonacceptance or a negative attitude from the nurse.

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