Chapter 58 Drug Therapy for Disorders of the Eye

$2.50

Pay And Download the Complete Chapter Questions And Answers

Chapter 58  Drug Therapy for Disorders of the Eye

 

 

Complete chapter Questions And Answers
 

Sample Questions

 

 

1. A patient is diagnosed with a fungal infection of the eye. What of the following medications is the most likely the cause of the fungal infection of the eye?

  1. A)  Ophthalmic corticosteroid
  2. B)  Systemic antibiotic agent
  3. C)  Mydriatic
  4. D)  Saline ophthalmic drops

Ans: A
Feedback:
Fungal infections commonly occur and may often be attributed to frequent use of ophthalmic antibiotics and corticosteroids. Systemic antibiotic agents are not the cause of fungal infections of the eye. Mydriatics are not the cause of fungal infections of the eye. Saline ophthalmic drops are not the cause of fungal infections of the eye.

2. A patient states that his eyes are “watering” excessively, and he claims that he has a gritty feeling of the eye. What common eye disorder is suspected?

  1. A)  Hordeolum
  2. B)  Blepharitis
  3. C)  Conjunctivitis
  4. D)  Glaucoma

Ans: C
Feedback:
Conjunctivitis is a common eye disorder with redness, tearing, itching, edema, and gritty sensations of the eye. Hordeolum is a sty. Blepharitis is a chronic infection of glands and lash follicles on the margins of the eyelids. Glaucoma is a disease with an increased intraocular pressure.

3. A patient has a foreign body in the right eye. What medication will most likely be administered before removal of the foreign body?

  1. A)  Cortisporin ointment
  2. B)  Proparacaine eye drops
  3. C)  Cephalosporin orally
  4. D)  Atropine eye drops

Ans: B Feedback:

Proparacaine is a commonly used agent to provide anesthetic. One drop is instilled in the affected eye prior to removing the foreign body. Cortisporin ointment would not routinely be administered before foreign body removal. Cephalosporin is not administered. Atropine eye drops are not administered for this purpose.

Page 1

4. A patient is scheduled for cataract surgery. What anesthetic agent should the nurse prepare to administer?

  1. A)  Acetazolamide (Diamox)
  2. B)  Pilocarpine (Pilocar)
  3. C)  Dipivefrin (Propine)
  4. D)  Lidocaine

Ans: D Feedback:

Injectable local anesthetics are administered by ophthalmologists, usually for eye surgery. Lidocaine is commonly used; it has a rapid onset and lasts 1 to 2 hours. Acetazolamide (Diamox) is not used as an anesthetic agent. Pilocarpine (Pilocar) is not used as an anesthetic agent. Dipivefrin (Propine) is not used as an anesthetic agent.

5. A patient is prescribed ophthalmic corticosteroids. What eye disorder may result from long-term use of ophthalmic corticosteroids?

  1. A)  Conjunctivitis
  2. B)  Hordeolum
  3. C)  Glaucoma
  4. D)  Blepharitis

Ans: C
Feedback:
Long-term use of corticosteroid ophthalmic agents may result increased IOP, optic nerve damage, defects in visual acuity, and fields of vision, cataracts, and secondary ocular infections.

6. A patient is predicted to benefit from dexamethasone eye drops. The presence of what eye disorder would contraindicate the use of this drug?

  1. A)  Fungal infection
  2. B)  Nearsightedness
  3. C)  Cataracts
  4. D)  Bacterial conjunctivitis

Ans: A
Feedback:
Contraindications to dexamethasone include corneal or conjunctival viral disease caused by herpes simplex, vaccina, or varicella. Also, other contraindications are mycobacterial and fungal infection of the eye as well as advanced glaucoma and hypersensitivity to corticosteroids.

There are no reviews yet.

Add a review

Be the first to review “Chapter 58 Drug Therapy for Disorders of the Eye”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Category: Tag:
Updating…
  • No products in the cart.