Chapter 57 Drug Therapy for Substance Abuse Disorders

$2.50

Pay And Download the Complete Chapter Questions And Answers

Chapter 57  Drug Therapy for Substance Abuse Disorders

 

 

Complete chapter Questions And Answers
 

Sample Questions

 

 

1. A patient has a long history of heavy alcohol use and has been admitted to the hospital for traumatic injuries after a motor vehicle accident. How should the nurse best assess the patient for physical dependence on alcohol?

  1. A)  Assess the patient’s perceptions of his coping strategies.
  2. B)  Assess whether the patient ever feels guilty about his drinking.
  3. C)  Assess the patient for signs and symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.
  4. D)  Assess the patient’s typical alcohol intake.

Ans: C
Feedback:
Physical dependence involves physiologic adaptation to chronic use of a drug so that withdrawal, or unpleasant symptoms, occurs when the drug is stopped, when its action is antagonized by another drug, or when its dosage is decreased. Assessment of coping strategies, alcohol intake, and the patient’s feelings about his drinking are relevant, but none directly addresses the possibility of physical dependence.

2. A patient is admitted to the hospital for treatment of a stasis ulcer of the right leg. The patient’s history indicates he has abused alcohol in the past, and he typically consumes at least eight alcoholic beverages daily. What symptoms should the nurse assess the patient for?

  1. A)  Confusion, hallucination, agitation, tremors
  2. B)  Denial, manipulation, combativeness
  3. C)  Depression, remorse, withdrawal from reality
  4. D)  Suspicion, mania, stubbornness, fear

Ans: A

Feedback:

Delirium tremens, the most serious form of alcohol withdrawal, is characterized by confusion, disorientation, delusions, visual hallucinations, and other signs of acute psychosis. Denial, manipulation, combativeness, depression, remorse, withdrawal from reality, suspicion, mania, stubbornness, and fear are not symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.

Page 1

3. A patient was admitted to the emergency room with acute alcohol intoxication and has been diagnosed with alcohol abuse after subsequent assessment and treatment. What are the goals of long-term treatment of this patient’s substance abuse disorder?

  1. A)  Detoxification, abstinence, and prevention of relapse
  2. B)  Withdrawal, reeducation, and compliance
  3. C)  Withdrawal, abstinence, and accountability
  4. D)  Assessment, planning, and intervention

Ans: A

Feedback:

The major goals of treatment for substance abuse are detoxification, initiation of abstinence, and prevention of relapse. Withdrawal may occur, but this is not a goal of treatment. The nursing process may be utilized, but the steps of the process are not the goals of treatment.

4. A patient is admitted to the inpatient alcohol rehabilitation program. What medication will the patient most likely be prescribed to treat alcohol withdrawal syndromes?

  1. A)  Clonidine (Catapres)
  2. B)  Methyldopa (Aldomet)
  3. C)  Chlordiazepoxide (Librium)
  4. D)  Atenolol (Tenormin)

Ans: C Feedback:

Benzodiazepines antianxiety agents are the drugs of choice for treating alcohol withdrawal syndromes. Chlordiazepoxide is administered to patients for acute withdrawal syndrome. Clonidine is not a benzodiazepine and is not prescribed for acute alcohol syndrome. Methyldopa is not a benzodiazepine and is not prescribed for acute alcohol syndrome. Atenolol is not a benzodiazepine and is not prescribed for acute alcohol syndrome.

5. A 77-year-old patient is admitted for the treatment of a fracture, and the nurse has identified that the patient has a history of heavy alcohol use. At what point should the care team administer pharmacologic treatments for alcohol withdrawal?

  1. A)  After skeletal muscle relaxants have taken effect
  2. B)  As soon as the patient shows signs of withdrawal
  3. C)  After cognitive behavioral therapy has begun
  4. D)  After treatment for the patient’s acute injuries has been completed

Ans: B
Feedback:
Treatment with chlordiazepoxide for alcohol withdrawal should begin as soon as the clinician identifies that the patient needs it. It is unsafe to delay treatment of withdrawal. Muscle relaxants are not indicated in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal.

Page 2

6. A patient is admitted to the emergency room suffering from symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. The nurse should plan care with the goal of preventing which of the following?

  1. A)  Bradycardia
  2. B)  Hypotension
  3. C)  Seizures
  4. D)  Gastrointestinal bleeding

Ans: C
Feedback:
In acute alcohol withdrawal, a goal of treatment is to prevent seizures. Bradycardia is not the primary symptom of acute alcohol withdrawal. Hypotension is not the primary symptom of acute alcohol withdrawal. Gastrointestinal bleeding results from heavy alcohol use but is not the primary symptom of acute alcohol withdrawal.

7. A patient who suffers from alcoholism is prescribed disulfiram (Antabuse). How does this medication assist the patient in refraining from ingestion of alcohol?

  1. A)  Allows the accumulation of acetaldehyde
  2. B)  Increases the level of serotonin
  3. C)  Increases the level of acetylcholine
  4. D)  Decreases stimulation of the CNS

Ans: A Feedback:

Disulfiram interferes with hepatic metabolism of alcohol and allows accumulation of acetaldehyde. Disulfiram does not increase the level of serotonin. Disulfiram does not increase the level of acetylcholine. Disulfiram does not decrease the stimulation of the central nervous system.

There are no reviews yet.

Add a review

Be the first to review “Chapter 57 Drug Therapy for Substance Abuse Disorders”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Category: Tag:
Updating…
  • No products in the cart.