Chapter 28 Child Health Nursing Partnering With Children & Families, 3rd Edition

$2.50

Pay And Download The Complete Chapter Questions And Answers

Chapter 28  Child Health Nursing Partnering With Children & Families, 3rd Edition

 

 

Complete Chapter Questions And Answers
 

Sample Questions

 

Question 1
Type: MCSA
Immediately after delivery, the nurse prepares to give the newborn a vitamin K injection. The new father is watching and asks the nurse why the baby is receiving a “shot.” The nurse would explain that vitamin K injections are given to newborn infants to:
1. Activate clotting factors.
2. Break up blood clots.
3. Promote red blood cell function and assist in gas exchange.
4. Promote the production of hemoglobin.
Correct Answer: 1
Rationale 1: Levels of clotting factors are lower in infants, so vitamin K is given prophylactically to activate essential clotting factors.
Rationale 2: Vitamin K is given to promote clotting.
Rationale 3: Clotting factors do not carry oxygen or carbon dioxide.
Rationale 4: Vitamin K has no effect on the production of hemoglobin.
Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying
Client Need:
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: 28-4

Question 2
Type: MCSA
Which of the following parental demonstrations indicates that the parents understand the nurse’s teaching with regard to prevention of iron-deficiency anemia?
1. The parents feed their infant with a formula that is not iron-fortified.
2. The child’s vitamin C consumption is limited after one year of age.
3. The parents start iron-fortified infant cereal at four to six months of age.
4. Cow’s milk is introduced into the child’s diet at six months of age.
Correct Answer: 3
Rationale 1: The infant’s maternal iron stores are depleted by six months. Infants who are not breastfed should get iron-fortified formula.
Rationale 2: Vitamin C should be started at six to nine months of age and continued because foods rich in vitamin C improve iron absorption.
Rationale 3: Starting iron-fortified infant cereal at four to six months of age is recommended for prevention of iron deficiency in children.
Rationale 4: Cow’s milk should not be introduced until 12 months of age.
Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Analyzing
Client Need:
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Evaluation
Learning Outcome: 28-2

Question 3
Type: MCSA
A child has been diagnosed with sickle-cell disease. Both parents deny having the disease themselves. The parents ask the nurse how their child got this disease. The nurse recognizes that the only possible explanation of the etiology is:
1. The father is not the biological father of the infant.
2. The mother of the child has the trait, but the father doesn’t.
3. The father of the child has the trait, but the mother doesn’t.
4. The mother and the father of the child have the sickle-cell trait.
Correct Answer: 4
Rationale 1: There is no indication that the father is not the actual parent. Both parents could be carriers of the disorder but unaware of their status.
Rationale 2: Both parents must have the trait for the child to have a 25% chance of having this disease.
Rationale 3: Both parents must have the trait for the child to have a 25% chance of having this disease.
Rationale 4: Sickle-cell disease is an autosomal recessive disorder; both parents must have the trait in order for a child to have a 25% chance of having this disease.
Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Analyzing
Client Need:
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment
Learning Outcome: 28-2

Question 4
Type: MCMA
The nurse is teaching parents of the child with sickle-cell disease how to avoid precipitating factors that can contribute to a sickle-cell crisis. Which are precipitating factors that could contribute to a sickle-cell crisis?
Standard Text: Select all that apply.
1. Regular exercise
2. Fever
3. Dehydration
4. Altitude
5. Increased fluid intake
Correct Answer: 2,3,4
Rationale 1: Regular exercise and increased fluid intake are recommended activities for a child with sickle-cell disease and will not contribute to a sickle-cell crisis.
Rationale 2: Fever, dehydration, and altitude are all precipitating factors contributing to a sickle-cell crisis.
Rationale 3: Fever, dehydration, and altitude are all precipitating factors contributing to a sickle-cell crisis.
Rationale 4: Fever, dehydration, and altitude are all precipitating factors contributing to a sickle-cell crisis.
Rationale 5: Regular exercise and increased fluid intake are recommended activities for a child with sickle-cell disease and will not contribute to a sickle-cell crisis.
Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Analyzing
Client Need:
Client Need Sub:
Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation
Learning Outcome: 28-2

 

There are no reviews yet.

Add a review

Be the first to review “Chapter 28 Child Health Nursing Partnering With Children & Families, 3rd Edition”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Category: Tag:
Updating…
  • No products in the cart.