Chapter 19 The Pregnant Woman

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Chapter 19  The Pregnant Woman

 

 

Complete Chapter Questions And Answers
 

Sample Questions

 

Multiple Choice

 

1. A 29-year-old homemaker who is G4P3 comes to your clinic for her first prenatal check. Her last period was 2 months ago. She has had three previous pregnancies and deliveries with no complications. She has no medical problems and has had no surgeries. Her only current complaint is of severe reflux that occurs in the mornings and evenings. On examination she is in no acute distress. Her vitals are 110/70 with a pulse of 88. Her respirations are 16. Her head, eyes, ears, nose, throat, thyroid, cardiac, pulmonary, and abdominal examinations are unremarkable. On bimanual examination her cervix is soft and her uterus is 10 weeks in size. Pap smear, cultures, and blood work are pending.
What is the most likely cause of her first-trimester reflux?
A) Increasing prolactin levels
B) Increasing ADH (antidiuretic hormone) levels
C) Increasing progesterone
D) Enlarged gravid uterus

Ans: C
Chapter: 19
Page and Header: 871, Anatomy and Physiology
Feedback: Progesterone lowers the esophageal sphincter tone, leading to reflux and heartburn. It also relaxes tone and contraction of the ureters and bladder, increasing risk of UTI and subsequent bacteremia.

 

2. A 26-year-old telephone operator comes to your office for her first prenatal visit. This is her first pregnancy. Her last period was about 2 months ago. She has no current complaints. She is eating healthily, taking vitamins, and exercising. She has a past medical history of an appendectomy as a teenager. Her mother had three children vaginally with no complications. On examination she appears healthy and her vital signs are unremarkable. Her head, eyes, ears, nose, throat, thyroid, cardiac, pulmonary, and abdominal examinations are also unremarkable. By speculum examination, her cervix appears bluish in color and highly vascular. A bimanual examination reveals a soft cervix and a 12-week-sized uterus. No masses are felt in either adnexal area. Results of her Pap, cultures, and blood work are pending.
What clinical sign is responsible for her blue, highly vascular cervix?
A) Chadwick’s sign
B) Hegar’s sign
C) Leopold’s sign
D) Leo’s sign

Ans: A
Chapter: 19
Page and Header: 871, Anatomy and Physiology
Feedback: Chadwick’s sign is observed during the speculum examination when the cervix appears more vascular and takes on a bluish hue. It can also occur with ectopic pregnancy.

 

3. A 22-year-old clerk, primigravida, comes to your office for a prenatal visit. She is in her second trimester and has had prenatal care since she was 8 weeks pregnant. Her only complaint is that she has a new brownish line straight down her abdomen. On examination her vital signs are unremarkable. Her urine has no protein, glucose, or leukocytes. With a Doptone the fetal heart rate is 140, and her uterus is palpated to the umbilicus. Today you are sending her for congenital abnormality screening and setting up an ultrasound.
What physical finding is responsible for her new “brown line”?
A) Corpus luteum
B) Linea nigra
C) Linea alba
D) Diastasis recti

Ans: B
Chapter: 19
Page and Header: 871, Anatomy and Physiology
Feedback: The linea nigra is a linear hyperpigmented area of skin along the midline of the abdomen. It is caused by the hormonal changes of pregnancy. It is considered normal.

 

4. A 20-year-old college student comes in with symptoms of fatigue, nausea, and an increase in urination. Her last period was 3 months ago (June 20, 2008). She is sexually active and always uses condoms. Her past medical history is unremarkable. On examination you see a young, anxious-appearing woman. Her vital signs are unremarkable. Her head, eyes, ears, throat, neck, thyroid, cardiac, pulmonary, and abdominal examinations are unremarkable. On pelvic examination a soft cervix is palpated and a 14-week-sized uterus is palpated. A urine pregnancy test is positive. You then inform the patient that she is expecting and, using Naegele’s rule, give her the estimated date of confinement (EDC, or due date).
What was the due date you gave her?
A) March 27, 2009
B) March 13, 2009
C) September 27, 2009
D) March 20, 2009

Ans: A
Chapter: 19
Page and Header: 878, Health Promotion and Counseling
Feedback: By Naegele’s rule you add 7 days to the last menstrual period and then subtract 3 months. This gives you March 27, 2009.

 

5. A 19-year-old childcare worker comes to you for her first prenatal visit. She cannot remember when her last period was but thinks it was between 2 and 5 months ago. When she began gaining weight and feeling “something” moving down there, she did a home pregnancy test and it was positive. She states she felt the movement about a week ago. She has had no nausea, vomiting, fatigue, or fevers. Her past medical history is remarkable only for irregular periods. She has been dating the same young man for a year. She says they were not using condoms. On examination you see an overweight young lady appearing her stated age. Her head, eyes, ears, nose, throat, neck, thyroid, cardiac, and pulmonary examinations are unremarkable. Her abdomen is nontender, with normal bowel sounds, and the gravid uterus is palpated to the level of the umbilicus. Fetal tones are easily found with Doptone, and with the fetoscope a faint heart rate of 140 is heard. By speculum examination the cervix is bluish and by bimanual examination the cervix is soft. Results of Pap smear, cultures, and blood work are pending. You give the patient her due date and how far along she is, based on your clinical findings. An OB ultrasound to confirm her dates is ordered.
With only the clinical examination, how many weeks pregnant did you tell this patient she is?
A) 6 to 8 weeks
B) 12 to 14 weeks
C) 18 to 20 weeks
D) 24 to 26 weeks

Ans: C
Chapter: 19
Page and Header: 881, Techniques of Examination
Feedback: Fetal tones can be easily found with Doptone and faintly auscultated with the fetoscope. The uterus is usually at the level of the umbilicus at 20 weeks. First-time mothers usually don’t feel fetal movement until 19 to 20 weeks.

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