Chapter 13 Male Genitalia and Hernias

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Chapter 13  Male Genitalia and Hernias

 

 

Complete Chapter Questions And Answers
 

Sample Questions

 

Multiple Choice

 

1. A 28-year-old musician comes to your clinic, complaining of a “spot” on his penis. He states his partner noticed it 2 days ago and it hasn’t gone away. He says it doesn’t hurt. He has had no burning with urination and no pain during intercourse. He has had several partners in the last year and uses condoms occasionally. His past medical history consists of nongonococcal urethritis from Chlamydia and prostatitis. He denies any surgeries. He smokes two packs of cigarettes a day, drinks a case of beer a week, and smokes marijuana and occasionally crack. He has injected IV drugs before but not in the last few years. He is single and currently unemployed. His mother has rheumatoid arthritis and he doesn’t know anything about his father. On examination you see a young man appearing deconditioned but pleasant. His vital signs are unremarkable. On visualization of his penis there is a 6-mm red, oval ulcer with an indurated base just proximal to the corona. There is no prepuce because of neonatal circumcision. On palpation the ulcer is nontender. In the inguinal region there is nontender lymphadenopathy.
What disorder of the penis is most likely the diagnosis?
A) Condylomata acuminata
B) Genital herpes
C) Syphilitic chancre
D) Penile carcinoma

Ans: C
Chapter: 13
Page and Header: 516, Table 13–2
Feedback: Primary syphilis causes a larger ulcer that is firm and painless. Syphilis is fairly uncommon but does occur in the highly promiscuous population, especially when coupled with illegal drug use. You should consider further questions and workup regarding HIV status.

 

2. A 20-year-old part-time college student comes to your clinic, complaining of growths on his penile shaft. They have been there for about 6 weeks and haven’t gone away. In fact, he thinks there may be more now. He denies any pain with intercourse or urination. He has had three former partners and has been with his current girlfriend for 6 months. He says that because she is on the pill they don’t use condoms. He denies any fever, weight loss, or night sweats. His past medical history is unremarkable. In addition to college, he works part-time for his father in construction. He is engaged to be married and has no children. His father is healthy and his mother has hypothyroidism. On examination the young man appears healthy. His vital signs are unremarkable. On visualization of his penis you see several moist papules along all sides of his penile shaft and even two on the corona. He has been circumcised. On palpation of his inguinal region there is no inguinal lymphadenopathy.
Which abnormality of the penis does this patient most likely have?
A) Condylomata acuminata
B) Genital herpes
C) Syphilitic chancre
D) Penile carcinoma

Ans: A
Chapter: 13
Page and Header: 516, Table 13–2
Feedback: Warts are generally painless papules along the shaft and corona. They are likely to spread and are caused by the human papilloma virus, transmitted through sexual contact. You should discuss prevention of STIs with him. Although his girlfriend’s contraceptive pill protects her from pregnancy, he and she are unprotected from sharing STIs. She should receive regular Pap examinations and consider the HPV vaccine.

 

3. A 29-year-old married computer programmer comes to your clinic, complaining of “something strange” going on in his scrotum. Last month while he was doing his testicular self-examination he felt a lump in his left testis. He waited a month and felt the area again, but the lump was still there. He has had some aching in his left testis but denies any pain with urination or sexual intercourse. He denies any fever, malaise, or night sweats. His past medical history consists of groin surgery when he was a baby and a tonsillectomy as a teenager. He eats a healthy diet and works out at the gym five times a week. He denies any tobacco or illegal drugs and drinks alcohol occasionally. His parents are both healthy. On examination you see a muscular, healthy, young-appearing man with unremarkable vital signs. On visualization the penis is circumcised with no lesions; there is a scar in his right inguinal region. There is no lymphadenopathy. Palpation of his scrotum is unremarkable on the right but indicates a large mass on the left. Placing a finger through the inguinal ring on the right, you have the patient bear down. Nothing is felt. You attempt to place your finger through the left inguinal ring but cannot get above the mass. On rectal examination his prostate is unremarkable.
What disorder of the testes is most likely the diagnosis?
A) Hydrocele
B) Scrotal hernia
C) Scrotal edema
D) Varicocele

Ans: B
Chapter: 13
Page and Header: 519, Table 13–5
Feedback: Scrotal hernias occur when the small intestine passes through a weak spot of the inguinal ring. The examiner cannot get a finger above the hernia into the ring. Hernias are often caused by increased abdominal pressure, such as in weight lifting. Patients who have a hernia on one side often have another hernia on the opposite side. In this patient’s case, a right-sided hernia was repaired as an infant.

 

4. A 32-year-old white male comes to your clinic, complaining of aching on the right side of his testicle. He has felt this aching for several months. He states that as the day progresses the aching increases, but when he wakes up in the morning he is pain-free. He denies any pain with urination and states that the pain doesn’t change with sexual activity. He denies any fatigue, weight gain, weight loss, fever, or night sweats. His past medical history is unremarkable. He is a married hospital administrator with two children. He notes that he and his wife have been trying to have another baby this year but have so far been unsuccessful despite frequent intercourse. He denies using tobacco, alcohol, or illegal drugs. His father has high blood pressure but his mother is healthy. On examination you see a young man appearing his stated age with unremarkable vital signs. On visualization of his penis, he is circumcised with no lesions. He has no scars along his inguinal area, and palpation of the area shows no lymphadenopathy. On palpation of his scrotum you feel testes with no discrete masses. Upon placing your finger through the right inguinal ring you feel what seems like a bunch of spaghetti. Asking him to bear down, you feel no bulges. The left inguinal ring is unremarkable, with no bulges on bearing down. His prostate examination is unremarkable.
What abnormality of the scrotum does he most likely have?
A) Hydrocele
B) Scrotal hernia
C) Scrotal edema
D) Varicocele

Ans: D
Chapter: 13
Page and Header: 518, Table 13–4
Feedback: Varicoceles are varicose veins surrounding the spermatic cord, coming through the inguinal ring. These veins feel like spaghetti and are often referred to as a “bag of worms.” The increased number of veins affects the temperature of the testes, often causing infertility problems. Like most varicose veins in any area, varicoceles can cause a nonspecific aching. Although usually benign, a unilateral varicocele on the right or a varicocele which does not resolve in the supine position deserves further workup.

 

5. A 48-year-old policeman comes to your clinic, complaining of a swollen scrotum. He states it began a couple of weeks ago and has steadily worsened. He says the longer he stands up the worse it gets, but when he lies down it improves. He denies any pain with urination. Because he is impotent he doesn’t know if intercourse would hurt. He states he has become more tired lately and has also gained 10 pounds in the last month. He denies any fever or weight loss. He has had some shortness of breath with exertion. His past medical history consists of type 2 diabetes for 20 years, high blood pressure, and coronary artery disease. He is on insulin, three high blood pressure pills, and a water pill. He has had his gallbladder removed. He is married and has five children. He is currently on disability because of his health problems. Both of his parents died of complications of diabetes. On examination you see a pleasant male appearing chronically ill. He is afebrile but his blood pressure is 160/100 and his pulse is 90. His head, eyes, ears, nose, throat, and neck examinations are normal. There are some crackles in the bases of each lung. During his cardiac examination there is an extra heart sound. Visualization of his penis shows an uncircumcised prepuce but no lesions or masses. Palpation of his scrotum shows generalized swelling, with no discrete masses. A gloved finger is placed through each inguinal ring, and with bearing down there are no bulges. The prostate is smooth and nontender.
What abnormality of the scrotum is most likely the diagnosis?
A) Hydrocele
B) Scrotal hernia
C) Scrotal edema
D) Varicocele

Ans: C
Chapter: 13
Page and Header: 515, Table 13–1
Feedback: Scrotal edema is a generalized swelling of the scrotum due to a systemic illness. No discrete masses are palpated. In this case, with the history of diabetes, hypertension, and coronary artery disease, the symptom of weight gain, and the signs of crackles in the lungs and an extra heart sound, the patient is probably suffering from congestive heart failure. This is also seen in patients with edema from hypoalbuminemia.

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