An Introduction To Community Health 7th Edition By James F. – Robert R. – Test Bank

$20.00

Pay And Download

 

Complete Test Bank With Answers

 

 

 

Sample Questions Posted Below

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter: Chapter05

 

 

 

 

True/False

 

 

 

 

  1. Community capacity is the characteristics of communities that affect their ability to identify, mobilize, and address social and public health problems.

 

Ans:  True

Page:  122

 

 

 

 

  1. The process for people to gain mastery over their lives and the lives of their communities is social capital.

 

Ans:  False

Page:  122

 

 

 

 

  1. Those who control, both formally and informally, the political climate of the community are referred to as gatekeepers.

 

Ans:  True

Page:  126

 

 

 

 

  1. When mapping community capacity, primary building blocks are the most accessible assets.

 

Ans:  True

Page:  129

 

 

 

 

  1. Health education and health promotion are terms that can be used interchangeably.

 

Ans:  False

Page:  131

 

 

 

 

  1. Those who the health promotion program are intended to serve are the priority population.

 

Ans:  True

Page:  133

 

 

 

 

  1. “To help employees learn how to manage their stress,” is an example of a program objective.

 

Ans:  False

Page:  136

 

 

 

 

  1. “By the end of the year, all senior citizens who requested transportation to the congregate means will have received it,” is an example of a well written program objective.

 

Ans:  True

Page:  136

 

 

 

 

  1. A trial run of an intervention is a pilot test.

 

Ans:  True

Page:  139

 

 

 

 

  1. Evaluation that is done during the planning and implementing processes is summative evaluation.

 

Ans:  False

Page:  140

 

 

 

 

  1. An activity or activities designed to create change in people is a needs assessment.

 

Ans:  False

Page:  137

 

 

 

 

  1. If those who initiate community organization are members of the community, the movement is referred to as being grass-roots.

 

Ans:  True

Page:  126

 

 

 

 

  1. There is one single, best preferred method for organizing a community.

 

Ans:  False

Page:  123

 

 

 

 

  1. In using a generic approach for community organizing, the first step in the process is recognizing the issue.

 

Ans:  True

Page:  125

 

 

 

 

  1. A formal alliance of organizations that come together to work for a common goal is a coalition.

 

Ans:  True

Page:  127

 

 

 

 

Multiple Choice

 

 

 

 

  1. Relationships and structures within a community that promote cooperation for mutual benefit describes
  2. A) community capacity
  3. B) social capital
  4. C) community organizing
  5. D) locality development

 

Ans:  B

Page:  122

 

 

 

 

  1. An assumption one can make while organizing a community is
  2. A) people have no capacity to deal with their own problems
  3. B) people have no ability or desire to change
  4. C) changes that are self-imposed have less value than imposed changes
  5. D) people should participate in making, adjusting, or controlling the major changes within their communities

 

Ans:  D

Page:  123

 

 

 

 

  1. A method of community organization that is often useful during movements, such as the gay rights movement, is
  2. A) locality development
  3. B) social planning
  4. C) social action
  5. D) gatekeeping

 

Ans:  C

Page:  124

 

 

 

 

  1. An example of a community gatekeeper is
  2. A) a politician
  3. B) a teacher
  4. C) a member of the clergy
  5. D) all of the above

 

Ans:  D

Page:  126

 

 

 

 

  1. A temporary group that is brought together for dealing with a specific problems is a
  2. A) coalition
  3. B) task force
  4. C) gatekeeper
  5. D) priority population

 

Ans:  B

Page:  127

 

 

 

 

  1. When mapping community capacity, the least accessible assets are
  2. A) primary building blocks
  3. B) secondary building blocks
  4. C) tertiary building blocks
  5. D) potential building blocks

 

Ans:  D

Page:  129

 

 

 

 

  1. The final steps in community organizing/building include
  2. A) needs assessment
  3. B) looping back
  4. C) program planning
  5. D) arriving at a solution

 

Ans:  B

Page:  130

 

 

 

 

  1. A process by which an intervention is planned to help meet the needs of a priority population is
  2. A) program planning
  3. B) health promotion
  4. C) needs assessment
  5. D) program evaluation

 

Ans:  A

Page:  132

 

 

 

 

  1. The means by which structure and organization are given to the planning process are
  2. A) planning models
  3. B) interventions
  4. C) outcomes
  5. D) evaluations

 

Ans:  A

Page:  133

 

 

 

 

  1. The process of collecting and analyzing information to develop an understanding of the issues, resources, and constraints of the priority population to better develop a health promotion program is
  2. A) a needs assessment
  3. B) setting appropriate goals and objectives
  4. C) creating an intervention
  5. D) pilot testing

 

Ans:  A

Page:  134

 

 

 

 

  1. Program goals
  2. A) are more encompassing than objectives
  3. B) are easier to complete than objectives
  4. C) have specific deadlines
  5. D) are measured in exact terms

 

Ans:  A

Page:  135

 

 

 

 

  1. “When asked in class, 50% of the students will be able to list the four principles of cardiovascular conditioning,” is an example of a
  2. A) process objective
  3. B) behavioral objective
  4. C) learning objective
  5. D) outcome objective

 

Ans:  C

Page:  136

 

 

 

 

  1. Implementing an intervention with a series of small groups instead of the entire population is
  2. A) pilot testing
  3. B) full implementation
  4. C) phasing in
  5. D) best practices

 

Ans:  C

Page:  139

 

 

 

 

  1. The evaluation that focuses on immediate observable effects of a program is
  2. A) formative evaluation
  3. B) impact evaluation
  4. C) outcome evaluation
  5. D) process evaluation

 

Ans:  B

Page:  140

 

 

 

 

  1. For community organizing/building and health promotion programming efforts to be successful, people must
  2. A) change their behavior
  3. B) be voluntary participants
  4. C) be community gatekeepers
  5. D) be a part of the planning committee

 

Ans:  A

Page:  121

 

 

 

 

Short Answer

 

 

 

 

  1. Explain the general foundation of the social ecological approach to behavior change.

Ans:  Behavior has multiple levels of influence.  Seldom is behavior change based on influence from a single level.  This approach emphasizes the interaction between, and the interdependence of factors within and across all levels of a health problem.

 

Page:  121

 

 

 

 

  1. Name at least three assumptions those who organize communities can make.

Ans:  Communities of people can develop the capacity to deal with their own problems; people want to change and can change; people should participate in making, adjusting, or controlling the major changes taking place within their communities; changes in community living that are self-imposed or self-developed have meaning and permanence that imposed changes do not have; a holistic approach can successfully address problems with which a fragmented approach cannot cope; democracy requires cooperative participation and action in the affairs of the community, and people must learn the skills that make this possible; frequently, communities of people need help in organizing to deal with their needs, just as many individuals require help in coping with their individual problems.

 

Page:  123

 

 

 

 

  1. Provide a summary, in order, of the steps in a generic model of community organizing and building.

Ans:  Recognizing the issue, gaining entry into the community, organizing the people, assessing the community, determining the priorities and setting goals, arriving at a solution and selecting intervention strategies, implementing the plan, evaluating the outcomes of the plan of action, maintaining the outcomes in the community, looping back.

 

Page:  125

 

 

 

 

  1. Explain the difference between health education and health promotion.

Ans:  Health education is only a part of health promotion.  Health education is any combination of planned learning experiences based on sound theories that provide individuals, groups, and communities the opportunity to acquire information and the skills to make quality health decisions.  Health promotion is any planned combination of educational, political, environmental, regulatory, or organizational mechanisms that support actions and conditions of living conducive to the health of individuals, groups, and communities.  Health promotion is much more encompassing than health education.

 

Page:  132

 

 

 

 

  1. List, in order, the generalized steps for program planning.

Ans:  Assessing needs, setting goals and objectives, developing an intervention, implementing the intervention, evaluating the results.

 

Page:  133

 

 

 

 

  1. List in order, the steps involved in assessing the needs of the priority population.

Ans:  Determining the purpose and scope of the needs assessment, gathering data, analyzing the data, identifying the factors linked to the health problem, identifying the program focus, validating the prioritized need.

 

Page:  134

 

 

 

 

  1. Describe the difference between goals and objectives.

Ans:  A goal is a future event toward which a committed endeavor is directed.  Objectives are the steps taken in pursuit of a goal.  Goals are much more encompassing and global than objectives, are written to cover all aspects of a program, provide overall program direction, are more general in nature, usually take longer to complete, do not have  a deadline, are usually not observed by inferred, and are often not measured in exact terms.  Objectives are more precise than goals.  Objectives address who, what, when, and by how much.

 

Page:  135

 

 

 

 

  1. Provide examples of at least three program goals.

Ans:  “To help employees learn how to manage their stress,” “To reduce the number of teenage pregnancies in the community,” “To help cardiac patients and their families deal with the lifestyle changes that occur after a heart attack”.

 

Page:  136

 

 

 

 

  1. Provide two examples of well-written program objectives.

Ans:  “On June 12, 2011, a breast cancer brochure will be distributed to all female customers over the age of 18 at the Ross grocery store.”  “By the year 2015, infant mortality rates will be reduced to no more than 7 per 1,000 in Franklin County.”

 

Page:  136

 

 

 

 

  1. List, in order, the steps involved in program evaluation.

Ans:  Planning the evaluation, collecting the data, analyzing the data, reporting the results, applying the results.

 

Page:  140

 

 

 

 

There are no reviews yet.

Add a review

Be the first to review “An Introduction To Community Health 7th Edition By James F. – Robert R. – Test Bank”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Category:
Updating…
  • No products in the cart.