A History Of Western Music 9th Edition by J. Peter Burkholder – Test Bank

$20.00

Pay And Download

 

 

Complete Test Bank With Answers

 

 

 

Sample Questions Posted Below

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER 5: Polyphony Through the Thirteenth Century

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Why is early polyphony considered a sort of gloss on the chant repertory?
a. the added melodies elaborated on the authorized chants
b. the added melodies improved the authorized chants
c. polyphony enabled composers to assign rhythmic values to the chant melodies
d. polyphony replaced the authorized chants
e. polyphony was composed in the most significant centers of learning in western Christendom

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   84–85 | 101

TOP:   Early Organum| Early Motets           MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The earliest written polyphony exhibited all of the following musical elements that continued to occupy composers throughout the history of Western music except
a. phrasing d. meter
b. counterpoint e. notation
c. harmony  

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   85

TOP:   Polyphony Through the Thirteenth Century                       MSC:  Applied

 

  1. The treatises Musica enchiriadis and Scholica enchiriadis use the term organum to describe
a. an improvised melody sung against a drone
b. monophony
c. a musical instrument with a keyboard, pipes, and a bellows
d. a strophic song
e. two or more voices singing different notes in agreeable combinations according to given rules

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   85                  TOP:   Early Organum

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. In organum, the voice presenting the chant is called the
a. bass voice d. original voice
b. drone e. principle voice
c. organal voice  

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   86                  TOP:   Early Organum

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Note-against-note organum offers composers freedom because
a. the organal part has many notes composed against each note in the chant
b. the organal part can move in contrary, oblique, parallel, or similar motion
c. the organal part occupies a range below the original chant
d. the organal part was improvised
e. there is a greater choice of allowable consonant intervals compared to earlier types of organum

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   88                  TOP:   Note-Against-Note Organum

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. In the twelfth century, which movement of the Mass would most likely be set polyphonically with organum?
a. Gloria d. Offertory
b. Gradual e. Sanctus
c. Kyrie  

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   88                  TOP:   Note-Against-Note Organum

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. The musical style of this excerpt is best described as
a. discant d. note-against-note organum
b. florid organum e. parallel organum
c. mixed parallel and oblique organum  

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   89–90            TOP:   Aquitanian Polyphony

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Aquitanian polyphony originated in
a. England d. Italy
b. France e. Spain
c. Germany  

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   89                  TOP:   Aquitanian Polyphony

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Which format best describes the presentation of the music in the original sources of Aquitanian and Notre Dame polyphony?
a. each part is written in a separate book
b. each part is written in separate areas on a single page
c. each part is written on facing pages
d. only the organal part is written down; the singer would know the chant by heart
e. the parts are aligned vertically in score format

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   90 | 98 | 104

TOP:   Aquitanian Polyphony| Perotinus Organum| Motets in the Later Thirteenth Century (Format)

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. In the notation of the rhythmic modes, the rhythmic duration of pitches was indicated by
a. letters d. numbers
b. ligature patterns e. stem lengths
c. note shapes  

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   92                  TOP:   The Rhythmic Modes

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. How many rhythmic modes are there?
a. 4 d. 8
b. 5 e. 10
c. 6  

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   92                  TOP:   The Rhythmic Modes

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The rhythmic modes were developed by composes working at the
a. Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris
b. Cathedral of Santiago de Compostella in Spain
c. monastery in Cologne, Germany
d. monastery of Winchester, England
e. Papal Chapel in Rome

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   92                  TOP:   The Rhythmic Modes

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Although Anonymous IV names Leoninus and Perotinus as creators of polyphony, scholars are unsure of exactly what they wrote. Why is this?
a. Anonymous IV is an untrustworthy source
b. No surviving sources of polyphony name Leoninus or Perotinus as the composers
c. The manuscripts containing the music were copied long after Leoninus and Perotinus lived
d. Scholars are unsure when Leoninus and Perotinus lived
e. The surviving music from the time does not match Anonymous IV’s description

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   93–94            TOP:   The Magnus Liber Organi

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. In Notre Dame–style polyphony, composers set melismas in the original chant as discant because
a. the composers wanted to use the rhythmic modes
b. discant is easier than organum for the choir to sing
c. discant is easy to memorize
d. polyphony ornamented chants for the most important feasts of the church year
e. setting melismas as organum would make the music too long

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   95–96

TOP:   Organum in the Style of Leoninus    MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Scholars think that the organum of Leoninus and Perotinus was first composed orally and was later written down. All of the following observations provide evidence for this except
a. the Anonymous IV treatise describes melodic formulas and calls them colores
b. discant was easy to remember because of its short phrases and the use of rhythmic modes
c. the organal voices contain recurring melodic formulas that were easy to remember
d. the compositions in the manuscripts known as the Magnus Liber Organi are all anonymous
e. there was a longstanding practice of composing orally and memorizing large amounts of music

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   96

TOP:   Organum in the Style of Leoninus | Oral Transmission       MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Most substitute clausulae were written in
a. Aquitanian style d. florid organum
b. conductus style e. parallel organum
c. discant style  

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   97                  TOP:   Substitute Clausulae

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Voice exchange is when
a. some voices sing while others rest
b. voices sing in florid style
c. voices sing in note-against-note style
d. voices sing in the same rhythmic mode
e. voices trade phrases

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   98                  TOP:   Perotinus Organum

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. You discover a previously unknown composition that is an organum triplum. Who is likely to have composed it?
a. Anonymous IV d. Perotinus
b. Franco of Cologne e. Petrus de Cruce
c. Leoninus  

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   98                  TOP:   Perotinus Organum

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. A polyphonic conductus is a setting of
a. a chant and a French prose text sung simultaneously in different voices
b. a single biblical text sung in all voices
c. a single French poem sung in all voices
d. a single Latin poem sung in all voices
e. a Latin poem and a French poem sung simultaneously in different voices

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   99–100           TOP:   Polyphonic Conductus

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. All of the following describe ways in which early thirteenth-century composers reworked motets except
a. adding a third or fourth voice to those already present, with all voices singing the same text
b. adding a third or fourth voice to those already present, with all voices singing their own texts
c. deleting the original chant and writing one or more new voices
d. deleting the original duplum and writing one or more new voices
e. writing a different text for the duplum that may not be related to the original chant

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   101–102         TOP:   Early Motets

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. The term cantus firmus, introduced around 1270, is synonymous with which of the following terms?
a. duplum d. triplum
b. motetus e. vox organalis
c. tenor  

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   103

TOP:   Motets in the Later Thirteenth Century                              MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. All of the following are names of rhythmic durations in Franconian notation except
a. breve d. semibreve
b. double long e. short
c. long  

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   104

TOP:   Motets in the Later Thirteenth Century                              MSC:  Factual

 

  1. This excerpt was likely composed by
a. Anonymous IV d. Perotinus
b. Franco of Cologne e. Petrus de Cruce
c. Leoninus  

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   106–107

TOP:   Motets in the Later Thirteenth Century                              MSC:  Applied

 

  1. A composer of late thirteenth-century motets was
a. Adam de la Halle d. Hieronymous de Moravia
b. Franco of Cologne e. Johannes de Garlandia
c. Guido of Arezzo  

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   105

TOP:   Motets in the Later Thirteenth Century                              MSC:  Factual

 

  1. English polyphony in the thirteenth century exhibits a preference for
a. alternating florid organum and discant within a composition
b. frequent use of dissonant intervals
c. the rhythmic modes
d. simple, syllabic, repeating melodies
e. unmetered organum purum

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   107                TOP:   English Polyphony

MSC:  Applied

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. Tritones were considered acceptable in organum.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   86                  TOP:   Early Organum

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Parallel fifths were considered acceptable in organum.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   86                  TOP:   Early Organum

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Polyphony was sung by a choir, with several people singing each part.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   88–89            TOP:   Note-Against-Note Organum

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The notation of Aquitanian polyphony shows the rhythmic duration of each pitch.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   91                  TOP:   Aquitanian Polyphony

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. In the original manuscript, this passage would have been notated using the rhythmic modes.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   92–93 | 96      TOP:   The Rhythmic Modes

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. The origins of Western rhythmic notation can be found in the rhythmic modes.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   92 | 104

TOP:   Motets in the Later Thirteenth Century | Franconian notation

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. In organum, voice exchange is when the duplum or triplum trades phrases with the tenor.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   98                  TOP:   Perotinus Organum

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. It is likely that Perotinus composed the surviving examples of organum quadruplum.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   98                  TOP:   Perotinus Organum

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Early motets could be secular.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   101                TOP:   Early Motets

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The motets of Petrus de Cruce are unmetered.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   106–107

TOP:   Motets in the Later Thirteenth Century                              MSC:  Applied

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. A type of organum described in Musica enchiriadis that includes intervals of seconds and thirds in order to avoid tritones is called

 

ANS:

mixed parallel and oblique organum

 

DIF:    Hard               REF:   86–87            TOP:   Early Organum

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. How is composing organum similar to the practice of troping chants?

 

ANS:

Both are additions or ornaments to the authorized chant.

 

DIF:    Medium         REF:   88                  TOP:   Note-Against-Note Organum

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. How were substitute clausulae used?

 

ANS:

Settings of segments of chants within a larger piece of organum were self-contained sections. These sections could be replaced by new self-contained settings of the same segment of chant.

 

DIF:    Hard               REF:   97                  TOP:   Substitute Clausulae

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Can the following excerpt be from a conductus? Why or why not?

 

ANS:

It cannot. In a conductus all the voices are set in essentially the same rhythm. In this passage the tenor is sustained and the quadruplum has longer notes than the other voices towards the end. A conductus is syllabic. This passage is an extended melisma on the syllable “Vi-.”

 

DIF:    Medium         REF:   99–100          TOP:   Polyphonic Conductus

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Why do motets have compound titles, with two or more phrases separated by slashes (for example, Super te Ierusalem/Sed fulsit virginitas/Dominus)?

 

ANS:

Each voice of the motet has a different text, each of which is identified in the title of the motet by the first few words.

 

DIF:    Easy               REF:   101                TOP:   Early Motets

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. What is the difference between a substitute clausula and an early motet?

 

ANS:

Compositionally they are the same; the difference is in the text. Motets have newly added words in the upper voices and are syllabic. Substitute clausulae were composed for chant melismas, so the only text is a single syllable on which the chant melisma was sung.

 

DIF:    Medium         REF:   97 | 101 | 103                                  TOP:   Substitute Clausulae| Motet

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. How many voice parts are in a double motet? Explain your answer.

 

ANS:

Three: one voice carries the chant (tenor) and two composed voices present different texts above the tenor. A triple motet would have four voices.

 

DIF:    Hard               REF:   102                TOP:   Early Motets

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Why were thirteenth-century motets most likely intended for elite audiences?

 

ANS:

The interplay of texts and combination of borrowed and new elements required an educated audience already familiar with the repertory to appreciate the subtleties.

 

DIF:    Hard               REF:   103                TOP:   Early Motets

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. What is the primary innovation in notation described by Franco of Cologne in his treatise Ars cantus mensurabilis?

 

ANS:

The shape of the note indicates its relative duration or rhythmic value. This is in contrast to modal notation, in which rhythmic values were determined according to the patterns of two- and three-note ligatures.

 

DIF:    Hard               REF:   104                TOP:   Motets in the Later Thirteenth Century

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Why do motets from the second half of the thirteenth century show more rhythmic flexibility than motets from the first half of the century?

 

ANS:

The development of Franconian notation allowed for more rhythmic freedom and variety than the previous system of the rhythmic modes.

 

DIF:    Medium         REF:   105                TOP:   Motets in the Later Thirteenth Century

MSC:  Conceptual

 

MATCHING

 

Match each score excerpt to the correct description.

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

 

 

  1. Aquitanian-style discant

 

  1. conductus

 

  1. motet

 

  1. Notre Dame–style discant

 

  1. parallel organum

 

  1. ANS:  B

 

  1. ANS:  D

 

  1. ANS:  E

 

  1. ANS:  C

 

  1. ANS:  A

 

Match each manuscript or collection to the repertory it contains.

a. Codex Calixtinus d. Winchester Troper
b. Magnus Liber Organi e. Worcester Fragments
c. Montpellier Codex  

 

 

  1. Aquitanian polyphony

 

  1. early note-against-note organum

 

  1. English rondellus and rotas

 

  1. motets in Franconian notation

 

  1. Notre Dame polyphony

 

  1. ANS:  A

 

  1. ANS:  D

 

  1. ANS:  E

 

  1. ANS:  C

 

  1. ANS:  B

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Discuss the role of improvisation and oral transmission in the development of organum.

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

  1. Compare and contrast the rhythmic style of polyphony from the Notre Dame school with that of motets from the thirteenth century. How do you account for the similarities and differences?

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

 

 

CHAPTER 24: Revolution and Change

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The Paris Conservatory was an important institution because it was
a. a step toward the democratization of music education
b. the last cultural institution established by Louis XVI
c. the first private educational institution established in revolutionary France
d. headed briefly by Beethoven at the request of Napoleon’s nephew
e. the first cultural institution established by the restored French monarchy after 1814

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   562                TOP:   Music and the Revolution

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The division of Beethoven’s life into three periods was
a. based on the three-part division of his autobiography
b. a revisionist periodization proposed by late-twentieth century scholars
c. based on Beethoven’s three successive relationships with Viennese music publishers
d. based on the divisions of his life first by his marriage and then by the birth of his son Karl
e. based on a biographical schema established by his early biographers

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   563                TOP:   Ludwig van Beethoven

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. In the years 1792–94 Beethoven studied counterpoint and composition with
a. Neefe and Albrechtsberger d. Lichnowksy and Razumovsky
b. Haydn and Mozart e. Haydn and Clementi
c. Haydn and Albrechtsberger  

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   564

TOP:   Bonn and the First Decade in Vienna           MSC:              Factual

 

  1. In Beethoven’s Op. 2 set of piano sonatas dedicated to Haydn, Beethoven’s stylistic debt to Haydn is most apparent in his
a. emphasis on long, lyrical musical themes
b. subjection of a small number of musical ideas to intensive repetition and development
c. inclusion of an unusual number of movements
d. use of funeral marches as slow movements
e. use of thickly doubled chords and extremely virtuosic figuration

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   565

TOP:   Bonn and the First Decade in Vienna           MSC:              Conceptual

 

  1. Beethoven initially attracted favorable audience attention through his
a. symphonies d. piano performances
b. conducting e. quartets
c. chamber music  

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   564–566

TOP:   Bonn and the First Decade in Vienna           MSC:              Conceptual

 

  1. Muzio Clementi and Jan Dussek were
a. two of Beethoven’s early composition teachers
b. the librettists for Beethoven’s Fidelio
c. Beethoven’s earliest biographers
d. members of Viennese society who established a stipend fund for Beethoven
e. piano composers whose novel textures and techniques influenced Beethoven

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   566

TOP:   Bonn and the First Decade in Vienna           MSC:              Factual

 

  1. Beethoven’s piano style developed mainly in connection with changes in
a. piano technology
b. audience tastes
c. his hearing ability
d. the music publishing and marketing industry
e. his patrons’ tastes

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   566

TOP:   Bonn and the First Decade in Vienna           MSC:              Conceptual

 

  1. Beethoven’s relative financial security was assured by
a. a generous pension granted to him by Napoleon Bonaparte as thanks for the dedication of the Third Symphony
b. an annuity provided by aristocratic Viennese admirers of his music
c. his lifelong employment by the Catholic Church
d. the inheritance he received upon his father’s death
e. a stipend established in 1815 by the Austrian republic

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   568

TOP:   Circumstances in the Middle Period                                  MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Beethoven’s music most closely mirrored post-French-revolutionary social changes in that it increasingly
a. dealt with the economic and social struggles of the lower classes
b. represented an entrepreneurial freedom from compositional convention
c. dealt with religious subjects
d. became simple and accessible so as to appeal to common people
e. was composed for private commissions rather than for public consumption

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   568

TOP:   Ludwig van Beethoven| Circumstances in the Middle Period

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Beethoven’s Third Symphony demonstrates how the composer
a. treated musical themes as though they were characters in a drama
b. consistently used longer, more lyrical themes than his predecessors
c. composed more concise development sections than his predecessors
d. would first introduce significant motives within a slow introduction
e. preferred to leave themes unaltered within a movement so they would be always recognizable

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   571

TOP:   Circumstances in the Middle Period                                  MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. One distinctive stylistic feature of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 is the
a. fantasia-like slow introduction to the first movement
b. unorthodox arrangement of its seven movements
c. attacca continuity among all its movements
d. tragic conclusion of the first movement in the parallel minor tonic key
e. unprecedented length of its first movement

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   571–573         TOP:   Eroica Symphony

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Beethoven’s negative reappraisal of Napoleon’s role in European politics was spurred especially by events in
a. 1789 d. 1815
b. 1799 e. 1824
c. 1804  

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   570 | 574

TOP:   Music and the Revolution| Eroica Symphony                     MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The slow movement of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 demonstrates the composer’s awareness of
a. English Restoration drama
b. French Revolutionary ceremonial music
c. popular Austrian peasant dances
d. J. S. Bach’s orchestral suites
e. the opening movement of Haydn’s The Creation

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   574

TOP:   References to the French Republic   MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The plot of Beethoven’s Fidelio is
a. a celebration of the heroic virtues celebrated during the French Revolution and its aftermath
b. a celebration of the defeat and exile of Napoleon
c. based on a play by Shakespeare
d. based on a play by Goethe
e. a celebration of Britain’s victory over France at Trafalgar

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   575–576

TOP:   Other Works of the Middle Period    MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. “Emperor” is the title of Beethoven’s
a. Third Symphony d. Fifth Piano Concerto
b. String Quartet, Op. 18, No. 6 e. Piano Sonata No. 21
c. First Symphony  

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   576

TOP:   Other Works of the Middle Period    MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The heroic narrative implicit in Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony is conveyed partly through
a. the conclusion of the symphony with a majestic fugue
b. the conclusion of the symphony in the parallel major mode of the tonic key
c. the inclusion of a funeral march movement
d. the incorporation of Russian melodies in the last movement
e. the setting of a poem by Friedrich Schiller in the last movement

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   576

TOP:   Other Works of the Middle Period    MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Beethoven’s third period was distinct from his second on account of all the following factors except
a. his nearly total deafness
b. his financial insecurities
c. political oppression and retrenchment
d. the occupation of Vienna by French troops
e. his family problems

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   577

TOP:   Circumstances in the Late Period     MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The composition below contains all of the following traits of Beethoven’s late style except
a. extreme contrast of registers d. unorthodox treatment of form
b. introspective, contemplative affect e. variation technique
c. fugal textures  

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   578–580

TOP:   Characteristics of the Late Style       MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Beethoven’s late style is characterized by all the following except
a. fugal passages or movements
b. extreme contrasts of dynamics and register
c. frequent juxtaposition of different styles and musical topics
d. frequent use of variation technique and form
e. simplified performance challenges aimed at amateur players

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   578–583

TOP:   Characteristics of the Late Style       MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. In his Op. 131 string quartet, Beethoven reorders the traditional symphonic movements as follows:
a. sonata allegro–scherzo–minuet and trio–sonata rondo.
b. sonata rondo–lyrical slow movement–scherzo–sonata allegro.
c. prelude–fugue–fantasia–rondeau.
d. fugue–allemande–sarabande–rondeau.
e. variation set–minuet and trio–sonata rondo.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Hard              REF:   582

TOP:   Characteristics of the Late Style       MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Beethoven departs from symphonic tradition in his Ninth Symphony by
a. using more than the traditional four movements
b. including a text from the Ordinary of the Mass
c. abandoning sonata form
d. omitting the scherzo movement
e. including a a choral movement

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   583–584         TOP:   Last Public Works

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. The movements of Beethoven’s Sixth Symphony represent
a. scenes in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet
b. scenes from nature and peasant life
c. different aspects of military heroism
d. the Lamentations of Jeremiah
e. characters in Goethe’s Faust

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   576–577

TOP:   Other Works of the Middle Period    MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Beethoven turned away from the extroverted, heroic style of his middle-period works because of
a. the final defeat and destruction of the Austrian empire in 1815
b. a lack of interest in his music among audiences and players after 1815
c. political repression in the Austrian empire after 1815
d. the restoration of the French monarchy in 1815
e. the establishment of parliamentary democracy in Austria in 1815

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   577

TOP:   Circumstances in the Late Period     MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The first-movement exposition of Beethoven’s Piano Sonata, Op. 109, is unusual because
a. it lacks a second theme
b. its second theme is in a different meter than its first theme
c. its second theme is not in the expected dominant key
d. its second theme is a slightly modified version of the first theme
e. its second theme is not in the expected relative major key

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   578–579

TOP:   Characteristics of the Late Style       MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 and String Quartet, Op. 131
a. both begin with fugal movements
b. are in the same key
c. were both written in the same year
d. both contain motives shared among several movements
e. both have irregular numbers of movements

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   576 | 582–583

TOP:   Other Works of the Middle Period| Characteristics of the Late Style

MSC:  Applied

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. During Beethoven’s lifetime, opera under the liberal French Republic was not censored as it was in German-speaking lands.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   562                TOP:   Music and the Revolution

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 1 demonstrated his determination to break free of the style and procedures of Haydn and Mozart, and to assert his own identity as a composer.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   568

TOP:   Bonn and the First Decade in Vienna           MSC:              Factual

 

  1. Beethoven left an account of his Eroica Symphony that clearly explains the heroic narrative embodied in the first movement.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   570–572         TOP:   Eroica Symphony

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Napoleon’s coronation as Emperor of France left Beethoven completely disillusioned by French political ideals.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   575                TOP:   Eroica Symphony

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Although he was adventurous and challenging in his writing for solo piano, Beethoven continued to write chamber compositions such as the String Quartets, Op. 59, in an accessible style appropriate for amateur domestic use.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   576

TOP:   Other Works of the Middle Period    MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The Pastoral Symphony is notable for its extra transitional movement.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   576–577

TOP:   Other Works of the Middle Period    MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Despite the difficulty of much of his music, by 1814 Beethoven was celebrated as the greatest living composer of instrumental music in German-speaking Europe.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   577

TOP:   Other Works of the Middle Period    MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Beethoven used old-fashioned Baroque contrapuntal techniques during his last decade.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   580

TOP:   Characteristics of the Late Style       MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. Despite contemporary recognition of his importance, much of Beethoven’s music remained incomprehensible to audiences and players for many years after his death.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   585                TOP:   Beethoven’s Centrality

MSC:  Conceptual

 

  1. The peculiar motivic and formal qualities of Beethoven’s music encouraged the development of specialized theoretical descriptions of musical coherence.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Medium         REF:   585                TOP:   Beethoven’s Centrality

MSC:  Conceptual

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. In what city was Beethoven born?

 

ANS:

Bonn

 

DIF:    Easy               REF:   564                TOP:   Ludwig van Beethoven

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Beethoven’s resolve in 1802 to persevere as a composer despite his deafness was affirmed in a document now known as

 

ANS:

the Heiligenstadt Testament

 

DIF:    Medium         REF:   570                TOP:   Circumstances in the Middle Period

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 was titled the ________ Symphony.

 

ANS:

Eroica or Heroic

 

DIF:    Easy               REF:   570                TOP:   Eroica Symphony

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Beethoven’s Egmont music was written to accompany stage performances of a play written by

 

ANS:

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

DIF:    Medium         REF:   576                TOP:   Other Works of the Middle Period

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The first movement of Beethoven’s Op. 131 string quartet is in the form of a

 

ANS:

fugue

 

DIF:    Easy               REF:   581                TOP:   Characteristics of the Late Style

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. Beethoven’s An die ferne Geliebte inaugurated the new nineteenth-century genre of the

 

ANS:

song cycle or Lieder cycle

 

DIF:    Medium         REF:   578                TOP:   Characteristics of the Late Style

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. The setting of the Ordinary that Beethoven composed for the installation of Archduke Rudolph as archbishop of Olmütz is known as the

 

ANS:

Missa solemnis

 

DIF:    Easy               REF:   583                TOP:   Last Public Works

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. As in his Third Symphony, the third movement of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony is not a traditional minuet and trio movement, but is called instead a

 

ANS:

scherzo

 

DIF:    Easy               REF:   576                TOP:   Other Works of the Middle Period

MSC:  Applied

 

  1. Beethoven’s choral writing in his last years was influenced by the choral style of the eighteenth-century composer

 

ANS:

George Frideric Handel

 

DIF:    Easy               REF:   583                TOP:   Last Public Works

MSC:  Factual

 

  1. What was the first government-supported music school established for the education of qualified students regardless of their background?

 

ANS:

Paris Conservatory

 

DIF:    Easy               REF:   562                TOP:   Music and the Revolution

MSC:  Factual

 

MATCHING

 

Match each historical figure to the work associated with them.

a. William Shakespeare d. Friedrich Schiller
b. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe e. Napoleon Bonaparte
c. Archduke Rudolph  

 

 

  1. Missa solemnis

 

  1. String Quartet, Op. 18, No. 1

 

  1. Ninth Symphony

 

  1. Eroica Symphony

 

  1. Egmont Overture

 

  1. ANS:  C

 

  1. ANS:  A

 

  1. ANS:  D

 

  1. ANS:  E

 

  1. ANS:  B

 

Match each event to the year in which it occurred.

a. Premiere of Beethoven’s Third Symphony
b. Premiere of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony
c. Beethoven writes his Heiligenstadt Testament
d. Napoleon defeated at Waterloo
e. Beethoven moves permanently to Vienna from Bonn

 

 

  1. 1815

 

  1. 1805

 

  1. 1792

 

  1. 1824

 

  1. 1802

 

  1. ANS:  D

 

  1. ANS:  A

 

  1. ANS:  E

 

  1. ANS:  B

 

  1. ANS:  C

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Explain how the music of Beethoven’s contemporaries and predecessors influenced his compositional styles and techniques. How did he adapt or change the conventions and practices (e.g., forms, musical processes, melodic and harmonic idioms, and textures) of his contemporaries and predecessors to suit his own creative and expressive goals?

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

 

  1. How do Beethoven’s life and career relate to the broader political, social, military, and economic events and changes that took place during his lifetime? How did his changing uses of musical form, content, and style reflect their historical contexts? Discuss a variety of his works from different stages in his career to support your argument.

 

ANS:

Answers will vary.

There are no reviews yet.

Add a review

Be the first to review “A History Of Western Music 9th Edition by J. Peter Burkholder – Test Bank”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Category:
Updating…
  • No products in the cart.